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Artist Biographies

 

Adelicia, Maria (San Juan)

Aguilar, Darlene and Rafaelita (Santo_Domingo)

Antonio, Frederica (Acoma)

Antonio,Jose (Acoma)

Antonio, Melissa (Acoma)

Antonio, Mildred (Acoma)

Aragon, Deborah (Acoma)

Aragon, Diane and Wilbert "Jr"

Aragon, Rachel (Acoma)

Aragon, Ralph (Zia, San Felipe, Laguna)

Arquero, Martha (Cochiti)

Askan, Linda, Cactus Flower (Santa Clara)

Atencio, Ambrose (Santo Domingo Kewa)

Baca, Jane (Santa Clara)

Baca, Johanna and Anthony (Santa Clara)

Baca, Wilma (Jemez)

Bailon, Angel and Ralph (Jemez)

Begay, Calvin (Navajo)

Begay, Joseph (Navajo)

Begay, Wallace N. (Navajo)

Begay, Westly (Acoma, Navajo)

Bluesky, Sasha (Navajo)

Bourdon, Birdell (Santa Clara-Tewa)

Brophy-Toledo, Cyndee Sandia (Jemez/Tesuque)

Cain, Mary (Santa Clara)

Cajero, Aaron (Jemez)

Cajero, Anita (Jemez)

Cajero, Esther (Jemez)

Calabaza, Emery (Santo Domingo)

Candelaria, Hubert (San Felipe)

Cata, Myrtle (San Felipe/San Juan)

Cata, Sophie (Santa Clara)

Cate, Joe (Santo Domingo)

Cerno, Barbara and Joseph (Acoma)

Charley, Renee (Navajo)

Charley, Thomas (Navajo)

Charlie, Michael (Navajo)

Charlie, Myron (Navajo)

Chavarria, Denise (Santa Clara)

Chavarria, Mildred (Santa Clara)

Chavarria, Stella (Santa Clara)

Chinana, Marie (Jemez)

Chino, Corrine (Acoma)

Chino, Edna (Acoma)

Chino, Keith (Acoma)

Chino, Monica (Acoma)

Chino, Myra (Acoma)

Chino, Terrance (Acoma)

Chosa, Erna (Jemez)

Claw, Reuel (Navajo)

Claw-Nampeyo, Carla (Hopi-Tewa)

Collateta, Princeton (Hopi-Tewa, Jemez, Navajo)

Concho, Carolyn (Acoma)

Coriz, Arthur and Hilda (Santo Domingo)

Coriz, Ava Marie (Santo Domingo)

Coriz, Joseph (Santo Domingo)

Curran, Dolores (Santa Clara)

Curtis, Manuel (Navajo)

Dallas, Tony (Hopi)

Dann-Lente Marquis (Laguna/Hopi)

Daubs, Dennis (Jemez/San Ildefonso)

Daubs, Gerri (Jemez/San Ildefonso)

Daubs, Patricia (Jemez/San Ildefonso)

David, Anthony (Hopi/Navajo)

Davis, Genevieve (Jemez Pueblo)

Dawahoya, Gene (Hopi)

Dawahoya, Nuvadi (Hopi)

Duywenie, Preston (Hopi)

Early, Max (Laguna)

Eckleberry, Naomi (Santa Clara)

Estevan, Berleen (Acoma)

Estevan, Jennifer and Patricio, Michael (Acoma)

Eteeyan, Kimberly (Jemez/Potowatomie)

Eteeyan, Mary Louise (Jemez)

Etsate, Bev (Zuni)

Etsitty, Rick (Navajo)

Fendor, Erik (Santa Clara)

Foley, Gordon (Jemez/Oto-Missouria)

Fragua, BJ (Jemez)

Fragua, Chrislyn (Jemez)

Fragua, Clifford Kim (Jemez)

Fragua, Felicia (Jemez)

Fragua, Glendora (Jemez)

Fragua, Joseph (Jemez)

Fragua, Juanita (Jemez)

Fragua, Linda (Jemez)

Fragua, Matthew (Jemez)

Fragua, Melinda Toya (Jemez)

Fragua, Phillip (Jemez)

Fragua, Virginia (Jemez)

Fragua-Tsosie, Emily (Jemez)

Gachupin, Bertha (Jemez)

Gachupin, Joseph (Jemez)

Gachupin, Laura (Jemez)

Gachupin, Rebecca (Jemez)

Gachupin, Wilma (Jemez)

Garcia, Adrian (Santa Clara)

Garcia, Elliot and Zelda (Acoma)

Garcia, Evangeline and Piaso, Helen (Navajo)

Garcia, Gloria "Goldenrod" (Santa Clara)

Garcia, Greg (Santa Clara/San Juan)

Garcia, Loretta (Acoma)

Garcia, Marcus and Virginia (Acoma)

Garcia, Sally (Laguna)

Garcia, Tina (Santa Clara/San Juan)

Garcia, Wilfred Jr. (Acoma)

Garcia-Rustin, Shawna (Acoma)

Gonzales, John (San Ildefonso)

Gurley, Rita (Navajo)

Gutierrez, Gary (Santa Clara-Tewa)

Gutierrez, Julie (Santa Clara)

Gutierrez, Margaret (Santa Clara)

Gutierrez, Paul & Dorothy (Santa Clara)

Guiterrez-Yazza, Ethel (Santa Clara-Tewa)

Harris, Clyde (Hopi)

Harris, Robert Jr. (Hopi)

Harrison, Jim (Navajo)

Harvey, Delwyn (Hopi)

Haya, Golie (Acoma)

Henderson, Christine "Aggie" (Acoma)

Henderson, Helen (Jemez)

Herrera, Edwin (Cochiti)

Herrera, Irene (Zia/Jemez)

Histia-Shutiva, Jackie (Acoma)

Homer, Marcus (Zuni)

Jim, Cheyenne (Navajo)

Juanico, Andy (Acoma)

Kahe, Gloria (Navajo/Hopi)

Kelsey, Alicia (Acoma)

Komalestewa, Alton (Hopi)

Kowemy, Wendell (Laguna)

Lewis, Carmel (Acoma)

Lewis, Diane (Acoma)

Lewis, Drew (Acoma)

Lewis, Judy (Acoma)

Lewis, Kathleen (Acoma)

Lewis, Sharon (Acoma)

Lewis, Travis and Rosemary (Santa Clara)

Lewis- Garcia, Dolores (Acoma)

Lewis-Mitchell, Emma (Acoma)

Lonewolf, Greg (Santa Clara)

Loretto, Fannie (Jemez)

Loretto-Maestas, Alma (Jemez/Laguna)

Loretto-Riley, Angie (Jemez)

Louis, Corrine (Acoma)

 

 

 

 

 

Louis, Gary "Yellowcorn" (Acoma)

Louis, Irvin (Acoma)

Lucario, Arthur and Velma (Acoma/Laguna)

Lucario, Ramond (Laguna)

Lucero, Joyce (Jemez)

Lucero, Mary I. (Jemez)

Lucero, Mary R. (Jemez)

Lucero, Virginia (Jemez)

Lucero-Gauchupin, Carol (Jemez)

Lucero-Loretto, Lupe (Jemez/Laguna)

Mansfield, Louis and Nadine (Acoma)

Martinez, Alice and Ruben (San Ildelfonso)

Martinez, Barbara (Santa Clara)

Martinez, Vickie (Santa Clara)

McKelvey, Lucy Luppe (Navajo)

Medina, Elizabeth (Zia)

Medina, Marcellus (Zia)

Medina, Sophia and Lois (Zia)

Mountain, West (Lacuna/Cochiti)

Naha, Burel (Hopi)

Naha, Sylvia (Hopi)

Namoki, Valerie (Hopi)

Naha-Nampeyo, Marty & Elvira (Hopi)

Nampeyo, Adel (Hopi)

Nampeyo, Carla (Hopi)

Nampeyo, Nyla (Hopi)

Naranjo, Dusty (Santa Clara)

Naranjo, Forrest (Santa Clara)

Naranjo, Glenda (Santa Clara)

Naranjo, Kevin (Santa Clara)

Naranjo, Madeline (Santa Clara)

Naranjo-Samaniego, Karen (Navajo)

Nashboo, Yvonne (Zuni)

Natseway, Thomas (Laguna)

Navasie, Charles (Hopi)

Navasie, Dawn (Hopi)

Navasie, Dolly Joe (Hopi)

Navasie- Garcia, Fawn (Hopi)

Navasie, Joy Frog Woman (Tewa/ Hopi)

Navasie, Marianne (Hopi)

Olivas, Gilbert (San Juan)

Ortiz, Norma Jean (Acoma)

Pacheco, Paulita and Gilbert (Santo Domingo)

Padilla, Andrew (Laguna/Santa Clara)

Panana, Reyes (Jemez)

Paquin, Gladys (Laguna)

Pashano, Alton (Hopi)

Pasquale, Darin and Michelle (Acoma and Laguna)

Patricio, Lillie (Acoma)

Patricio, Michael (Acoma)

Patricio, Robert (Acoma)

Pecos-Sun Rhodes, Rose (Jemez)

Peters, Franklin (Acoma)

Piaso, Helen (Navajo)

Polacca, Delmar (Hopi)

Polacca, Fannie L.

Polacca, Thomas (Hopi)

Pino, Erwin (Hopi)

Quannie, Kevin (Hopi/Navajo)

Quintana, Mary (Cohhiti)

Quintana, Pablo (Cochiti)

Ration, Bennie (Navajo)

Ration, Benson (Navajo)

Ray, Marilyn (Acoma)

Reano, Charlene (San Felipe)

Reano, Joe and Angie (Santo Domingo)

Red Star, Norman (Sioux)

Rhoades, Stephanie, Snowflake Flower (Cochitti)

Riley, Beatrice (Jemez)

Robertson-Navasie, Donna (Hopi)

Romero, Marie (Jemez)

Romero, Michael and Robin (Acoma)

Romero, Pauline (Jemez)

Salazar, Angela (Santa Clara)

Salvador, Theresa (Acoma)

Samuel, Jerry (Navajo)

Sanchez, Russell (San Ildelfonso)

Sandia, Dory (Jemez)

Sandia, Geraldine (Jemez)

Sandia, Kathleen Collateta (Hopi)

Sandia, Natalie (Jemez)

Sando, Caroline (Jemez)

Sando, Kenny (Jemez)

Sarracino, Myron (Laguna)

Sarrancino, Sharon (Jemez-Laguna)

Scarborough, Mary (Santa Clara)

Setalla, Dee (Hopi)

Setalla, Gwen (Hopi)

Setalla, Stetson (Hopi)

Shields-Natseway, Charmae (Acoma)

Singer, Tommy (Navajo)

Small, Mary (Jemez)

Star, Norman Red (Sioux)

Starr, Red (Sioux)

Stevens, Sharon (Acoma)

Suazo, Ron (Santa Clara)

Suazo-Tafoya, Emily (Santa Clara)

Suina, Dena (Cochiti/San Felipe)

Suina, Vangie (Cochiti)

Tafoya, Brenda (Jemez)

Tafoya, Eric (Santa Clara)

Tafoya, Gwen (Santa Clara)

Tafoya, Helen (Jemez)

Tafoya Naranjo, Madeline (Santa Clara)

Tafoya, Starr (Santa Clara)

Tafoya Oyenque, Linda (Santa Clara)

Tafoya, Vangie (Jemez)

Tapia, Mae (Santa Clara)

Teller, Chris (Isleta)

Teller, Leslie (Isleta)

Teller, Mona (Isleta)

Tenorio, Robert (Santo Domingo)

Tenorio, Thomas (Santo Domingo)

Tenorio-Vallo, Marlene (Santa Ana)

Torivio, Dorothy (Acoma)

Tosa, Bertina (Jemez)

Tosa, Christine (Jemez)

Toya, Benjamin and Geraldine (Jemez)

Toya, Camilla (Jemez)

Toya, Damian (Jemez)

Toya, Marie (Jemez)

Toya, Maxine (Jemez)

Toya, Vernida (Jemez)

Tsethlikai, Brian (Zuni)

Tsosie, Leonard (Jemez)

Tune, David (Navajo)

Vail Family (Navajo)

Vallo, Adrian (Acoma)

Vallo, Ergil Dalawepi (Hopi, Acoma)

Vallo, Jay (Acoma)

Vallo, Kim (Acoma)

Vallo, Leland (Acoma)

Vallo, Nathaniel (Acoma)

Victorino, Greg (Acoma)

Victorino, Sandra (Acoma)

Vigil-Toya, Georgia (Jemez)

Vote-Honani, Jocelyn (Hopi)

Whitedove, Shyatesa (Acoma)

Whitegoat, Hilda (Navajo)

Yazzie, Nora (Navajo)

Yazzie, Timmy (Navajo/San Felipe)

Yellowhorse, Ben (Navajo)

Yepa, Emma (Jemez)

Yepa, Marcella (Jemez)

Yepa, Maxine (Jemez)

Youvella, Nolan (Hopi)

"We who are clay blended by the Master Potter, come from the kiln of Creation in many

hues. How can people say one skin is colored, when each has its own coloration? What

should it matter that one bowl is dark and the other pale, if each is of good design and

serves its purpose well."

~Polingaysi Qoyawayma, Hopi ~

 

Each of our items is handcrafted and designed by Native American Artists unless otherwise noted. We are very proud of the artists our site represents. Unfortunately, the U.S. government has made it very difficult for some Native Americans to call their work true Native American art. The government requires specific permits and I.D.'s and entangles the system with red tape thus making it very difficult for some to register. While most of our artists do have the proper certification, some do not, so below you will find a disclaimer which is required by law for us to post.

DISCLAIMER

In the absence of a specific certification to the contrary, the seller does not warrant or represent that any particular item which is sold or offered for sale herein is an authentic Indian art or craft as defined by the laws of the State of New Mexico, the laws of the United States, or the laws of any other jurisdiction.

Adelicia, Maria (San Juan)

Native American artist Maria Adelicia is of San Juan pueblo descent from San Juan Pueblo, New Mexico. This beautiful black pottery starts with white clay made from the finest materials available. Every line on each piece is hand painted, then high fired at 2000+ degrees Fahrenheit.

Check for work by this artist in our Pueblo Pottery section!

 

Aguilar, Darlene and Rafaelita (Santo Domingo)

Rafaelita & Darlene Aguilar are full blooded Native American Indians who were born into the Santo Domingo Pueblo. Rafaelita was born in 1937 and Darlene was born in 1960.They are a Mother and Daughter who have teamed up to combine their efforts and creativity to continue a long lived tradition of hand coiling ancient traditional style of black on black pottery. Rafaelita was inspired to learn the art of working with clay from her mother, Miguelita Aguilar. Miguelita passed down all the fundamentals of working with clay and using ancient methods. Rafaelita in turn shared the knowledge with Darlene. Today they both work together as a team, hand coiling pottery and enjoying each others company.

They specialize in hand coiling the large black on black and red traditional Santo Domingo pottery. The elements used to hand make these wonderful pieces are all provided to them from Mother Earth. The clay is gathered from within the Santo Domingo Pueblo. Then, the clay is soaked, cleaned, mixed, hand coiled, shaped, sanded, painted, and fired outdoors, with straw, bark, and manure. They sign their pottery as: Rafaelita & Darlene Aguilar, S.D. P. They are related to the following artists: Marie C. Aragon (aunt) and Vidal E. Aguilar (cousin).

Awards:

-None to date

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

Antonio, Frederica (Acoma)

Frederica Antonio is a full blooded Native American Indian who was born in 1968 into the Acoma Pueblo. Frederica was inspired to continue the long lived family tradition of making pottery by her mother-in-law, Mildred Antonio. Frederica developed an interest in pottery making while observing Mildred hand-coil and paint on her pottery. Mildred taught Frederica all the fundamentals of pottery making. Frederica began making pottery at the age of 18.

Frederica specializes in contemporary hand coiled pottery with hand painted intricate eye dazzling designs. She fashions a brush from the stems of a yucca plant to paint her eye dazzling designs. She also paints using different colors of paint so the pottery gives you a unique three dimensional effect. She hand coils a variety of sizes and styles, every one of her pots is a one of a kind work of art; there are no two pieces alike. She signs her masterpieces as: F.V. Antonio, Acoma, N.M. Frederica is also related to Melissa Antonio (cousin).

Publications:

-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

Awards:

-2000 New Mexico State Fair 1st Place

-1999 New Mexico State Fair Honorable Mention

-New Mexico State Fair 1st Place

-Gallup Inter Tribal Ceremonies Honorable Mention

 

Check for work by this artist in our Acoma Pottery section!

Antonio, Jose (Acoma)

Jose M. Antonio is a full blooded Native American Indian from the Roadrunner Clan.  He was born into the Acoma Pueblo on March 13, 1966.   He credits his mother, Hilda Antonio, known for her hand sculpted owls, and his grandmother, Eva Histia, for his inspiration.  They taught him all the fundamentals of working with clay art using the ancient traditional hand coiling methods.  He was a natural at painting his designs at a very young age.

Jose specializes in authentic hand coiled and hand painted polychrome jars and bowls.  He gathers the raw clumps of clays from the Acoma Pueblo along with the natural vegetation which is used for making the natural colors used to paint the designs.  He begins by breaking  the clumps of clay and cleaning it until it reaches a fine medium.   Then, the clay is mixed with water and other natural pigments and thus begins the hand coiling process.  He rolls out snake like coils stacking each coil carefully to build the shape of the vessel.  Once the vessel has been shaped and formed it is set out to dry.  Then, he begins working on the natural vegetation that he has gathered such as, spinach plant which provides the black color, and various other plants that provide more vibrant colors.   A yucca stem is fashioned into a brush for painting the designs.  Once the vessel has dried he sands it for a smooth painting surface.  Then, he boils his pigments and plant life to form just the right colors.  He finally starts the authentic hand painting process on his vessel.  He enjoys painting feathers and fineline designs.  Once the painting has been complete and the paint has dried Jose  fires his pottery in a kiln.  His family is well known for their exquisite hand painted traditional designs.  He signs his pottery as:  J. Antonio, Acoma.  

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

Antonio, Melissa (Acoma)

Melissa Antonio, member of the Red Corn Clan and the Sun Clan, was born into the Acoma Pueblo in 1965. She  was raised in the traditional way and was taught to respect the Mother Earth, all its creatures, and the clay that it provides. She sparked an interest in becoming an artisan by observing her mother, Lillie Concho, at the age of 12. Lillie taught Melissa the process of gathering clay, preparing the clay, and making natural colors from other natural pigments which were gathered from within the Acoma Pueblo. By the time Melissa reached the age of 23, her skills had improved and her art reflected her experience as a fine artisan.

Melissa specializes in hand coiling the traditional black on white eye dazzler patterns. Her pottery is all constructed by methods used by her ancestors. Melissa will accent her pottery by adding a kokopelli band down the side of her pottery on occasion. She signs her pottery as: M.C. Antonio, Acoma.

Awards:

-1992 New Mexico State Fair 1st & 2nd Place

-1993 New Mexico State Fair 3rd Place

-1994 New Mexico State Fair 1st place

-Gallup Inter-Tribal Indian Ceremonies

-1996 Eight Northern Pueblos Art Show 1st place  -1997 New Mexico State Fair 2nd Place

Publications:

-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

Check for work by this artist in our Acoma Pottery section!

Antonio, Mildred (Acoma)

Mildred Antonio, member of the Eagle Clan, is a full blooded Native American Indian. She was born into the Acoma Pueblo in 1937. She was inspired to learn the art of working with clay at the age of 15. Mildred watched her aunt, Marie Torivio, construct her pottery and this sparkedan interest in her. Marie taught her all the fundamentals of working with clay using ancient traditional methods. Mildres has also been to several art shows to view the art of other pottery artists and gather some ideas for her own work.

Mildred specializes in the hand coiled traditional Acoma pottery. She is known for her swirl patterns, checker board patterns, and wild antelpe designs incorporated with flowers. She gathers her clay from within the Acoma Pueblo. The clay is hand soaked, cleaned hand mixes, hand coiled, hand sanded, hand painted, and fired outdoors, with natural pigments. Mildred gathers natural flowers and other pigments to boil her own colors on her masterpieces. Mildred signs her pottery as: M. Antonio, Acoma. She is related to the following artists: Santana Antonio (mother-in-law), Milissa Antonio (daughter-in-law), and Frederica Antonio (daughter-in-law).

Awards:

-1991 New Mexico State Fair 2nd Place

Publications:

-Indian Artist Magazine

-Southwestern Indian Pottery 1999 Edition

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

Check for work by this artist in our Acoma Pottery section!

Aragon, Deborah (Acoma) 

Deborah. Aragon, “Shri’My To Wi”, was born into the Pueblo of Acoma in 1963.

She began learning the art of pottery making at the age of 15. Deborah was inspired to continue the family tradition of making her pottery by her grandmother, the late Helen R. Vallo. Deborah often observed Helen’s hand coiling and painting techniques using traditional using all natural pigments.

Deborah specializes in contemporary stone polished and etched Horse Hair Pottery, otherwise known as “Greenware” or unfired pottery. Deborah randomly throws authentic horse hair on her pottery while its still hot and then, she removes the hair and she polishes her pottery with a stone. She also etches animals and geometric patterns on her pottery free hand. Her style of pottery has a unique Grey shaded color in comparison to the other horse hair pottery available today. She signs her pottery as: D. Aragon, Acoma.

Deborah is related to the following artists: Rose Chino, Grace Chino, and Helen Vallo (grandmothers). Michael and Robyn Romero (Brother-in-Law and Sister).

Awards:

-1999 New Mexico State Fair 2nd Place

-1998 New Mexico State Fair 3rd Place

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

Check for work by this artist in our Horsehair Pottery section!

Aragon, Diane and Wilbert "Jr" (Acoma, Laguna)

Acoma artists Diane & Wilbert Jr. Aragon use an airbrush to create the graduated color schemes in their pieces and then hand etch beautiful designs like kachinas, kokopellis and headdresses. Diane was born in 1965 into the Laguna Pueblo and has been working with pottery since she was 20. Junior was born into the Acoma pueblo in 1966 and has been working with pottery since he was 23. They sign their work as JR Diane Aragon, Laguna, Acoma Pueblo NM.

Check for work by this artist in our Acoma Pottery section!

Aragon, Rachel (Acoma)

Rachel Aragon is a full blooded Native American Indian. She was born in 1938 into the Acoma Pueblo. Rachel is a member of the Eagle Clan. Rachel was encouraged and inspired to learn the art of working with clay at the age of 10 from her mother, Lupe Araon. Lupe shared with Rachel all the fundamentals of hand coiling pottery using ancient traditional methods. Rachel graduated from High School in 1958 and then began pursuing a career in working with clay on a more professional level.

Rachel specializes in hand coiled traditional fertility pottery. She gathers her clay from within the Acoma Pueblo. Then, she soaks the clay, grinds the clay, cleans the clay, hand mixes, hand coils, shapes, sands, and hand paints the pottery, using natural pigments which she boils together to produce the natural colors she paints with. Then, she fires her pottery outdoors, with wood chips. She is well known for her light weight pottery and her beautiful hand painted designs. She signs her pottery as: Rachel Aragon, Acoma, N.M. Rachel is related to: Mary Trujillo (sister), Emma Chino (cousin), Marie Torivio (cousin), Carol Loretto, and Geraldine Sando (nieces).

Awards:

-New Mexico State Fair 1st Place

-New Mexico State Fair 2nd Place

-Santa Fe Indian Market 2nd Place

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

Check for work by this artist in our Acoma Pottery section!

Aragon, Ralph (Zia, San Felipe, Laguna)

Ralph Aragon is a full blooded Native American Indian. He was born into the San Felipe Pueblo and married into the Zia Pueblo, where he has lived for the past twenty years. As long as he can remember, Ralph has had the desire to create his own unique style of art. With traditional upbringing instilled in Ralph, he has learned to respect the beauty of nature  which is evident in his animal motifs and earth tone palettes, which are abundantly used in his art. Over the years, Ralph has experimented with his own unique style of painting. He combines contemporary painting techniques with traditional Zia pottery designs, in order to obtain the rock art images and patterns that are associated with social and spiritual themes. Ralph is a strong believer in continuing the traditional ways of his people.

Ralph studied at the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe, New Mexico., In addition, his own quest for a unique way to express his creativity has led him successfully to hand paint shields, pottery, and gourds. Because of this, he has created “something different” for us to enjoy and images that “help preserve his culture and heritage”. He specializes in hand painting handmade pottery using acrylic paints. He signs his pottery as: R. Aragon, incorporated with a Kiva step style, which is a celebration of Pueblo life and the festivities of harvest time.

Ralph is related to Dora Tse’Pe.

Awards:

-Santa Fe Indian Market 1st Place

-Eighth Northern Pueblos Exhibit

-Gallup Inter-Tribal Ceremonial

-New Mexico State Fair 1st Place

-Publications:

-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

-Southwestern Pottery 1999 Edition

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

Arquero, Martha (Cochiti)

Martha Arquero was born in 1944 into the Cochiti Pueblo. She has been making pottery sculptures since the late 1960’s. Martha was inspired to continue the family tradition of clay sculpting by her Mother, Damacia Cordero. Damacia taught her daughter all the fundamentals of clay sculpting that her Mother taught her.

Martha specializes in handmade clay sculptures like mermaids, frog storytellers, nativity’s, and traditional storytellers. She uses all natural pigments to hand coil her sculptures. Martha gathers her clay from the hills nearby her home. She learned how to clean, soak, mix, shape, sand the sculpture for the right texture, and fire her sculpture the traditional way, outdoors. The colors Martha uses on her sculptures are also made from natural vegetables and minerals that Mother Earth provides for her. Martha signs her sculptures as: Martha Arquero, Cochiti.

Martha is related to the following artists: Josephine Arquero, and Marie Laweka (sisters).

Awards:

-Santa Fe Indian Market 2nd Place

-Santa Fe Indian Market 1st Place 1984

Publications:

-Storytellers and Other Figurative Pottery

-The Pueblo Storyteller

-Collections of Southwestern Pottery

-Talking with the Clay

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

Askan, Linda (Santa Clara)
Linda is Summer Clan at Santa Clara Pueblo. She graduated from Espanola High School and also attended the Institute of American Indian Arts. Linda worked as a Respiratory Therapy Technician before she became a full-time potter. Her native Tewa name, given by her grandmother Adelaide (Lala) Sisneros, is "Jo Povi" which means "cactus flower." Both her grandmother and her mother, Marie Sisneros Askan were instrumental in teaching Linda how to create pottery in the traditional way. Although both women have since passed away, they are listed as Active Potters in the book Santa Clara Pottery Today, which published in 1975. Linda's father Andy Askan passed away in the summer of 1999.
 

Linda digs her own clay, coils the shapes by hand, and fires them outdoors in a dung fire. She creates both the traditional red and black pottery; the color depends on both the clay slip she uses, and her firing methods. Linda has two daughters of her own, Diana born in 1976 and Rose in 1978, and although they are currently in college, they too know the art of traditional pottery making, and Linda’s sister Birdell Bourdon is also a potter. Linda is also related to the potters John, Joyce, Linda and Merton Sisneros, and Earlene Tafoya.

Check for work by this artist in our Santa Clara Pottery section!

Atencio, Ambrose (Santo Domingo "Kewa")

Ambrose Atencio is a full blooded Native American Indian, who was born into the Santo Domingo Pueblo on June 11, 1963.  He learned the art of working with clay by observing his family members who were fine established artisans. He was taught all the fundamentals of working with clay using the ancient traditional methods. The lucrative aspect of the business was why Ambrose initially began to construct these fine vessels, but now he continues to practice his methods of hand coiling pottery to preserve the ancient traditional way of his ancestors and adds to their legacy.

He specializes in hand coiled, hand painted traditional Santo Domingo pottery. He gathers all his raw materials such as clay, sand, and natural plants from within the Santo Domingo Pueblo. He hand cleans the clay for impurities, mixes all the natural pigments with water, and begins hand coiling his vessels. Once the pottery is dry he sands the finished product to give it a smooth finish all around the vessel. Ambrose then begins to hand paint his beautiful designs with a stem of a yucca that has been fashioned into a brush. The colors he uses on his designs are also provided from plants such as: spinach plant and honey bee wax. His designs are usually the traditional bird, flowers, or geometric designs. He sets his pottery out to dry and then fires his masterpieces the traditional way, outdoors. He signs his pottery as: Ambrose Atencio Kewa, Santo Domingo Pueblo, and the year it was constructed.

He is related to the following artists: Hilda Coriz (sister), Arthur Coriz (late brother-in-law), Robert Tenorio (uncle), and Ione Coriz (cousin).

Awards:

-None to date

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

Baca, Jane (Santa Clara)

Starr is the daughter of Henry and Jane Baca. She has won FIRST, SECOND AND THIRD PLACE ribbons at the SANTA FE INDIAN MARKET AND The eight Northern Pueblos Show!  The Tafoya Family of Santa Clara Pueblo has been producing their famous Black wear pottery for generations. They use only natural Clays and slips found on the Reservation.

 

Baca, Johanna and Anthony (Santa Clara)

Johanna and Anthony work together on each piece they create. This art form was learned from well known artist Corn Moquino. They have 17 years of experience and work only with traditional methods. They do not enter their work for awards. While their work is of higher quality than many well known potters, they maintain a low profile status. They typically make traditional Santa Clara pottery with the serpent design.

Check for work by this artist in our Santa Clara Pottery section!

Baca, Wilma (Jemez)

Wilma Baca, “New Wheat”, is a full blooded Native American Indian. She was born into the Pueblo of the Jemez in 1967. Wilma was inspired to make pottery by her grandmother, Marie Reyes Shendo. Marie taught Wilma all the fundamentals of constructing pottery using ancient methods passed down to her from her ancestors. Wilma experimented with clay at the age of 5. She hand coils small bowls and outdoor ovens, and has continued to enjoy working with clay.

Wilma specializes in the natural hand coiled and etched Jemez pottery. Wilma gathers her clay from the grounds within the Jemez Pueblo. Then, she soaks the clay, grinds the clay, sifts, mixes, hand coils, shapes, paints, etches her pottery, and finally, fires her pottery outdoors using the wood chip firing method. She has been etching on pottery since 1989, and she does all the etching free hand. She doesn’t use templates at all. Her favorite pottery piece to coil is the wedding vase, because of its meaning: “The spouts representing two separate lives, the bridge at the top part unites these separate lives as one.” Wilma signs her pottery as: Wilma L. Baca, followed by the corn sign.

Wilma is also related to the following artists: Carol Vigil, Imagene Shendo (cousins) and Mildred Shendo.

Awards:

-2000 New Mexico State Fair 1st Place

Bailon, Angel and Ralph (Jemez)

Angel is originally from the Jemez Pueblo, but married into the Santo Domingo, where here husband, Ralph, is from. She has been making pottery since 1979. She was taught by her mother, Marie Coriz, and specializes in storytellers, nativity sets, and necklaces. She signs each piece A & R Bailon.

Check for work by this artist in our Jemez Pottery section!

Begay, Calvin (Navajo)

Calvin Begay is an award winning artist, jeweler, designer and master craftsman. He was born in Gallup, New Mexico in 1965 and raised in Tohatchi, northwestern New Mexico.

Calvin designed his first piece of jewelry at age 10, learning from his mother and uncle. In more than 20 years as a jewelry designer and craftsman, he has become a master in every aspect of the design and manufacturing process. He has won numerous awards at the Gallup Inter Tribal Ceremonial, including Best of Show in 1989. His jewelry has been featured in Arizona Highways and Southwest Art Magazines.

This gifted artist continually innovates and updates his designs, working in both gold and silver, and adding new motifs and stones to his repertoire.In his leisure time, Calvin participates in rodeos and rides in the back country in his all terrain vehicles. When he creates jewelry, that wild free spirit finds expression in precious metals and stone.

He has a unique ability to translate traditional Navajo inlay techniques into jewelry that reflects his Native American heritage, yet have elegant and contemporary flair. Calvin's work is prized by clients and collectors, not only in the Southwest, but throughout the United Stated and the world. In the artistry of Calvin Begay, the stunning beauty of the untamed West is reflected in the combination of color and design that create unforgettable pieces of wearable art.

Click here to see all available Calvin Begay jewelry

Begay, Joseph (Navajo)

Joseph Begay is a full blooded Native American Indian born into the Navajo Nation in 1964. He learned the art of carving on stones from his friend, Jeff Lewis. Joseph began carving on stone at the age of 22. The lucrative aspect of the business played a key roll in him becoming an fine artisan. It is his primary resource of income to support his family.

Joseph works with natural materials found through out the southwest. The materials that he primarily carves from are: alabaster, serpentine, picasso marble, jet, dolomite, amber, argyte, and sillonite. His distinctive animals include life-like representations of bears, turtles, eagles, coyotes, buffalos, and several others. His carvings are enhanced by either a solid or multi-color inlaid heartline or a prayer bundle containing arrows, feathers, and heshi that he places on the backs of his carvings. Joseph is proud and honored to be artistically gifted with this special talent. He is also extremely enthusiastic about sharing his carvings with all who respect and appreciate his artistic abilities and his cultural background. He signs his carvings as: J.B.

 

Begay, Wallace N. (Navajo)

Wallace N. Begay was born and raised at Tolani Lake, AZ just east of the San Francisco Peaks. Begay herded sheep as well as tended the family’s cattle and horses. Begay was born in 1957 during the early stages of the modernization of the Navajo reservation. Like many other Navajo kids, Begay attended a BIA Boarding school at Leupp, AZ. During  his immersion in the English culture, Begay began to draw using charcoal, pencil and eventually watercolors. Quincy Tahoma and Harrison Begay had achieved prominence in Indian art with their flat “Bambi” style of paint application. Many young Navajo artists emulated this technique, including Begay. However, Begay gradually began experimenting with texture created by charcoal. When Begay left Boarding School for High School at Windowrock, he had a substantial amount of training in the use of graphite, charcoal and watercolors. Art classes at  Windowrock opened new avenues of art in acrylic and oil painting, etching basic sculpture. Begay won many awards and began to sell his pieces.

 After High School, Begay attended college at Arizona State University where he was noted for his watercolor paintings. Begay left ASU temporarily and graduated from Maricopa Community College with an AA degree. Again, his art won student art shows. He later finished his studies in marketing at ASU. Begay worked as an Art Director for a feature magazine called “Navaho”. Shortly after that, Begay returned to college at the University of Arizona in Tucson where he was a senior majoring in painting and sculpture.

Awards: Begay has won several first prize awards beginning in 1982 at Gallup New Mexico’s Inter-Tribal Ceremonial Art Show, including one for pencil during the 1996 show. He has also won best in oil and watercolor categories at the Museum of Northern Arizona’s Navajo Show. Begay has won numerous recognition awards from the city of Gallup, New Mexico, University of Arizona Navajo County Fair and the Affiliation of Arizona Indian Centers, Inc. of Phoenix, AZ. Begay’s work has been featured in publications such as ENDURING TRADITION: Art of the Navajos by Lois and Jerry Jacka.

Art Style and Philosophy: “The perpetuation of the Navajo language and culture is important. I believe Native Americans have yet to see their true place in the modern art world as Chagall, Rivera O’Keffee, or Dali. My images are more surrealistic: realistic images in a deliberate dreamscape. I use traditional symbols to talk about the erosion of our culture but only to draw attention, discussion and hopefully resolution. I use painting, scratch board etching, graphite, wood and stone to express these ideas. Being a Native American artist of my generation carries a responsibility of communicating with the younger generations. They look to us for answers and inspiration. If we project the same clinched images, and worry only about the marketability on our art, we will fail. Our responsibility is to teach and carry on the culture, to replace our elders, but in this case, with the education of modern America.” W.N. Begay

 

Begay, Westly (Acoma, Navajo)

Westly was born into the Navajo Nation in 1965. He was taught by his long time companion, Marie Francis Vallo, an Acoma potter who is the mother of Leland, Kim and Thomas Vallo. Westly's work is a fusing of Navajo and Acoma traditions. He has developed his own unique style, giving his pots an amazing contemporary flare. He is well know for his beautiful parrot, flute player and lizard designs. He continues to grow as an artist and is gaining in popularity among mainstream collectors.

Check for work by this artist in our Acoma Pottery section!

Bluesky, Sasha (Navajo)

Sasha Bluesky is a full blooded Native American Indian. He was born in 1972 into the Navajo Nation. Sasha grew up with solid Southwestern traditions and many different styles of art. His mother owned a shop in the Old Town Plaza and Sasha was introduced to clay art at a very young age. While Sasha Visited his mother at her store, he would wander for hours studying and admiring the beautiful art surrounding him. He credits Joseph Lonewolf for his interest in becoming an artisan. Joseph’s work always inspired him and he wanted to develop his own style of miniature art and become just a famous. He learned all the fundamentals of working with clay by asking questions and experimenting with natural pigments on his own. He also is a professional tattoo artist.

Sasha specializes in handmade stone polished, hand carved, and hand painted miniature clay art. His carvings include kachinas, animals, and feather patterns. He enjoys nature and that’s where his inspiration and creativity come from. He also enjoys working with miniature art because the challenge of working with clay becomes more intricate and minute. The details, shapes, and carvings within each piece is simply spectacular once completed. He signs his pottery as: Sasha Bluesky, Navajo. He is related to Whirling Wind who is his father.

Awards:

-New Mexico State Fair

Bourdon, Birdell (Santa Clara-Tewa)

Birdell Bourdon, “Vine Flower”, was born in 1957 into the Santa Clara-Tewa Pueblo. Birdell was motivated and inspired to continue the long lived family tradition of hand coiling pottery using ancient methods from her Mother, the late Marie Sisneros. Marie was a Professor at the World College in Las Vegas, New Mexico. Marie taught Birdell all the fundamentals of pottery making the traditional way of her ancestors. Birdell has been making pottery since the of age 10. The lucrative aspect of the business encouraged Birdell to become an artist.

Birdell specializes in the hand coiled Santa Clara black polished pottery. She gathers clay from the Tribal clay pits within the Santa Clara Pueblo. Then, she cleans, mixes hand coils, shapes, and fires her pottery the traditional way, outdoors with saw dust. She coils many different sizes and shapes, like wedding vases and bowls. She also makes melon patterns on her pottery. Birdell is a fine potter whose art is crafted very well. She is presently mentoring her children with the traditional ways of making pottery so they too may have a prolific future artistically if they need to fall back on the business of making pottery. Birdell signs her pottery as: Birdell, Santa Clara Pueblo, New Mexico.

Publications:

-Working with Clay

-Collections of Southwestern Pottery

-Pueblo Indian Pottery 750 Artist Biographies

Check for work by this artist in our Santa Clara Pottery section!

Brophy-Toledo, Cyndee Sandia (Jemez/ Tesuque)

Cyndee Sandia Brophy Toledo, “New Snow”, member of the Sun Clan, was born in 1957. She is half Jemez and half Tesuque. Cyndee was inspired to continue the family tradition of pottery making by several of her family members. Tradition is an extremely high priority in her life. At the age of 10 she began experimenting with pottery. When she reached the age of 18 her interest in pursuing a career as an artisan had become much stronger.

Cyndee specializes in handmade natural story pots and natural seed pots. She constructs her pottery by the “pinch & coil” method. She gathers all her materials from within the hills of the Jemez Pueblo. She hand cleans the clay, mixes, hand pinches, shapes, paints and fires her pottery, outdoors. Every piece of her pottery tells the story of the circle of life. The birds of paradise reflect the male courting the female with flowers. Baskets filled with food represent the food of life. The rain represents showers of blessings. The elegant swans represent the gracefulness of life, hummingbirds and insects represent pollination for fullness in life in all the directions of the wind within the steps of life. Cyndee has established herself an a fine artisan, and continues to grow with experience as time passes on. Cyndee is related to Art & Rose Sandia (parents). She signs her pottery as: Cyndee Brophy, Jemez, NM, followed by a title of her work and year it was made.

Awards:

-1978 Towa Arts Honorable Mention

-1979 Towa Arts Honorable Mention

-1981 Towa Arts Honorable Mention

Publications:

-Miniature Arts of the Southwest

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

Cain, Mary (Santa Clara)

Mary Cain is a full blooded Native American Indian. She was born in 1915 into the Santa Clara Pueblo. She began hand coiling traditional Santa Clara pottery in 1930. According to Mary, “Pottery has been a part of her family heritage since as long as her great grandmother can recall.” Mary’s mother, Cristina Naranjo, inspired and encouraged her to continue the long lived tradition of working with clay. Her grandmother, Serafina Tafoya, was also a great inspiration to her. Mary can trace her roots back to great, great grandparents Sarafina and Geronimo Tafoya.

Mary specializes in traditional hand coiled black on black or red Santa Clara hand polished pottery, with carvings of water serpents and bear paws. Mary says, “I love the work and will continue to do this for as long as I can.”

Publications:

-Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery

-Talking with the Clay

-Southwest Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

-Pueblo Indian Pottery 750 Artist Biographies

Awards:

-Santa Fe Indian Market 1st, 2nd, & 3rd Place

-Eighth Northern Pueblo Exhibit 1st & 2nd Place

-New Mexico State Fair 1st Place

Check for work by this artist in our Santa Clara Pottery section!

Cajero, Aaron (Jemez)

Aaron Cajero is a full blooded Native American Indian. He was born in 1966 into the Jemez Pueblo. Aaron is a member of the Fire Clan. He began working with clay art in 1993. He learned the traditional way of hand coiling pottery using ancient methods by the members of his family. They taught him all the fundamentals of working with clay artforms. Aaron was quoted as saying: “I enjoy working with pottery because it’s an expression of how I feel about the beauty in nature and native American arts using all natural materials with mother earth has blessed us with”.

Aaron specializes in a very unique style of pottery which is a contemporary hand polished style. He harvests his natural slips and clumps of raw clay from within the Jemez Pueblo. He breaks down the clumps of clay and adds sand to temper the clay and hand mixes with water and begins the hand coiling process the traditional way, which is rolling out the  moist clay into snake like coils. Once his vessels are formed he sets them out to dry. Once his pieces are fully dried Aaron sands his vessels for a smooth finish. He hand carves various designs such as: bears, feathers, eagles, and serpents known as Avanyu’s which are believed to protect Pueblo People. He stone polishes his pieces to give it a beautiful shine. Aaron also fires his pottery the traditional way, outdoors with cedar woodchips. He signs his pottery as: Aaron Cajero, Jemez. He is related to: Joe Cajero (father), Esther Cajero (mother), Joe, Jr., Cajero (brother), Joetta Cajero, Loretta  Cajero (sisters), Anita Cajero (spouse), Teri Cajero (daughter), and Aaron Cajero, Jr. (son).

Awards:

-Santa Fe Indian Market 1st Place 2000

-Santa Fe Indian Market 2nd Place

-Santa Fe Indian Market 3rd Place

-Santa Fe Indian Market Honorable Mention 

Cajero, Anita (Jemez)

Anita Cajero is a full blooded Native American Indian. She was born in 1965 into the Jemez Pueblo, she is a member of the Sun Clan. Anita began experimenting with clay at the age of 3, she learned all the fundamentals of working with natural pigments and slips from her  family members and friends. Anita graduated with a BA from New Mexico Highlands University in 1983.

              Anita specializes in hand sculpted and hand painted clay figurines, and traditional hand coiled pottery. She gathers her natural materials  from within the Jemez Pueblo. Once her materials are harvested Anita breaks down the clumps of clay and temper, then, she mixes them together to begin the process of constructing her beautiful  storytellers and fine pottery. She uses the pinch and coil method to build her figurines a similar technique to hand coiling. Once her figurine has been formed she allows the piece to dry. Once it has dried Anita uses a piece of sand paper to smooth out the rough edges. Finally, she is ready to hand paint using a stem of  a yucca plant which is fashioned into a brush. When she is done with the painting she fires her pottery either the traditional way, outdoors, or in a kiln. Anita enjoys making clay figurines because it is a way to express the Pueblo Culture. She signs her art as: Anita Cajero, Jemez. She is related to John Carrillo (father), Teresita Loretto (mother), Aaron Cajero, Sr. (spouse), Julie Loretto, Felicia Loretto (sisters), Leonora Loretto (grandmother), Esther Cajero (mother-in-law), Teri Cajero (daughter), and Aaron Cajero, Jr. (son).

Awards:

-Eighth Northern Pueblo Indian Market

-Santa Fe Indian Market

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Pueblo and Navajo Contemporary Pottery

-Directory of Artists

-Storytellers and Other Figurative Pottery

Cajero, Esther (Jemez)

Esther Cajero, “Bird Image”, member of the Fire Clan, was born into the Jemez Pueblo in 1944. She signed up for a pottery class in college and that’s where her interest in pottery making was sparked. In 1980 she started experimenting with pottery again, while watching her Grandmother, Petra C. Romero, hand coil her pottery.

Esther specializes in handmade storytellers, clay sculptures, and can hand coil pottery. She digs up her own clay, mixes, shapes, paints, and fires her pottery the traditional way, outdoors. Esther uses all natural clays and natural paints. Sometimes Esther will accent her storytellers with a parasol to add a little flare. She customizes to special orders upon request. Esther signs her pottery as: E. Cajero, Bird Image, Jemez, followed by a title which she calls her figurines. Esther is related to the following artists: Joe V. Cajero, Jr. (son), and Gabriel Cajero (nephew).

Awards:

-Santa Fe Indian Market

-Heard Museum Art Show

-Colorado Indian Market

-Red Earth Indian Market

-Santa Monica Indian Market

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Storytellers and Other Figurative Pottery

Calabaza, Emery (Santo Domingo)

Emery Calabaza was born in 1958 into the Santo Domingo Pueblo. He was inspired on his own to make jewelry. He began hand making his jewelry in 1973 at the age of 15. Emery is a self taught jeweler. He was also inspired by his creativity and economic motivation.

Emery specializes in hand cut wafer stone jewelry. He will search for raw chunks of turquoise or jet (hardened coal). He slices and grinds down the chunks of stone into small flat round wafers that he can string into beautiful necklaces, and earrings. Emery’s quality of work in wafer stone cutting is one of the finest you can find today. He makes the single, double, and triple strand necklaces. Emery does not sign his name on his work because it is impossible to carve it anywhere on his jewelry.

Emery is related to the following artists: Lita Lovato (cousin) and Thomas Calabaza (uncle).

 

Awards:

-New Mexico State Fair 1996 2nd place

Candelaria, Hubert (San Felipe)

Hubert Candelaria, “Butterfly”, was born into the San Felipe Pueblo in 1965. He was inspired to continue a long lived tradition of working with clay by the late Maria Martinez, who was well known for her black on black pottery, and Nancy Youngblood. Hubert is a self taught artist. He began working with clay at the age of 21. He experimented with different types of clay until he found his own unique style. He admired Maria’s work and hoped that someday he could develop his own unique style to the art world. He has established himself as a fine artisan and has reached his goal of adding his own style to the art world.

Hubert specializes in hand coiled contemporary swirl, puzzle pots, and holey pots with sharp rounded ridges. He gathers his clay from the grounds within the San Felipe Pueblo. Hubert hand cleans, mixes, hand coils, shapes, sands, and fires his pottery in a kiln. He has established a reputation of a fine artsman. Hubert signs his pottery as: Hubert Candelaria, San Felipe Pueblo, followed by the date the pottery was made.

Awards:

-New Mexico State Fair

-Santa Fe Indian Market

-Gallup Intertribal

Publications:

-Southwest Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

-Southwestern Pottery 1999 Edition

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

Cata, Myrtle (San Felipe/San Juan)

Myrtle Cata is a full blooded Native American Indian, member of the Turquoise Clan, who was born in 1953. She is part San Felipe and part San Juan Pueblo. She was inspired to continue the long lived tradition of hand coiling pottery from within her heart. The lucrative aspect of the business was also inspiration for her decision to become an artist. She has been hand coiling pottery since 1979. She attended many art classes to learn the art of working with clay. While going to school, she developed a friendship with Tina Garcia from the Santa Clara Pueblo. They shared special techniques and learned each other’s methods of working with clay.

Myrtle specializes in contemporary hand coiled San Juan style pottery. Her pottery style is simple in appearance. It is thin walled, graceful, and undecorated. She gathers her clay from within the San Juan Pueblo. Then, she cleans, mixes, hand coils, shapes, and fires her pottery, outdoors. She signs her pottery as: Myrtle Cata, San Juan Pueblo. Myrtle is a very creative artist that expands her creativity in many directions. She constructs men’s head dresses among many of her other creations.

Awards:

-1986 Santa Fe Indian Market 3rd place

-1997 Gallup Inter-Tribal Ceremonial 1st place

-1998 Gallup Inter-Tribal Ceremonial 1st place

-1999 New Mexico State Fair 4th Place

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

Cata, Sophie (Santa Clara)

Sophie is the daughter of Francis Salazar and comes from a long line of women potters. Flora Naranjo, a well known Santa Clara potter,  is her grandmother. She resides in the San Juan Pueblo and makes the traditional Santa Clara Black deep carved pottery. She makes mouths of her pottery in square, triangular, and circular shapes. Her designs include kiva steps, clouds, mountains, and many other traditional Santa Clara designs.

Check for work by this artist in our Santa Clara Pottery section!

Cate, Joe (Santo Domingo)

Joe Cate is a full blooded Native American Indian. He was born in 1944 into the Santo Domingo Pueblo.  He was inspired to continue the long lived tradition of hand making jewelry from his ancestors using ancient methods of constructing the fine jewelry. The lucrative aspect of the business also encouraged him to become a jewelry artist.

Santo Domingo jewelers have an incredible history of creating essentially the same type of jewelry perhaps for thousands of years.  Joe colaborates with his wife, Rosey and they specialize in turquoise and heishi necklaces in which each bead is authentically handmade giving each piece an individual incredible feel. Their designs of the stone mosiac and shell earrings that they creates are beautiful, and while they look very contemporary, the designs are very ancient. He learned all the fundamentals of working with raw nuggets of various stones at a very young age.  Joe is related to: Joe Cate, Sr. & Crucita Cate (parents), Rosey cate (spouse), and Arvin Cate.

Awards:

-1995 Santa Fe Indian Market 1st Place

-1998 Santa Fe Indian Market 3rd Place

-1999 Santa Fe Indian Market 3rd Place

Publications:

-American Indian Jewelry 1 1,200 Artist

Cerno, Barbara and Joseph (Acoma)

Barbara & Joseph Cerno are full blooded Native Americans. Barbara was born in 1951 and is half Acoma and half Hopi. Joseph was born in 1947 into the Acoma Pueblo. Joseph was exposed to art at a very young age by his Mother and Grandmother They both were recognized coast to coast as prolific and established artisans. Joseph was exposed to their excellent craftsmanship and traditional ancient designs. His participation in the process of pottery making was not encouraged. However, he was intrigued by the designs and shapes of ancient pottery made by his ancestors. Joseph & Barbara are, essentially self taught artists. They are among some of the finest potter’s of our era.

Barbara & Joseph specialize in handmade traditional Acoma pottery. The clay is gathered within the Acoma Pueblo grounds. All the materials used to make their pottery is from Mother Earth. They clean, mix, coil, shape, sand, paint, and fire the pottery outdoors, just like their ancestors before them. They both participate and contribute equally while making their pottery. They are especially known for their brilliant and large olla pots, with painted patterns of traditional brilliant parrots. They have studied the ancient pottery shards found within the many ruins in their Pueblo, so that they keep within the traditional styles of their ancestors. They have dedicated many hours of trial and error in perfecting the skill and artistry necessary to make quality pottery. Joseph and Barbara are widely recognized as the creators of pottery products that truly reflect the traditional styling of their Indian Ancestors. They have proudly demonstrated their skills in many events and they have conducted several seminars under the auspices of the Crow Canyon Archaeological Center of Cortez, CO. This has allowed them to extend their field of research into the the Museum of Western New Mexico University, which is recognized as one of the outstanding  repositories of the Mimbres Cultures. They have won many awards in which are too numerous to list. The quality of these potter’s will endure for eternity.

They have also introduced their children to the art of making pottery, the traditional  way. They are very proud of their children who have won numerous awards and are establishing themselves as quality artists. They sign their pottery as: Acoma, NM, Barbara & Joseph Cerno, followed by the year the pot was made.

Awards:

-Too many awards to list

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-American Indian Pottery 2nd Ed.

-Beyond Tradition

-Soutwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

Check for work by this artist in our Acoma Pottery section!

Charley, Renee (Navajo)  Artifacts

Renee Charley is a full blooded native American Indian.  Her father is silversmith Thomas Charley.  She was born in White Horse Lake, NM then moved to Grants and began making Kachinas and Artifacts.  Since 2001, Renee has been making headdresses and artifacts in Albuquerque.  Renee has four kids, ages 12, 10, 4 and 18 months.

Check for work by this artist in our Artifacts section!

Charley, Thomas (Navajo)   Jewelry

 

Thomas Charley is full blooded Native American Indian.  He was born in in 1952 into the Navajo Reservation.  He was born and raised in Crownpoint, New Mexico.  He has been creating jewelry since 1977.  He specializes in his own unique contemporary style that he has developed on his own.  His style is both stylish and very dramatic while still having all the character and ethics of his forefathers that introduced him into the business.  Thomas’ jewelry features  strong sterling silver links over which he has placed a wide row of domed silver bars that create a type of rope motif.  Quite cleverly done, because by constructing it in this manner the jewelry is much, much lighter weight (and wears comfortably) than if it were of a solid casting style.  Then, on the either side of his bracelets specifically the big ropes are two smaller ropes of twisted wire done by carefully wrapping two pieces of sterling silver around one another, set in a polished frame.  His earrings, watches, rings, bracelets, concho belts, and bolo ties are all easily recognized by his beautiful sterling silver designs.  His masterpieces are very stylish, elegant, and oh so sophisticated.  He has always signed his jewelry with his logo TC Sterling.  Thomas is related to: Bessie and Doris Charley (sisters), Renee Charley (daughter) and Al Charley (brother) who also are known for their fine craftsmanship in the art of jewelry making.

Awards:

-Navajo Nation Art Fair Windowrock, AZ

 

Check for work by this artist in our Jewelry section!

Charlie, Michael (Navajo)

Michael Charlie is a full blooded Native American Indian. He was born in 1976 into the Navajo Nation. He began his interest in crafting pottery when he was 16 years old. Mr. Charlie was inspired by his mother, Susie Charlie, who is credited for developing this unique style of art. She taught her son how to paint the colors on the pottery, as well as etch his pottery free hand. Michael crafts on many  different shapes and sizes of pottery like wedding vases, seed pots, water vessels, and ollas. He etches feather designs and other geometric designs. His favorite pieces to craft are the ones he crafts with quality stones of turquoise inlayed into the pottery. Continuing long lived traditions is extremely important to Michael and by constructing his art he feels he is adding to the long lived legacy of his ancestors. The lucrative aspect of the business was also inspiration for him to become an artist. He signs his pottery as: Michael Charlie, Navajo

Michael is related to the following artists: Susie Charlie (mother), Terri Charlie (sister), Brandon Charlie and Myron Charlie  (brothers).

Check for work by this artist in our Pueblo Pottery section!

Charlie, Myron (Navajo) 

Myron Charlie is a full blooded Native American Indian. He was born into the Navajo Nation in 1975. He began his interest in crafting pottery when he was 14 years old, in 1985. Mr. Charlie was inspired by his mother, the well known Susie Charlie, credited for her etching on the popular navajo pottery. She taught her son how to paint the colors on the pottery, as well as etch his pottery free hand. Myron crafts all different shapes and sizes of pottery like wedding vases, seed pots, and other shapes of pottery. He etches feather designs and other geometric designs. His favorite pieces to craft are the ones he crafts with quality stones of turquoise inlayed into the pottery. Myron signs his art as: Myron H. Charlie, “Navajo”

Myron is related to the following artists: Susie Charlie (mother), Terri Charlie (sister), Brandon Charlie and Michael Charlie  (brothers).

Awards:

-1994 Santa Monica CA 1st place

-1995 Pomona CA 1st place

-1996 Torrance CA 1st place

-Several other awards

Check for work by this artist in our Horsehair Pottery section!

Chavarria, Denise (Santa Clara)

Denise is the daughter of well known potter Stella Chavarria and the granddaughter of famed potter Teresita Naranjo. Her work was reminiscent of Stella's and Teresita's for some years but in recent years she has developed her own characteristic style. She has entered Santa Fe Indian Market for many years and has won numerous awards. More information may be found in the Dillingham book "Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery" on page 229.

Check for work by this artist in our Santa Clara Pottery section!

Chavarria, Mildred (Santa Clara)

Mildred Chavarria, “Millie”, was born into the Santa Clara Pueblo back in 1946. She was inspired to make pottery by her mother Pablita Chavarria, who has won numerous awards. She began playing with clay at the age of 10, but didn’t spark much interest in pottery making until 1986.

Mildred specializes in the hand coiled and hand crafted, Santa Clara black on black pottery. She digs up her own clay from the sacred grounds within the Santa Clara Pueblo. She was taught how to mix clay, hand coil, shape, etch, fire, and polish her pottery the traditional way, outdoors. She enjoys carving elements of the earth or symbols of water serpents on her pottery. Mildred signs her pottery as: Millie Chavarria, Santa Clara, NM.

Mildred is also related to the following artists: Reycita Naranjo, Elizabeth Naranjo, Florence Browning, and Mary Singer.

 

Chavarria, Stella (Santa Clara)

Stella is the daughter of famed Santa Clara potter Teresita Naranjo who passed away in early 2000. Stella's pottery is very much influenced by that of her mother with the exception that Stella makes only black ware and works on a somewhat smaller scale than did Teresita. One could say that Stella makes quintessential Santa Clara black ware and receive little or no argument. Stella has two potting daughters who share in her style: Denise Chavarria and Sunday Chavarria.

Check for work by this artist in our Santa Clara Pottery section!

Chinana, Marie (Jemez)

Marie is a Jemez Pueblo artist who works with traditional methods. She uses all natural materials collected from the Jemez Pueblo. Marie specializes in a stone polished redware and then handpaints different designs that are significant to her. She is the daughter of Martha Toya and has 17 years of experience. She signs her pieces D & M Chinana because her husband often helps her with parts of the pottery making process.

Check for work by this artist in our Jemez Pottery section!

Chino, Corrine (Acoma)

Corrine Chino is a full blooded Native American Indian from the pueblo of Acoma. She was born in the late 1950’s. Corrine did not spark an interest in pottery making until she was 26 years old. Her mother, Edna Chino, encouraged and taught Corrine all the fundamentals of hand coiling pottery using traditional ancient methods. Edna also reinforced the importance of continuing the long lived family tradition of working with clay. Corrine was a natural when it came to hand coiling and hand painting pottery. Her painting has always been exquisite.

Corrine developed a very fine painting style of black on white fine line. Corrine will add a feather pattern to the top rim in a blue color at times to add a bit of flare. Corrine specializes in hand painting on greenware pottery. However, she is very knowledgeable when it comes to hand coiling pottery, just like her mother. Corrine was quoted as saying, “I just love to paint, it brings balance to my life.” Corrine signs her pottery as: Corrine Chino, Acoma. She is related to the following artisans: Brian Chino (brother), Jay Vallo (sister), and Judy Shields (sister).

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Guest Life New Mexico Magazine

-Mary Laura’s Southwestern Art Calendar

Awards:

-New Mexico State Fair 2nd Place

Check for work by this artist in our Acoma Pottery section!

Chino, Edna (Acoma)

Edna  G. Chino is a full blooded Native American Indian. She was born into the Acoma Pueblo in 1935. Edna is a member of the Eagle Clan. Frances Torivio taught Edna all the fundamentals of work with clay art and using the ancient traditional hand coiling methods at the age of fifteen.

Edna specializes in hand coiled traditional fineline design pottery. She gathers her clay from within the Acoma Pueblo along with natural slips and natural vegetation which is used for making the natural colors used to paint the designs. When the clay is cleaned Edna hand mixes it with sand and water to temper the clay and she begins the hand coiling process. She enjoys coiling the traditional olla shapes which were used for water and cooking by her ancestors. Once the pot has been formed she sets it out to dry and begins breaking up the plant life that she has gathered such as spinach plant which provided the black color, yucca stems are fashioned into brushes for painting, and flowers are used for color. When the pot is fully dry she begins to hand sand her pottery for a smooth finish. Then, she begins the hand painting process The Chino family is well known for their hand painted finelines and floral designs. Finally, once the painting has been complete and the paint has dried Edna fires her pottery the traditional way of her ancestors, outdoors. She signs her pottery as: Chino. She is related to: Clifford L. Garcia (father), Lita L. Garcia (mother), Josephine Sanchez, Virginia Victorino, Maxine Sanchez (sisters), Corrine Chino, Jeanette “Jay” Vallo (daughters), Kevin Chino, the late, Brian Chino (sons).

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

Awards:

-New Mexico State Fair 1st Place

Check for work by this artist in our Acoma Pottery section!

Chino, Keith (Acoma)

Born and Raised among the beautiful landscapes of Acoma New Mexico, Keith learned from generations of potters and artists. A graduate of Grants High School class of 1979, Keith continued his education in Lawrence Kansas, where he studied fine art at Haskell Indian College. There, he began a big change in media.

In the Mid 80's, he used the knowledge he acquired at Haskell to become a commercial printer. Working ten years for The Albuquerque Publishing Company, Keith's quest for knowledge and art only influenced him to manage Acoma pueblo's print shop. There, his skill with the press and love of art became his inspiration to become a full-time artist. Listening to his heart, and his ability to experiment with medias has only enhanced his pieces of art to award winning designs. Some of his awards include:                                     2nd   SWAIA 1990           2ND ITAE Ohio, 1991

1st CIM 1994                1st SWAIA 1995

1st NMSF 2000                 3rd NMSF 2000

1st NMSF 2001                1st NMSF 2001

 

Chino, Monica (Acoma)

Monica Chino is a full blooded Native American from the Acoma Pueblo. She was born in 1970. Monica was inspired by her mother, Emmalita Chino, to learn the art of pottery making. Emmalita taught Monica all the fundamentals of traditional pottery making. She also shared special techniques which Emmalita learned on her own, by trial and error. Monica seriously began making pottery at the age of 20. The lucrative aspect of the business also played a key roll in her becoming a fine artisan.

Monica specializes in handmade traditional pottery. She gathers natural pigments from within the Acoma Pueblo. Monica soaks the clay, grinds, cleans the clay for imperfections, mixes, hand coils, shapes, sands, polishes, paints, and fires her pottery, the traditional way, outdoors. She hand paints, without stencils or other means, intricate fine line patterns, some of which are borrowed from her mother. She also uses all natural paints derived from plants and minerals also found within her pueblo. Continuing the family tradition of pottery making is very important to her and it’s people like her that ensure its survival. Monica is related to the following artists: Marie Torivio (aunt), Loretta Garcia (aunt), and Rose Chino (aunt). Monica signs her pottery as: Monica Chino, Acoma, N.M. or M.C. Acoma, N.M. 

 

Chino, Myra (Acoma)

Myra Chino was born into the Acoma Pueblo in 1965. Myra was a self taught artist. She began painting at a the age of 15. Myra was inspired to continue the family tradition of painting on pottery from her ancestors. Myra was a natural gifted painter and she was also economically motivated to paint on pottery.

Myra specializes in hand painting fine line and star burst patterns on ceramic pottery. She paints a little dot on all four sides of the pots to break up the pottery into sections so that every side will be the same size of the starburst pattern. Thus, continuing the process throughout the pot. The end result is this wonderful eye dazzling, hand painted pottery that mystifies all who appreciate the art of fine line designs. Myra signs her pottery as: Myra Chino, Acoma, NM.

Myra is related to the following artists: Victoria Sarracino (sister) and Carla Vallo (sister-in-law).

Publication:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

 

Chino, Terrance (Acoma)

Terrance M. Chino, Sr. is a full blooded Native American Indian. He is a member of the Sun Clan and he was born in 1965 into the Acoma Pueblo. He learned the ancient traditional methods of working with clay art from his mother, the late, Evelyn L. Chino. She taught him all the fundamentals of where to gather clay and how to prepare and hand coil pottery. She also taught him the importance of continuing the long lived tradition of his ancestors.

Terrance gathers his clay, natural pigments, and vegetation from within the Acoma Pueblo. He cleans it for impurities and hand mixes it with sand and water to temper the clay. Then, he begins the hand coiling process, he prays and chants while he works on his pottery so that each piece is blessed. When he has completed the hand coiling and his pot has taken form  he sets them out to dry. While the pottery is drying he breaks down all his plants so that he may begin hand boiling colors for his masterpieces. He gathers plants such as spinach plant and wild flowers for this process. When his pottery is fully dried he sands each piece to a smooth finish and begins hand painting with the stem of a yucca plant which has been fashioned into a brush. He hand paints his favorite designs of checkerboards, flowers, mimbres, and sunfaces. Finally, Terrance fires his pottery the traditional way, outdoors. He signs his pottery as: Terrance M. Chino, Sr., Acoma, N.M. Terrance is related to: Terrance M. Chino, Jr. (son) Emil Chino, Jeffrey Chino, Sr., (brothers), Ilona Chino, Colleen Marian, Marlene Vallo, Idene Mariano (sisters), Ivan F. Chino (father), and the late, Evelyn L. Chino (mother).

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

Check for work by this artist in our Acoma Pottery section!

Chosa, Erna (Jemez)

Erna Chosa, “Broom Flower”, member of the Sun Clan, was born in 1959 into the Jemez Pueblo.  She was inspired to continue the family tradition of pottery making by her Grandmother, Sarah Collateta. In addition, the lucrative aspects of the business also motivated her. Erna has been making pottery since she was 19 years of age.

Erna chose to specialize in the Hopi traditional pottery instead of the Jemez styles. She learned all the fundamentals from watching others make their pottery. She enjoys making elegant and finely painted wedding vases best of all because of its ceremonial representation. Wedding vases have been a part of pueblo life for centuries. She also enjoys making seed pots. Erna hand coils her pottery the traditional way and she even fires her pottery outdoors. Erna signs her pottery as: E.C. Hopi-Tewa.

Erna is related to the following artists: Antonita Collateta (mother) and Kathleen Collateta (sister).

Awards:

-Jemez Art Show 1990 & 1992

-Eighth Northern Art Show 1988, 1989

  & 1991

-Santo Domingo Art Show 1992 & 1993

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

 

Claw, Reuel (Navajo)

Reuel “Ral” Claw is a full blooded Native American Indian. He was born in 1960 into the Navajo Nation, and was raised in Tuba City, AZ.  He married into the Nampeyo family (his wife is Carla Claw-Nampeyo). She is the granddaughter of the famous “Nampeyo”. Carla taught Ral all the fundamentals of hand coiling traditional Hopi pottery. She is a strong believer in continuing family traditions and encouraged him to learn the Hopi methods of pottery making. He has been working with clay since 1997.

Ral has crossed cultures and has developed his own unique style of art. He specializes in handmade Hopi pottery. However, his pottery represents the history of his Navajo people with some pertaining to the healing ceremonies, and others are stories of the Mountain People. Ral gathers his clay from within the Hopi Reservation along side of his wife. He cleans, mixes, hand coils, shapes, sands, paints, polishes, and fires his pottery, outdoors, with sheep dung. He paints contemporary styles of traditional warriors and healers on his pottery. He signs his pottery as: R. Claw, or Ral for short, followed by Navajo.

Ral is related to “Silver” John Claw, Jr. (father) known for his oil paintings.

 

Claw-Nampeyo, Carla (Hopi-Tewa)

Carla Claw Nampeyo, member of the Snow Clan, was born in 1975 into the Hopi-Tewa Reservation. Carla is one of the granddaughters of the famous “Nampeyo”.She learned the art of working with clay in 1984. Thomas Polacca was the greatest influence in pointing Carla in the right direction of the traditional Hopi ways. Thomas taught Carla all the fundamentals of traditional pottery making. The lucrative aspect of the business was also a great inspiration to her.

Carla specializes in handmade traditional and contemporary styled pottery. She gathers all of her materials, like natural pigments, from the grounds within the Hopi Reservation. She cleans, mixes, hand coils, shapes, sands, paints and fires her own pottery. On her contemporary pottery she uses a sharp object to carve out kachinas, warriors, clowns, and traditional designs. Carla, finally, polishes her masterpieces with a sacred stone which is passed down to her from other artisans, which is a valuable gift to be honored with. Carla signs her pottery as: Carla Nampeyo, Hopi.

Fannie Polacca (grandmother), Iris Youvella (aunt), Nolan Youvella (cousin), Gary Polacca (brother), and Adelle Lalo-Nampeyo are among some of the finest potters that Carla is related to.

Awards:

-Hopi Art Show

-Gallup Ceremonial

Publications:

-Hopi-Tewa Pottery 500 Artist Biographies

-Beyond Tradition

-Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery

-Southwestern Pottery 1999 Edition

Check for work by this artist in our Hopi Pottery section!

Collateta, Princeton (Hopi-Tewa, Jemez, Navajo)  

Prinston Collateta, “Drumming Boy”, was born in 1981. He is half Hopi-Tewa and part Navajo, and Jemez, member of the Sun Clan and Eagle Clan. Prinston began sculpting at the age of 7. He learned the art of sculpting on wood from his Father, Tom Collateta, Sr., and many other artists. Prinston also becomes more inspirational when he receives compliments on his carvings. This makes him want to continue to perfect his dolls even more.

Prinston specializes in hand carving Hopi kachina dolls from scratch. He strolls along the banks of the Rio Grande River, in search of good sizes of cotton wood root to carve his dolls from. He carves his dolls with just an ordinary pocket knife. He studies the wood that he finds then lets his imagination take over. He enjoys carving full bodied dolls like Eagle dancers and Sun face kachinas the most, because they represent his clans. Prinston signs his carvings as: P. Collateta, followed by a sunface along with the title of the kachina.

Prinston is related to the following artists: Tom Collateta, Jr., and Nero Collateta (brothers).

 

Awards:

-Polacca Day School 1st place

Check for work by this artist in our Kachinas section!

Concho, Carolyn (Acoma)

Carolyn is a fine Acoma potter noted for her colorful Mimbres designs done on variously shaped seedpots. A source of confusion for many is the fact that there are two completely unrelated "Lewis" families at Acoma Pueblo. One is the famous Lucy Lewis family, and the other is the Katherine Lewis family. Carolyn is a member of this latter family which includes the following sibling potters: Marilyn Henderson, Ray Rebecca Lucario, Diane Lewis, Bernard and Sharon Lewis, Carolyn Concho, Judy Lewis. This family comprises one of the best extended potting families in any pueblo. Carolyn has entered the Santa Fe Indian Market many times and has numerous First, Second and Third Place ribbons to show for her efforts.

Check for work by this artist in our Acoma Pottery section!

Coriz, Arthur and Hilda (Santo Domingo)

Arthur & Hilda Coriz are both prize winning, full blooded Native American Indians from the Santo Domingo Pueblo. Arthur was born in 1948 and deceased in winter of 1998. Hilda was born in 1949 and currently making pottery on her own. Arthur was a self taught artist. He observed his brother-in-law, Robert Tenorio and became inspired to learn the long lived tradition of working with clay. Hilda was coaxed by her brother, Robert Tenorio in the 1980’s to learn the art of working with clay. Continuing the traditions of their people are extremely important to them, and by working with clay they add to the long lived legacy of their people.

They specialize in handmade, hand painted traditional Santo Domingo pottery. They gather natural clays and other pigments from within the Santo Domingo Pueblo. They hand clean the clay, mix all the materials with water, and begin hand forming the pottery using the coiling method. When the product has been completed they set it out to dry. Once the pottery is dry they sand the finished product, they hand paint many different designs of birds, animals, flowers, and geometric designs with natural paints which they boil from pigments like spinach plant and honey bee wax. Finally, they fire their pottery the traditional way, outdoors. They sign their pottery as: Arthur & Hilda Coriz, followed by a hand etched pot. Paulita Pacheco (sister), Gilbert Pacheco (brother-in-law), Ione Coriz (daughter), Andrew Pacheco (nephew), Juanita Tenorio (mother), and Andrea Ortiz (grandmother) are among some of the artists they are related to.

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery

-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

-Collections of Southwestern Pottery

Awards:

-Too many to list

 

Coriz, Ava Marie (Santo Domingo)

Ava Marie “Cool-Ca-Ya” Coriz is a full blooded Native American Indian. She was born in 1948 into the Santo Domingo Pueblo. Ava is a member of the Antelope Clan. She was inspired to continue the long lived tradition of hand making jewelry from her ancestors. The lucrative aspect of the business also encouraged her to become a jewelry artist.

Ava specializes in constructing hand strung and hand ground beaded necklaces. She was taught all the fundamentals of working with raw nuggets of various stones at the age of 14. She learned the art of working with silver in 1969. Today, Ava combines her knowledge of stones and silver to construct the finest beaded necklaces, using quality stones in the process. Ava is related to: Rodney Coriz, Daniel Coriz (nephews), and Lupe Pena (father).

Awards:

-1997 New Mexico State Fair 2nd Place

-1996 New Mexico State Fair 3rd Place

-1995 New Mexico State Fair 2nd Place

Publications:

-New Mexico Magazine

 

Coriz, Joseph (Santo Domingo)

Joseph Coriz is an authentic Native American Indian.  He was born into the Santo Domingo Pueblo in 1958.  He was inspired to follow in the footprints of his parents where were very successful at making beautiful handmade jewelry, and Vidal Aragon  who was known for his fine silversmith petroglyph designs.  They taught him all the fundamentals of working with  beads  and raw silver at a very young age.  Joseph absorbed each piece of information with traditional hand crafted jewelry and eventually developed his own unique style.  He combined the traditional methods of hand crafting jewelry and added his own unique contemporary flare by creating his style primarily with authentic sterling silver designs.   He developed a great passion for hand crafting beautiful masterpieces of fine jewelry and is surely one of the finest master silversmiths of our time. 

The work of Joseph Coriz  is very distinctive and easily recognizable.  He works primarily with sterling silver, rolled heishi beads, turquoise, coral, and handmade silver beads.  With this combination of natural products and his dramatic stamp work he is able to allow his creativity take control and create some of the finest jewelry available today.  His colorful and innovative style is surely all his own.   His creations include rings, necklaces, bolos, pendants, bracelets, earrings, and concho belts.  Joseph stamps his masterpieces as Joseph Coriz, Santo Domingo Pueblo.

Awards:

-Santa Fe Indian Market

-Eight Northern Pueblo Art Show

-Colorado Springs Art Show

-New Mexico State Fair

-Heard Museum Art Show

 

Curran, Dolores (Santa Clara)

Dolores Curran is one of the finest potters in any Pueblo today. This fact was validated in 1993 when Dolores won "Best of Division" at the Santa Fe Indian Market. This means her pot was judged the finest of all the hundreds of pots entered that year. She is the daughter of the late potter Ursulita Naranjo and the sister of famed minaturist Geri Naranjo. She was married to the fine San Juan potter Alvin Curran who passed away in 1999. Dolores most typically works in the "cream on red" style. A little known fact is that she must paint each pot at least three times before the designs achieve the required degree of opacity. More information on Dolores Curran may be found in the Gregory Schaaf Book "Pueblo Indian Pottery - 750 Artist Biographies" on pages 18-19.

Check for work by this artist in our Santa Clara Pottery section!

Curtis, Manuel (Navajo)

Manuel Curtis was born in 1976 into the Navajo Nation. He was inspired to learn the process of hand making Navajo kachina dolls, by his friend, (Ronnie Foster), his creativity, and economic motivation also played a key roll. He began making his dolls in 1993 at the age of 17. He began by assisting Ronnie construct his Hopi kachina sculptures. He took the knowledge he acquired from him and came up with his own style of sculptures.

Manuel specializes in hand making the large Navajo kachina dolls. He takes strolls down by  the Rio Grande River in search of raw materials like cottonwood root to create his kachinas. Manuel accents his dolls with leather, feathers, bells, and uses acrylic paints to make his fine art. His favorite one to make is the koshare clown. Manuel signs his kachina dolls as: By Manuel Curtis, followed by the name of the kachina.

Manuel is related to Bernice Todicheenie (mother), who creates sand paintings.

 

Dallas, Tony (Hopi)

Tony Dallas is a full blooded Native American Indian. He was born in 1956 into the  Hopi Reservation. He married into the Cochiti Pueblo in the early 1980’s. He was inspired to learn the art of working with clay sculptures by observing his mother-in-law, Lucy R. Suina. He sparked an interest in working with clay at the age of 16.

               Tony seriously began making pottery in 1982. He learned all the ancient traditional methods of constructing pottery and clay sculptures. Finally, he decided that he really enjoyed making storytellers and continues to create a very unique contemporary style of art. He stated, “I started to hand coil a regular storyteller. Then, I thought for a moment. Mudheads and Koshare clowns also tell stories and they are so humorous to me. So I began experimenting with different styles of storytellers using my creative imagination to construct them”. Tony’s style is a finely painted contemporary flare on a traditional sculpture. He signs his art as: T.D. followed by a badger claw to denote his Clan origin.

Tony is related to the late Charles Loma.

Publications:

-The Pueblo Storyteller

-Miniature Arts of the Southwest

-Miniature Figures in Clay

-Storytellers and Other Figurative Pottery

-Hopi-Tewa Pottery 500 Artist Biographies

-Talking with the Clay

Awards:

-1999 New Mexico State Fair 3rd Place

-Santa Fe Indian Market various years

-Rio Grande Indian Market various years

-New Mexico State Fair various years

 

Dann-Lente Marquis (Laguna/Hopi)

Marquis Dann-Lente is a full blooded Native American Indian. He was born in 1970 and is a member of the Water Clan and a member of the Kachina Clan. He is half Hopi and half Laguna. Marquis was inspired to learn the art of  working with clay from Preston Duwyenie from the Hopi Reservation and May Chavez from the Acoma Pueblo. They taught Marquis all the fundamentals of constructing hand coiled pottery using the ancient traditional methods that were passed down from generation to generation. The lucrative aspect of the business was also inspiration for him to learn this unique style of art.

Marquis specializes in hand coiled and hand painted traditional pottery. He gathers his natural clumps of clay and he harvests his raw plants from within the reservation. He breaks down the the clumps of clay into a fine powder form and cleans the clay for impurities. Then, he hand mixes the clay with sand and water to temper the clay. He begins the hand coiling process by rolling the clay into snake like coils and begins building his pottery to his desired shape. Once his vessel has been formed it is set out to dry. He fashions a brush from a yucca stem with his teeth and he boils his raw plants for his desired natural colors to paint his vessels. Once the vessels are dry he sands them for a smooth finish. Then, he begins hand painting his favorite designs such as birds, finelines, rainbow bands, and geometric designs. Finally, he fires his pottery the traditional way, outdoors with cedar chips. He signs his pottery as: Lente, Laguna. He is related to: Floyd Dann, Jr. (father), and Sandra J. Lente (mother).

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

 

Daubs, Dennis (Jemez/San Ildefonso)

Dennis Daubs, “Oboweya” (Early morning runner before the kachina dance), was born in 1960. He is half Jemez and half San Ildefonso, member of the Eagle Clan. Dennis was inspired to make pottery from his Great Grandmother Maria Sanchez and his Grandmother Elvira Gachupin. At the age of 18 he started gathering his own clay and experimenting with pottery making.

Dennis specializes in the handmade sgraffito red or black polished pottery. He mixes his own clay, hand coils, shapes, etches, fires, and polishes his own pottery, the traditional way, outdoors. His sgraffito etchings usually include a detailed etched kachina dancer, animals or various shapes of geometrical designs on the different shapes of pots he coils. Dennis stated that “I use a different design on every piece of pottery that I make and each one is a challenging and rewarding one to complete.” Dennis signs his pottery as: Dennis Daubs, Jemez Pueblo. He is also a distant relative to the famous Maria Martinez.

Dennis is related to the following artists: Gerri Gachupin (mother), Patricia Daubs (sister), and the late, Steve Daubs (brother).

Awards:

-The Mart in Denver 1979

-Santa Fe Indian Market 1982 & 1984

-Eighth Northern Art Show 1986

-Las Vegas Art Show 1987

-New Mexico State Fair

-Other awards won too numerous to list

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

-Miniature Arts of the Southwest

 

Daubs, Gerri (Jemez/San Ildefonso)

Gerri “Gachupin” Daubs is a full blooded Native American Indian. She was born in 1935 into the small but active Pueblo of Jemez, New Mexico. She is a member of the Eagle Clan, which was passed down from her mother, Elvira Gachupin. Early schooling brought Gerri in contact with Al Momaday, Kiowa artist and teacher. Momaday nurtured young Gerri. Natural talent guided her art and design in the early years. Gerri’s grandmother, Maria Sanchez-Colaque was from the San Ildefonso Pueblo and first cousin to Maria Martinez, the famous master of the black San Ildefonso pottery. Gerri’s grandmother gave her the hands on experience of working with natural clay. She taught her all the fundamentals of hand coiling pottery using ancient traditional methods in the process, which was passed down to her from her ancestors.

Gerri’s work is exhibited in Red River and Raton, New Mexico. She also participates in several art shows throughout Arizona. In the last few years her work has appeared in collections all over the world and her reputation as an exceptional pottery artist is well deserved.

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Pueblo Indian Pottery 750 Artist Biographies

 

Daubs, Patricia (Jemez/San Ildefonso)

Patricia Daubs, “Turquoise Flower”, member of the Eagle Clan was born in 1963 into the Jemez. She began learning the art of working with clay at the age of 12. Her brother, the late Steve Daubs, inspired her to continue the family tradition of pottery making. The lucrative aspect of the business also played a key role in her becoming an artist.

Patricia specializes in contemporary authentic hand-coiled pottery. She gathers her materials like sand, clay, and pigments from within the hills of the Jemez Pueblo. Patricia cleans, mixes, shapes, hand-coils, paints, and fires her pottery the traditional way, outdoors, with cedar wood chips. Her designs normally include feathers, kiva steps, and serpents. She also accents her pottery with turquoise stones to give it a unique style. Patricia’s pottery radiates tranquility. She signs her pottery as: Patricia Daubs, Jemez Pueblo, New Mexico. She is related to the following artists Dennis Daubs (brother), Gerri Daubs (mother), and the late Steve Daubs (brother).

 

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

 

 

David, Anthony (Hopi/Navajo)

Anthony David was born in 1965. He is half Hopi and half Navajo. He grew up in Winslow, AZ and he was inspired to learn the art of carving by his friend, Richard Gorman. Richard taught Anthony the fundamentals of carving on wood. Anthony has been carving on wood since 1989, at the age of 22. The lucrative aspect of the business also played a key roll in his inspiration to become an artisan.

With a simple tool like a pocket knife, materials like cottonwood root, acrylic paint, and an artists imagination, Anthony can transform a simple chunk of wood into spectacular images of full bodied spiritual kachinas. Kachinas are believed to be the spiritual guardians of the Indian way of life. There are over 300 known Kachinas from the Hopi Reservation alone. In ancient times, Hopi kachinas were used in religious ceremonies and were believed to bless and watch over the Hopi People. It is essential to represent a kachina doll as accurately as possible, for they are highly respected. Many of the dolls carved by Anthony are one continuous piece of wood, which is a difficult task to accomplish. His favorite doll to carve is the Eagle Kachina because of the highly detailed work involved. He enjoys the challenge of carving the feathers on the same piece of wood. Anthony signs his dolls as: A*David.

 

Davis, Genevieve (Jemez)

Genevieve is from the Jemez Pueblo where she makes incredible pieces of pottery. She is best known for her detailed Owls. Gen uses all natural materials when making her pottery and uses the traditional Jemez Pueblo methods to hand form and hand paint all of her pieces. She signs each piece G. Davis Jemez.

 

Dawahoya, Gene (Hopi)

Gene Dawahoya is a Hopi Katsina carver from Hopi 2nd Mesa. He is the brother of Nuvadi Dawahoya. Gene is a noted artist who has received many awards for his work. His Katsinas are often carved of a single piece of cottonwood root, and feature natural paints. His stunning Katsinam are coveted by collectors for their intricate detail. Gene is known to carry on the tradition of Traditional Katsina Dolls including Eagle Dancers, Warrior Maidens and more.

 

Dawahoya, Nuvadi (Hopi)

Nuvadi Dawahoya is a young Kachina carver from Hopi 2nd Mesa. He is among the most well-known contemporary Hopi carvers of our time. He also has amassed a large number of awards including 1st place at the Indian Arts and Crafts Association show in 2000, 2nd at the Santa Fe Indian Market 1999, Haskell merit award 1999, and 1st place at the Albuquerque Indian Market 2000. He is most well known for his Warrior mouse, and Sunface Katsinas. He recently won the Southwestern Indian Art Fair's Award of Excellence for his representation of Nataska, a disciplinary Katsina. His carvings, done entirely with a knife, and most time of a single piece of cottonwood root are intricately detailed. Nuvadi is from Shungopavi.  His work is coveted by collectors today, and destined to appreciate in value in the future.

 

Duywenie, Preston (Hopi)

Preston Duywenie is a Hopi, born on the reservation, raised in Scottsdale, AZ, and currently living at Santa Clara Pueblo. He is married to Debra Trujillo Duywenie who makes fine sgrafitto pottery. Before the untimely death of Harvey Chavarria, she and Harvey collaborated as potters under the name Debra Harvey. Preston attended the IAIA school in Santa Fe where he studied virtually all of the crafts. He is a painter, sculptor, jeweler and potter. It is as a potter and jeweler that he became most well known and although presently he is only potting, he frequently uses his jewelry skills by incorporating silver ingots into his pottery. His strikingly original and unique pieces have won many awards including "Best of Show" at the prestigious Heard Museum Show in 1996. At the same show in 1997, he again won "Best in Pottery" -- with a different group of judges. At the 1997 Santa Fe Indian Market, Preston won two First places as well as a "Challenge Award". He is one of the finest potters working in any pueblo today.

Check for work by this artist in our Hopi Pottery section!

Early, Max (Laguna)

Max Early was born in 1963 into the Laguna Pueblo. His mother is of the Turkey Clan and his father is of the Bear Clan. Max married into the Cochiti Pueblo and has 3 children. His interest in tradition began when he was a teenager living with his grandparents. Max was never encouraged to actually work with clay since his grandmother, Clara Acoya Encino, emphasized that pottery making was a woman’s job. It was, however, acceptable for Max to assist with painting his grandmother’s pottery. He began doing this when she developed arthritis and could no longer paint. He eventually moved away to attend college and his interest in pottery lay dormant for nearly 10 years.

He began painting ceramic ware as a hobby, but couldn’t feel any life in the commercial pieces. He decided to venture out on his own. He knew where to gather raw materials and set out, with determination, to make a large olla. Once complete, Max called on a fellow potter, Gladys Paquin, and asked her teach him how to fire pottery. His first olla survived the firing and Max took the success as a sign that he was destined to become an artisan.

With only a handful of traditional potters existing in the Laguna Pueblo, Max knew what his obligation to his Pueblo would be. Max says that he first learned to make drums and moccasins. However, drum and moccasin makers were a dime a dozen. His decision to change over to traditional pottery came from his desire to help save the art of pottery making within his pueblo from extinction. Max is encouraging his children to continue the pottery making tradition. Max’s goal to become a mentor for his people will fulfill his ambition to keep the tradition alive and endure for future generations to come.

 

Awards:

-Santa Fe Indian Market consecutively since 1994-1998 1st, 2nd, and 3rd places

-New Mexico State Fair 1995 4th premium

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Santa Fe Indian Market August 1998

-Singing the Clay: Pueblo Pottery of the SW

-SWAIA American Indian News, July 1995

-Indian Artist, Spring 1995

-New Mexico Magazine, August 1994

-Pueblo Artist Portraits

-The Native American Indian Artist Directory

-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

-Trading Post Guide Book

-Acoma and Laguna Pottery

Permanent Collections:

-Cincinnati Art Museum, Cincinnati, OH

-Indian Pueblo Cultural Center, Albuq. NM

-Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, Museum of NM, Santa Fe, NM

-San Diego Museum of Man, San Diego C.A.

Galleries:

-Andrea Fisher Gallery, Santa Fe, NM

-Robert Nichols Gallery, Santa Fe, NM

-Rio Grande Indian Wholesale, Albuq. NM 

Eckleberry, Naomi (Santa Clara)

In 1981 Victor moved to Santa Clara Pueblo where he observed his aunts (Mary Cain and Mida Tafoya) making pottery. Nonetheless, he considers himself largely self-taught. Naomi was born in Los Angeles (1961) to a non-Indian father and a Santa Clara mother (Patricia Fuentes). She moved to Santa Clara in 1984, met Victor, and they started potting together. She was taught by her brother Lorenzo Fuentes. Victor and Naomi form their pots independently as each has special shapes. Naomi designs the pots but Victor carves them. Then Naomi does the polishing and Victor the firing. Truly a collaborative effort. : They won two First Places at the most recent Picuris show. More information is available in the Fourteen Families book page 236.

Check for work by this artist in our Santa Clara Pottery section!

Estevan, Berleen (Acoma)

Berleen Estevan is a full blooded Native American Indian. She was born into the Acoma Pueblo in 1975. She has been working with pottery since 1985, at the age of 10. She was inspired to learn the process of pottery making by her Grandmother, the late, Lucy Juanico. Lucy taught Berleen all the fundamentals of pottery making the traditional way. Berleen has invented her own unique style of pottery.

Berleen specializes in hand painted greenware and hand coiled pottery. She hand paints kokopelli, animals, mimbres designs, and angels on many different shapes of pottery. Berleen hand coils traditional pottery and hand paints her unique patterns. She gathers her raw pigments from within the Acoma Pueblo and uses ancient traditional methods to construct her pottery. However, she really enjoys painting on ceramic pottery most of all. The first piece Berleen ever made was a bread oven, which she was so proud of. Berleen signs her pottery as: B. Estevan, Acoma, N.M.

Berleen is related to the following artists: The famous Dorothy Torivio (aunt) and Charlene Estevan.

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

Check for work by this artist in our Acoma Pottery section!

Estevan, Jennifer and Patricio, Michael (Acoma)

Jennifer M. Estevan and Michael Patricio are a couple that have teamed up to hand coil a very unique style of pottery. Jennifer was born in 1963, Michael was born in 1968. They were both born into the Acoma Pueblo. Jennifer began experimenting with pottery making at the age of 14. She was inspired to continue the family tradition of pottery making by her Mother, Virginia Estevan, who taught her all the essentials for pottery making. Jennifer and Michael contribute equally to the hard work it takes to make their intricate detailed pottery.

They specialize in the handmade traditional Acoma pottery, designed with lightning bolt patterns, which is referred to as the Anasazi design. All of the ingredients are borrowed from Mother Earth, including the colors derived from natural pigments. They hand coil a wide variety of shapes and sizes, however, Jennifer enjoys making the original olla style the best. Jennifer signs their pottery as: J. Estevan, Acoma, NM.

Jennifer is related to the following artists: Yvonne Estevan (sister) and Joe Estevan (brother).

Awards:

-Gallup Inter-Tribal Ceremonies 2nd place

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

Check for work by this artist in our Acoma Pottery section!

Eteeyan, Kimberly (Jemez/Potowatomie)

Kimberly Eteeyan is a full blooded Native American Indian, she was born in 1964. She is half Jemez and half Potowatomie. Kimberly was inspired to hand coil clay sculptures and storytellers by many other artists, her creativity, and she was also economically motivated to continue a long lived tradition. Kimberly has been experimenting with pottery making since the age of 20. Kimberly was quoted as saying, “I just wanted to create my own style of art.”

Kimberly specializes in handmade storytellers and clay sculptures, but does not limit her abilities. She can also hand coil pottery the traditional way. She gathers her clay from the grounds within the Jemez Pueblo. Kimberly also grinds, sifts, hand mixes, and hand shapes her pottery on her own. She paints using all natural colors provided to her by the natural pigments found within the Jemez Pueblo, and finally, she fires her pottery in a kiln. Kimberly signs her pottery as: KE-Jemez.

Kimberly is related to Mary Louise Eteeyan (mother), another one of the well known potters around today.

Awards:

-New Mexico State Fair Honorable mention

-New Mexico State Fair 3rd place

-New Mexico State Fair 4th place

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

 

Eteeyan, Mary Louise (Jemez)

Mary Louise Eteeyan is a full blooded Native American Indian. She was born into the Jemez Pueblo in 1942. She was inspired to learn the art of pottery making, by observing several of her friends hand coil their pottery. She began experimenting with pottery making in 1978 at the age of 34.

Mary Louise specializes in the handmade Jemez style butterfly bowls with lids. She also hand coils wedding vases and various shapes of pottery. Mary gathers her own clay from the grounds within the Pueblo. Then, she soaks the clay, grinds, sifts, cleans, mixes, hand coils, shapes, hand paints, and fires her pottery the traditional way, outdoors. Mary Louise uses all natural pigments to construct  her pottery. Her coiling and painting skills are among one of the most precise around today. Mary signs her pottery as: Mary Louise Eteeyan, Jemez.

Mary is related to the following artists: Anna Marie Sendo (mother) and Kimberly Eteeyan (daughter).

 

Awards:

-New Mexico State Fair 1st place

-Eighth Northern Arts & Crafts Show 1st place

-Gallup Indian Ceremonials

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Featured Artist in Southwest Magazine

Check for work by this artist in our Jemez Pottery section!

Etsate, Bev (Zuni)

Beverly Etsate is an acclaimed Zuni Inlay Artist. Bev is the Daughter of Famed Zuni Artists Rosalie and Augustine Pinto. Bev continues her parents tradition of Inlaid Jewelry by producing jewelry in the same style as her Elders. She has over 30 years of experience in her craft. In that time, she has quickly become one of Zuni's foremost Jewelers.

 

Etsitty, Rick (Navajo)

Rick Etsitty is a full blooded Native American Indian. He was born into the Navajo Nation in 1963. He began crafting his pottery  in 1994, at the age of 28. He was inspired to craft his pottery by observing his sister, Ella Morgan She is also a well known pottery artist.

Rick specializes in the Navajo etched pottery. He paints the pottery using multi colors, and hand etches many different patterns and designs. Then, he fires the pottery in a kiln. Rick hand carves animals or kokopelli (god of fertility) designs on his different shaped pottery. He crafts many different sizes of pottery. Rick signs his pottery as: ME Dine RE, followed by the year it was etched.

Rick is also related to the following artists: Emma Etsitty, Peggy Etsitty, Etta Morgan, and Ida James (sisters).

Awards:

-1998 New Mexico State Fair 2nd place

Publications:

-Mary Laura’s calendar

 

Fendor, Erik (Santa Clara)

Erik Fender, Than Tsideh “Sunbird”,  was born in 1970 into the San Ildefonso Pueblo.  He specializes in traditional and contemporary blackware pottery.

He started the art of pottery making by watching his grandmother, Carmelita Dunlap, as she would hand coil and hand paint her traditional black -on-black pottery.  As he grew older, he started to experiment more with various techniques and clays.  His style progressed from the traditional black-on-black pottery to an innovated two tone, black-on-red, separated by sgraffito low relief carving.  He also makes beautiful polychrome pots and presently he specializes in green-on-black pots.  He harvests his clumps of raw clay from the sacred grounds within the San Ildefonso Pueblo, then, Erik breaks the clumps of clay to a fine powder substance and mixes it with volcanic ash and water, once that process is complete he hand coils snake like forms and begins to construct his vessel.  When the vessel is built it is set out to dry. Once it has dried he sands it down to smooth out the surface. He stone polishes and hand paints his designs with all natural paints which are all boiled from native vegetation grown in the Pueblo.  He is related to Martha Appleleaf Fendor (mother), Carmelita Dunlap (grandmother), Linda Dunlap (aunt), Jeannie Mountain Flower Dunlap (aunt), and Carlos Dunlap (grandfather). He signs his pottery as Than Tsideh which means “Sunbird”.

Awards:

-1987 New Mexico Congressional Art First Place

-1988 Santa Fe Indian Market First Place

-1998 Santa Fe Indian Market Honorable Mention

Publications:

-Pueblo Indian Pottery 750 Artist Biographies

-Pueblo Artists Portraits

 

Foley, Gordon (Jemez/Oto-Missouria)

Gordon Foley, “Middle of the Plaza”, was born in 1975 into the Jemez Pueblo; he is also Oto-Missouria. The lucrative aspect of the business was partially responsible for his inspiration. However, he was also inspired from his elders to learn the art of pottery making. As a child, Gordon would assist other members of his Pueblo to hand coil their pottery and observe their methods, with a careful eye, and gather knowledge so that one day he to would be able to make beautiful art of his own.

Gordon specializes in hand coiled contemporary styled pottery, but he is not limited to just that he also has made clay sculptures. All of his pottery is made from Mother Earth which is gathered around his home within the Jemez Pueblo. Then, he mixes the clay with white sand. Gordon uses the traditional coiling method to form each piece of pottery. Before the pottery dries he will form ribs around the exterior part of the pot. Once the Pottery is dried, he sands the pot around each rib with sand paper. Next, he applies the paint and then adds a finishing polish to the pottery. Finally, he will fire the pottery outdoors with cedar wood, which is the traditional way of potting. Gordon signs his pottery as: Gordon Foley, Jemez.

Gordon is related to many famous potters among them are following artists: Laura Gachupin (mother), Marie G. Romero (Grandmother), Bertha Gachupin (godmother), Maxine Toya (aunt), and Damian Toya (cousin).

Awards:

-1984 Santa Fe Indian Market 1st & 2nd Place

-1993 Santa Fe Indian Market 1st

-1997 Gallup Ceremonial 2nd Place

-1999 New Mexico State Fair 3rd Place

-1999 New Mexico State Fair 4th Place

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

 

Fragua, BJ (Betty Jean) (Jemez)

This young potter is the daughter of Juanita Fragua, one of the potters responsible for the renaissance of Jemez pottery. B J works in a style somewhat reminiscent of her mother's but it has a more contemporary feel. She is one of the best young potters to emerge from Jemez Pueblo in recent years and many awards testify to this fact. B J also has a sister, Glendora Fragua, who is a also a very talented and recognized potter and a brother, Clifford Fragua, one of the best known Indian sculptors. She is a member of a very talented family.

Check for work by this artist in our Jemez Pottery section!

Fragua, Chrislyn (Jemez)

Chrislyn Fragua is a 29 year old Native American potter from the reservation of Jemez Pueblo. She has been making pottery, storytellers and other figures since the age of twelve. Her mother Linda Lucero-Fragua took the time to teach her how to make pottery and taught her to get the clay from the hills of Jemez. She is now passing the skills on to her daughter, Anissa Tsosie.

The clays and paint the Jemez potters use come from the surrounding areas of Jemez Pueblo so everything they use in the process of making the pottery is natural. Her favorite part of making pottery is doing the formation. Once she starts working with the clay she doesn't know what she will be forming and she usually gets different ideas. She has won a couple of ribbons from the Eight Northern Art Shows and plans to accomplish more in the near future.

Check for work by this artist in our Jemez Pottery section!

Fragua, Clifford Kim (Jemez)

Clifford Kim Fragua is a full blooded Native American Indian from the Jemez Pueblo. He was born in 1957 and has been hand making pottery sculptures since 1970. He was inspired to learn the art of clay sculpting from his Mother, the late Grace L. Fragua.

              Clifford specializes in handmade storytellers, humorous koshares (ceremonial clowns), animals figurines, nativity’s, Christmas ornaments, and corn maidens. The materials that Clifford uses consist of native clay and temper found around the Jemez Pueblo. Natural clay is also used as colors to paint each piece. The clay and sand is prepared by drying, grinding, and sifting before it is mixed with water to produce the medium (weight of clay). The sculptures are then hand pinched, air dried, painted, and wood fired. The major portion of each sculpture is hollow. The end product is a natural tan-buff color where it is not painted. His work is a unique blend of the traditional and contemporary styles, producing one of a kind pieces. Emily Fragua-Tsosie, Bonnie Fragua, and Carol Fragua-Gachupin (sisters) are among the artists that Clifford is related to.

Awards:

-1992 Gallup Ceremonial 1st place

-1992 Totah Farmington Festival 2nd & 3rd

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Storytellers and Other Figurative Pottery

 

Fragua, Felicia (Jemez)

Felicia is an incredibly talented artist from the Jemez Pueblo, and a member of the renowned Fragua family. Her mother and sisters began teaching her the art of pottery making at the age of 13. She is well known for her wide variety of storytellers and other figures like koshares, mudheads, horse riders and nativity sets.

Felicia hand coils each piece of pottery using all natural clays from around the Jemez Pueblo. Her stone polishing technique is top notch, and each piece is extremely smooth to the touch. Lately she has been adding petroglyph designs to her pots for an added touch of the southwest, a practice that has been well received by collectors and tourists alike. She signs her work as F. Fragua.

Check for work by this artist in our Jemez Pottery section!

Fragua, Glendora (Jemez)

Glendora Fragua (formerly known as Glendora Daubs) is the finest creator of Jemez sgrafitto-style pottery. Her work is continuously evolving and improving, a fact which was recognized in 1997 when she won the "Best of Pottery" award at the Gallup Indian Ceremonial. She is the daughter of well known Jemez potter Juanita Fragua and her siblings are potter BJ Fragua and sculptor Clifford Fragua.

 

Fragua, Joseph (Jemez)

Joseph Fragua is a full blooded Native American Indian. He was born into the Jemez Pueblo in 1977. Joseph was inspired to learn the art of working with natural clay by assisting Sharon Sarracino construct her pottery. Sharon shared with Joseph all the fundamentals of working with clay and using the ancient traditional methods of hand coiling just like their ancestors before them. Joseph was quoted as saying: “I enjoy working with clay because it is a part of me that I am giving to the world, and the reactions on the faces of those who admire my work inspire me to become more creative with my ideas”.

Joseph specializes in contemporary hand coiled pottery. He gathers his raw clumps of clay from within the Jemez Pueblo. He breaks down the clumps of clay and cleans the fine sands of clay for impurities. Then, Joseph hand mixes the clay with sand and water, then, he begins the hand coiling process by rolling the clay into snake like coils and begins hand building a clay vessel. Once the vessel is built he sets the piece out to dry, this is a crucial stage because if it dries to quickly the vessel may crack. Once the vessel has dried, he sands his piece down to give it a smooth finish. Then, he begins the painting process with a stem of a yucca plant that has been fashioned into a brush. His designs include flowers hummingbirds, butterflies, eagle feathers, and intricate geometric designs. He on occasion with hand sculpt a kachina maiden with a beautiful head dress on his pottery. Finally, when the painting is done he fires his pottery in a kiln so that the painting doesn’t rub off. Joseph enjoys hand coiling all types of clay art. He accepts new challenges eagerly. He signs his pottery as: Fragua, Jemez. He is related to: Margaret Toya (grandmother).

Awards:

-New Mexico State Fair

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

Check for work by this artist in our Jemez Pottery section!

Fragua, Juanita (Jemez)

Juanita Fragua is one of the foremost potters responsible for the renaissance pottery. She has been making traditional pottery for over 25 years, beginning at a time when sun-dried poster-painted pottery was the norm at Jemez Pueblo. Her beautiful stone-polished pottery has brought her recognition and blue ribbons at shows all over the country. She also has two very talented potting daughters: Glendora Fragua and B J Fragua. Her son, Clifford Fragua, is one of the best known Indian sculptors. All in all, a very talented family inspired by the vision of Juanita.

Check for work by this artist in our Jemez Pottery section!

Fragua, Linda (Jemez)
Linda Lucero Fragua lives in Jemez Pueblo, New Mexico with her husband, Phillip, who is also a potter.  Linda was born into the Lucero family, daughter to Joe and Rebecca,  another famous potting family of Jemez, before she married into the renowned Fragua family.  The exceptionally beautiful storytellers and babies with their expressive eyes and precious animated faces are easily identified as Linda's work.  Her storytellers are so loved they literally live all over the world.  In spite of her worldwide fame, though, Linda and Phillip continue to live a simple life in the pueblo of their ancestors, potting almost everyday.  Linda's work can be seen in Pueblo and Navajo Contemporary Pottery by Guy Berger and Nancy Schiffer.

Check for work by this artist in our Jemez Pottery section!

Fragua, Matthew (Jemez)

Matthew E. Fragua, “Spotted Eagle”, is a full blooded Native American Indian. He was born into the Jemez Pueblo in 1963. He began experimenting with clay at the age of 16, in 1978. His inspiration was his Great Grandmother, Persingula Gachupin. She taught him all the fundamentals of constructing clay sculptures using ancient traditional methods which were passed down from generation to generation.

Matthew specializes in hand making koshare storytellers, horses, figurines and he can hand coil pottery. Matthew digs up his own clay, cleans, mixes, molds, paints, and fires his pottery, the traditional way, outdoors. He uses all natural colors and clays. Matthew signs his pottery as: M. Fragua, Jemez. Matthew is related to the following artists: Marie Romero (aunt), Laura Gachupin (cousin), and the famous Maxine Toya (cousin).

Awards:

-New Mexico State Fair

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

 

Fragua, Melinda Toya (Jemez)

 

Melinda is the award winning daughter of Mary E. Toya and the sister of Marie Toya. She specializes in storytellers, nativities, koshares and friendship pots. Born in 1959, she has been making pottery for over 25 years. She was taught by her mother and is a member of the very active Toya and Fragua potting families and and has been featured in the book "Pueblo and Navajo Contemporary Pottery"  By Guy Berger and Nancy Schiffer.

Check for work by this artist in our Jemez Pottery section!

 

Fragua, Phillip (Jemez)
 

Phillip Fragua lives in Jemez Pueblo, New Mexico with his wife Linda Lucero Fragua . Rose, another Jemez potter, and Phillip Fragua are brother and sister. Linda and Phillip continue to live a simple life in the pueblo of their ancestors, potting almost everyday.  Phillip's work can be seen in Pueblo and Navajo Contemporary Pottery by Guy Berger and Nancy Schiffer on page 83.

 

Fragua, Virginia (Jemez)

Virginia Fragua, “Ponca Flower” is a full blooded Native American Indian. She is a member of the Corn Clan and was born into the Jemez Pueblo in 1961. She was inspired to continue the long lived family tradition of hand coiling pottery, using ancient traditional methods at the age of 16. Her inspiration came from her grandmother, Persingula M. Gachupin. They developed a very close relationship during this time. She taught her all the fundamentals of working with clay. Virginia also helped her mother paint her pottery when she was a child.

Virginia specializes in hand coiled melon styled pottery. She was taught where to gather her clay, clean it, mix, hand coil, shape, add melon ridges, paint, and fire her pottery the traditional way, outdoors, with cedarwood chips. She also polishes her pottery to a nice shine. She really enjoys the challenge of hand making all different sizes and shapes. All of her pottery has a corn symbol hand painted on it to denote her Clan origin. Virginia signs her pottery as: V.P. Fragua, Jemez.

Virginia is related to the following artists: Lenora G. Fragua (mother), Marie G. Romero (aunt), Bertha Gachupin (sister), Damian Toya (cousin), Camillia Toya (cousin) and the famous Maxine Toya (aunt).

Awards:

-1990 New Mexico State Fair

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Southwestern Pottery 1999 Edition

 

Fragua-Tsosie, Emily (Jemez)

Emily Fragua-Tsosie, “Corn Pollen”, was born in 1951 into the Pueblo of the Jemez. Emily was inspired by her mother and grandmother to hand coil and pinch clay sculptures, at the age of 12. They encouraged and motivated her to learn the art of working with clay so that she could add to the long lived tradition of constructing art, using ancient methods.

Emily was taught where to gather the clay, clean, sift, shape, mold, paint, and fire her pottery, outdoors. By the late 1960’s she started making her own corn dolls and other sculptures. People often ask what her favorite type of art to make is and she replys, “Everything I create is a favorite piece because I created it.” Emily specializes in storytellers and corn maidens. She signs her pottery as: E. Fragua Tsosie, Jemez.

Emily is related to the following artists: Leonard Tsosie (husband), Rose Fragua, Chris Fragua, and Caroline Gachupin.

Awards:

-Santa Fe Indian Market 2nd place

-Santa Fe Indian Market 3rd place

-Eighth Northern Indian Arts 1st place

-Other awards too numerous to list

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Storytellers and Other Figurative Pottery

-Pueblo Family Pottery

Check for work by this artist in our Jemez Pottery section!

Gachupin, Bertha (Jemez)

Bertha Gachupin , “Thunder Flower”, was born into the Jemez Pueblo in 1954. She is a full blooded Native American Indian, member of the Zia and Corn Clan. Bertha was inspired to learn the art of making pottery by her Grandmother, Persingula Gachupin. She was also inspired artistically and economically to continue the family tradition of hand coiling pottery.

 Bertha specializes in handmade corn stalk pottery. She has continued to use only traditional methods to make her pottery and has mastered the hand coiling, stone polish, and traditional firing needed to perfect her pottery. Bertha’s unique style is to use a buff or red slip on the pottery , then applies melon swirls that are carved into the her pottery. She then accents the finished product with corn painted designs to denote her clan origin. The pottery is then hand polished after firing. Bertha signs her pottery as: Bertha Gachupin, Jemez, followed by a corn symbol.

Marie Romero(aunt), Lenora Fragua (mother), Maxine Toya (cousin), Laura Gachupin (cousin), and Virginia “Ponca” Fragua (sister) are among many of the artists that Bertha is related to.

Awards:

-1995 New Mexico State Fair 2nd Place

-1994 New Mexico State Fair 4th Place

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

Check for work by this artist in our Jemez Pottery section!

Gachupin, Joseph (Jemez)

Joseph Gachupin is a full blooded Native American Indian. He was born in 1953 into the Jemez Pueblo. He was inspired to learn the art of working with clay using ancient traditional methods from his wife, Caroline Gachupin. His sister-in-law, Emily Tsosie taught Joseph all the fundamentals of working with natural pigments found within the Jemez Pueblo. She also taught him special methods to apply when constructing his masterpieces of art. The lucrative aspect of the business also was inspiration for him to continue the long lived legacy of working with clay. When Joseph first began constructing his art he was occasionally teased about doing women’s work until he became more successful and won more awards for his accomplishments.

Joseph specializes in hand pinched and hand molded corn maidens and corn sculptures. He gathers his clay, soaks the clay, screens for impurifications, hand mixes with other pigments, hand pinches each kernel of corn, hand shapes, hand paints, and fires outdoors, with cedar chips. The paints are all derived from natural plants and minerals which are collected and boiled together by Joseph. He signs his art as: J.R. Gachupin, Jemez.

 Awards:

-New Mexico State Fair 1st Place

-New Mexico State Fair 2nd Place

-Denver Arts and Crafts Show

-Dallas Arts and Crafts Show

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Storytellers and Other Figurative Pottery

 

Gachupin, Laura (Jemez)

Laura is undoubtedly one of the finest potters to emerge from Jemez Pueblo in the past 25 years. Laura's mother, Marie G. Romero, was one of the people responsible for the renaissance in Jemez pottery in the 1970s. For many years Jemez has produced only sun-dried. poster-painted pottery of low quality. In the 1970s, Marie, with a few other potters, began to make traditional pueblo pottery in terms of technique but with unique styles due to the fact that there was not any traditional "Jemez" style. Laura benefited from her mother's guidance and took Jemez pottery to new heights of styles and quality. Much of what pottery is produced at Jemez today is derivative of Laura's work. She has won many, many awards at numerous shows and remains one of the most sought after of Jemez potters.

Check for work by this artist in our Jemez Pottery section!

Gachupin, Rebecca (Jemez)

Born November 17, 1955 to Andrea Tsosie. Rebecca has been working with pottery for 12 years. She combines the designs from the Zia Pueblo with those of her home, Jemez Pueblo. She does not enter her work for competition.

 

Gachupin, Wilma (Jemez)

Wilma M. Gachupin, “Sacred Rock Basket”, is a full blooded Native American Indian, born into the Pueblo of the Jemez, in 1957. Wilma was inspired to learn the art of pottery making by her brother, Kenneth Sando. She has been working with clay since the age of 28.

Wilma specializes in the natural hand coiled and hand painted storytellers, nativity’s, and corn maidens. However, she was  taught all the fundamentals of hand coiling pottery. Wilma gathers clay and other natural pigments within the Jemez Pueblo, and cleans, hand mixes, hand shapes, and paints her sculptures using all natural colors by herself. Wilma’s storytellers always have really big bright eyes, and she said “I got the idea from my daughter, Megan, when she was born with bright eyes.” Wilma signs her pottery as: Wilma M. Gachupin, Jemez.

Wilma is related to the following artists: Kenneth Sando (brother), Megan Gachupin and Kayla Gachupin (daughters).

Awards:

-1999 New Mexico State Fair 3rd Place

-Eighth Northern Arts & Crafts Show

-Towa Arts & Crafts Show

-New Mexico State Fair

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Storytellers and Other Figurative Pottery

 

Garcia, Elliot and Zelda (Acoma)

Elliott & Zelda Garcia, members of the Sun Clan and Parrot Clan, are full blooded Native American Indians from the Pueblo of Acoma. Elliott was born in 1947 and Zelda was born in 1967. They were inspired to continue the family tradition of pottery crafting by their creativity, and economic motivation.

They specialize in hand crafting ceramic pottery. Each piece of pottery that they craft has special meaning: White pottery represents Mother Earth.and Sunce and sunrise represents clan origin. Bear and bear claw represents power, straight, and long life. Feathers represent spirits up above. Lizards and turtles represent good luck. Pueblos represent Acoma Sky City. The colors they use also represent elements of the earth like: red and yellow represent the sun, blue represents the sky. Black represents the clouds and mountains. The fine lines represent the rain that is one of the oldest designs used. They etch and craft all these symbols on their pottery freehand, no stencils are involved.They sign their pottery as: Zel Sun Rise, followed by a sun symbol to denote their clan origin.

They are related to the following artists: Shana, Lynette, Janet Garcia (daughters), and Wilfred Garcia (brother).

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

 

Garcia, Evangeline and Piaso, Helen (Navajo)

Evangeline Garcia and Helen Piaso are sisters that have teamed up to make authentic Navajo handmade dolls. Evangeline was born in 1959 and Helen was born in 1941. They were born into the Navajo Nation. They were inspired to continue the family tradition, and to learn the art of doll making from their Mother, Hannah Garcia. Evangeline was 14 years old when she began experimenting with cloth dolls. Helen was 20 years old when she decided to make cloth dolls. They were also economically motivated to create a form of art.

They were taught all the fundamentals of sewing. They use cloth, sequins, beads, wool, yarn, and cotton, to stitch together cloth dolls and figurines like: corn grinders, horses, story tellers, and Navajo ladies with babies.

They are related to: Jenny and Johnny Manuelito.

 

Garcia, Gloria "Goldenrod" (Santa Clara)

Gloria “Goldendrod” Garcia is a full blooded Native American Indian. She was born in 1942 into the Santa Clara Pueblo. She was taught all the fundamentals of constructing pottery vessels using the ancient traditional way by members of her Pueblo.

                  Goldenrod specializes in hand coiled and sgrafitto seed jars. She gathers her raw clumps of clay, volcanic ash, and natural vegetation from within the Santa Clara Pueblo. She breaks down the clumps of clay and the volcanic ash into a fine powder form and hand mixes it with water to produce a fine medium, once that has been obtained she begins rolling the clay out into long snake like coils and begins hand building her vessels, once the pottery has taken form it is set out to dry. When the pottery has dried she sands each piece by hand to smooth out any rough edges. She hand polishes and hand etches her designs without any stencils. Her designs range in a wide variety of horses, buffalo, corn maidens, Avanyu (serpent believed to protect Pueblo People), butterflies, rain clouds, deer, bears, bear paws, and redwing blackbirds. Goldenrod completes her masterpieces by offering a traditional outdoor firing. She signs her pottery as: Goldendrod. She is related to: John Garcia (husband), Jason Garcia, John David Garcia, Jr. (sons), and Petra Gutierrez (mother).

Publications:

-Pueblo Indian Pottery 750 Artist Biographies

-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

-Miniatures of the Southwest

-American Indian Art Magazine 1978 & 1978

-Indian Artist Magazine 1990 & 1996

Awards:

-2001 New Mexico State Fair 4th Place

-1998 Santa Fe Indian Market 3rd Place

-1994 Santa Fe Indian Market 1st Place

-1992 Santa Fe Indian Market 2nd Place

-1990 Santa Fe Indian Market 1st Place

-1989 Santa Fe Indian Market 1st Place

-1988 Santa Fe Indian Market 3rd Place

-1986 Santa Fe Indian Market 2nd Place

-1983 Santa Fe Indian Market 1st Place

-1981 Santa Fe Indian Market 2nd Place

-1979 Santa Fe Indian Market 2nd Place

-1978 Santa Fe Indian Market 2nd Place

-1977 Santa Fe Indian Market Best of Division

Check for work by this artist in our Santa Clara Pottery section!

Garcia, Greg (Santa Clara/San Juan)

Greg Garcia was born in 1961. He is a full blooded Native American Indian. He is half San Juan and half Santa Clara. He was inspired to make pottery at the age of 14 by his Grandmother, Severa Tafoya. She taught him all the fundamentals of making traditional pottery. She also encouraged him to continue the long lived family tradition of working with clay.

Greg specializes in the hand coiled traditional black and red Santa Clara pottery. He gathers his clay from the sacred grounds within the Santa Clara Pueblo. He hand cleans the clay, mixes, hand coils, shapes, and fires his pottery the traditional way, outdoors, with horse manure. He also will polish his pottery to add a great shine on his masterpieces. Greg signs his pottery as: Greg Garcia, San Juan/Santa Clara.

Greg is related to the following artists: Tina Garcia (sister) and Angela Baca (aunt).

Awards:

-1998 Gallup Intertribal Arts & Crafts Show

  1st, 2nd, and 3rd place

-1994 Gallup Inter-Tribal Arts & Crafts Show

  Best in show

Publications:

-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

-Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery

-Miniature Arts of the Southwest

-Pueblo Indian Pottery 750 Artist Biographies

 

Garcia, Loretta (Acoma)

Loretta Garcia, “U-Wi-Nit”, was born into the Acoma Pueblo in 1956. She was inspired and encouraged to learn the art ofpottery making by her Mother, Marie Torivio. Marie taught Loretta all the fundamentals of pottery making, the traditional way, from start to finish. She was also economically motivated to make her pottery.

Loretta specializes in hand coiled traditional pottery. She gathers her clay from a sacred ground within the Acoma Pueblo. Loretta soaks the clay, cleans, sifts, mixes, hand coils,shapes, paints, and fires her pottery, the traditional way, outdoors, with pottery shards and manure. She hand coils many  different shapes and sizes of pottery. She paints geometrical and traditional designs on her pottery. Loretta also paints on ceramic pottery. Loretta says, “I am proud to be able to continue the tradition, that my ancestors began many years ago. It brings peace to my mind  knowing that I am contributing to their legacy.” Loretta signs her pottery as: L. Garcia, Acoma.

Loretta is related to the following artists: Nelda Lucero (sister) and Leslie Garcia (daughter).

Awards:

-New Mexico State Fair 2nd place

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

 

Garcia, Marcus and Virginia (Acoma)

Marcus “Red Corn Child” and Virginia Garcia are both full blooded Native American Indians that were born into the Acoma Pueblo. Marcus was born in 1937 and they are both members of the Sun Clan. Marcus was inspired to continue the family tradition of hand coiling pottery from his late Mother, Jessie Garcia. As a young child, Jessie taught Marcus all the fundamentals of pottery making the traditional way. He has seriously been making pottery since he was 17 years of age. The lucrative aspect of the business also played a roll in their interest in pottery making.

Marcus and Virginia specialize in re-creating early or pre historical pottery and bowls. They both contribute equally to their hard work. All of their pottery is made by the traditional hand coiling method. He extracts his colors from minerals and natural plant life surrounding the Acoma Pueblo. Marcus and Virginia are known for their hand painted lizard patterns on pre-historic pottery.

They sign their pottery as: V. Garcia , Acoma, NM.

They are related to Tina Garcia (sister) who is also a practicing artist.

 

Awards:

-1989 New Mexico State Fair 1st & 2nd Place

-1992 Jemez Pueblo Arts & Crafts Show 1st Place

-1995 Gallup Inter-Tribal Ceremonial 2nd Place

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

 

Garcia, Sally (Laguna)

Sally R. Garcia, “Gah-Wee-Nah-Zah” (running brook), is a full blooded Native American Indian. She was born in 1940 into the Laguna Pueblo. Sally was inspired to continue a long lived tradition of working with pottery from within her heart. She strongly believes in keeping tradition alive and prosperous. She began carving on pottery at the age of 19 in 1959.

Sally is credited as the first pioneer for hand etchings on ceramic pottery.

Sally specializes in hand etching animals, Mudheads (clowns), flowers, and mimbres designs on ceramic pottery. Much of Sally’s etchings are stories of nature, which she is very proud and inspired by. She etches her designs with a simple tool, like a carving blade. Sally uses no stencils or other means to etch her intricate etchings. She currently is concentrating on etching ceramic horse hair pottery. Her etchings add a unique flare and compliment the horse hair pottery quite nicely. Sally has definitely proven herself as a true artisan with her intricate etch work. She signs her art work as: SGarcia, Laguna, N.M. or as: Sally R. Garcia, Laguna, N.M.

Sally is related to: Paul Lucario, Jr. (brother), Arthur Lucario (brother), Darren Pasquale (Nephew), Santana Antonio (grandmother), and Mildred Antonio (aunt).

Awards:

-1979 New Mexico State Fair 1st Place

-1980 New Mexico State Fair 1st Place

-1981 New Mexico State Fair 1st Place

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000

  Artist Biographies

-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

 

Garcia, Tina (Santa Clara/San Juan)

Tina Garcia is a full blooded Native American Indian born in 1957 into the Santa Clara Pueblo. Pueblo children are seldom taught to make pottery. They learn by watching and experimenting with clay on their own. She was inspired to learn the art of pottery making from Lydia Garcia (mother), Angela Baca (aunt), and Severa Tafoya (grandmother). As a young child, Tina observed them with a careful eye in hopes that someday she to would be able to add to the legacy of an artisan. Tina displayed a strong interest in continuing the family tradition of pottery making, at the age of 11. Her mother began to share traditional pottery making knowledge with her. Tina began hand coiling pottery for a living in 1980. She enrolled in the School of American Research to study older traditional pottery.

Tina specializes in handmade traditional Santa Clara pottery (black or red). All of her materials are provided for her from elements of the earth. She gathers her own clay, cleans, mixes, shapes, coils, and fires her pottery the traditional way, outdoors. Her pottery shows remarkable gift for form, and her polish is of superior quality. Today, Tina continues to produce only the finest quality of pottery, and her capability of making large pieces are a success. They range from 20” to 25” in height and diameter. Tina has worked with many prestigious pottery demonstrations and has assisted in producing a video along with Bruce Hucko for the Wheel Wright Museum in Santa Fe, N.M. about traditional pottery in our current era.

Tina has won awards too numerous to list and she is referenced in several publications. Her pottery is definitely an art to behold for generations to come.

 

Publications:

-Southwestern Pottery                          

  Anasazi to Zuni

-Pueblo Indian Pottery 750

  Artist Biographies

 

Garcia, Wilfred Jr. (Acoma)

Wilfred Garcia, Jr., is a full blooded Native American Indian. He was born in 1954 into the Acoma Pueblo. He was inspired to learn the art of working with clay from his mother-in-law, the late Stella Shutiva. She taught him all the fundamentals of working with clay and using the ancient traditional methods that have been passed down from generation to generation. Wilfred was very artistically inclined as a young boy and thus sparked his interest in pursuing a career as a pottery artisan.

Wilfred has established himself as a fine contemporary pottery artisan. He gathers clumps of  natural clays from within the Acoma Pueblo. He breaks down the clumps into a fine powder form which he  hand mixes with sand and water to temper the clay. Then, he rolls his moist clay into snake like coils and begins building his pottery into the desired shape. He creates many shapes of pottery vessels such as: seedpots, vases, and Mesa Verde motif vases with ladders. Once his vessels are built he sets them out to dry. Once his formed pottery vessels are dry he sands them down for a smooth finish. Finally, Wilfred fires his pottery in a kiln. He signs his pottery as: WGarcia, Acoma. Wilfred states: “Making pottery for over 12 years has given me joy and love for my art. I take my time with every piece that I construct so that each piece is special”. He is related to: Jackie Histia-Shutiva (sister-in-law) and Sandra Garcia (spouse).

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Beyond Tradition

-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

-American Indian Art

Awards:

-Santa Fe Indian Market Best In Show

-Santa Fe Indian Market 1st, 2nd, & 3rd Place

-Santa Fe Indian Market Honorable Mention

Check for work by this artist in our Acoma Pottery section!

Garcia-Rustin, Shawna (Acoma)

Shawna Garcia-Rustin is a full blooded Native American Indian.  She was born in December of 1969 into the Acoma Pueblo, and is a member of the Red Corn Clan family.  She learned the ancient art of working with clay from her parents in 1991. They taught her all the fundamentals of continuing the long lived ancient tradition of pottery making, using the hand coiling methods her ancestors used before her.  She currently collaborates with Patrick Rustin, who was born into the Apache Tribe from California in 1970, and together this team makes the finest contemporary pottery created today.

Shawna and Patrick specialize together as a  team to create the thinnest of all hand coiled abstract pottery vessels.  They gather their raw clumps of clay and all natural vegetation needed for constructing their art from within the Acoma Pueblo.  They break the clumps of clay into a fine powder form and mix it with water and other natural pigments.  Once the clay is mixed, they begin rolling it out into snake like coils and they begin building the vessels.  Once the vessels are created they are set out to dry, and when they are dried they are hand sanded and, finally hand painted with all natural slips applied with an authentic yucca stem that was fashioned into a brush. They are related to Elliott & Beatrice Garcia (parents).  They sign the pottery as S. Garcia, Acoma N.M. or Garcia-Rustin.

Awards:

-1997 New Mexico State Fair 3rd Place

-1998 New Mexico State Fair Best of Show

-2000 New Mexico State Fair Best of Show

-2000 New Mexico State Fair 1st Place

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

 

Gonzales, John (San Ildefonso)

John F. Gonzales is a full blooded Native American Tewa Indian from the San Ildefonso Pueblo. After a distinguished academic career at Stanford University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Gonzales worked in a series of administrative and management positions. In 1987 he was elected by Tribes throughout the United States as President of the National Congress of American Indians. He was the youngest person ever elected to that position with the Bush Administration as a Consultant working with Secretary of the Interior Manuel Lujan in establishing the National Indian Gaming Commission. Early in 1991, Gonzales decided that he needed to return home to New Mexico and to reinvolve himself in Pueblo life. Little did he know this would lead to a career change.

With the encouragement of his father, Lorenzo, a well-established potter, Gonzales immersed himself into the ancient tradition of working with clay. He attributes the ease of his transition from a life in politics to a career in art to the assistance of his father and sister. They made clay, slips, and polishing stones available, but, more importantly, they shared their expertise. It didn’t take long for Gonzales to realize that he had a gift for working with clay. his doubts about whether or not he could make a living from his art work soon vanished.

In 1994 John Gonzales won the prestigious Southwest Association for Indian Art (SWAIA).Quail Run Fellowship. Events in 1995 led him to become more involved with the SWAIA Organization, the sponsor of the world class showcase of Indian Art-the Santa Fe Indian Market. He served on Board of Directors and served as Chairman in 1997. In October, 1998 he was honored with being inducted into the Stanford University American Indian Alumni Hall of Fame.

Gonzales has exhibited at the Santa Fe Indian Market, Eight Northern Indian Pueblos, Council Arts and Crafts Show, Eiteljorg Museum Indian Art Market in Indianapolis, Southwest Museum Indian Art show in Los Angeles, and the Heard Museum Guild Indian Fair in Phoenix. His pottery was selected for the opening exhibit at the Iris & B. Gerald Cantor Center for Visual Arts at Stanford University in January, 1999. His is especially grateful that he chose to come home when he did, since he lost his father in 1995, his mother and older brother in 1996.

 

The change in careers allowed him to spend precious time with his parents.  “The natural clays I gather from Mother Earth sustains me and provides me with a spiritual sense of well-being,” he asserts. He firmly believes he was touched by the Creator and blessed with his artistic talent late in his life so that he could work side by side with his father and at the same time take care of his diabetic mother. “Their spirit moves through me and lies within each piece of pottery I create,” Gonzales concludes. His artistic career is dedicated to their memory.

 

Gurley, Rita (Navajo)

Rita Gurley is a full blooded Native American Indian. She was born into the Navajo Nation in 1950. She grew up in Houck, A.Z. in the reservation. At the age of 21 she married Joseph Gurley and decided to move away and begin her new life. She was taught to make artifacts from several different members of her family.The lucrative aspect of the business also was a key role in her inspiration to learn to craft art. She has been making artifacts since 1989.

Rita specializes in hand making contemporary replications of ancient artifacts that were useful tools and were essential to the lifestlye of her ancestors, which consist of bow & arrows, ceremonial rattles, tomahawks, spears, and pipes. Rita uses many different materials on her art like: leather, rawhide, wooden beads, turkey feathers, antler bones, authentic horse hair, metal, and seed beads. With all these raw materials, Rita uses her artistic imagination and makes some of the most interesting traditional artifacts from an unforgotten legacy. Rita really enjoys her God given talent. She says it soothes her mind and takes her back to a time when life was much more simple.

Rita is related to Vernie Nez who also constructs artifacts and weaves navajo rugs.

 

Awards:

-1998 New Mexico State Fair 1st place

-1997 New Mexico State Fair 1st place

 

Gutierrez, Gary (Santa Clara-Tewa)

Gary Gutierrez, “P’aa-Ay-P’in”, or “Deer Mountain”,was born in 1967 to the Santa Clara Pueblo-Tewa. He began working with clay at the age of  9. Through out this time he also began to sell his art successfully. Gary was inspired to make pottery by the Anasazi people.

Gary specializes in hand making what he calls Anasazi figurines. He said, “To me they represent a time, when life was simple and balanced in this world.” Gary’s favorite one’s to mold are the figures that hold the pottery. Gary signs his pottery as: Gary Gutierrez, Santa Clara, followed by the month and year they were sculpted.

Gary is related to the following artists: Paul Gutierrez, Dorothy Gutierrez (parents), Luther Gutierrez (grandfather), Margaret Gutierrez (aunt), Lela Gutierrez, and Van Gutierrez (great grandparents).

Awards:

-1999 New Mexico State Fair 2nd Place

-1999 Santa Fe Indian Market (2) 1st Place

-Santa Fe Indian Market (1st numerous times)

-New Mexico State Fair (1st numerous times)

-Gallup Inter Tribal Ceremony (1st 1993-1995)

-Bank of Santa Fe 1985 artist under 18 yrs.

Publications:

-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

-Collections of Southwest Pottery

-Storytellers and Other Figurative Pottery

-Pueblo Indian Pottery 750 Artist Biographies

Check for work by this artist in our Santa Clara Pottery section!

Gutierrez, Julie (Santa Clara)

Julie was born in 1965 and has been potting since 1977. She learned to work the clay from her mother, Victoria Gutierrez, and also counts two sisters, Effie Garcia and Sally M. Gutierrez, as inspiration. Julie often makes animals and a mushroom shape of her own creation, in addition to more traditional pottery shapes. Her trademark design is a swirling sgraffito pattern that mimics flowers or a spider's web in both red- and blackware. On occasion, Julie likes to work with her husband, Johnny Tapia, also of Santa Clara.

Check for work by this artist in our Santa Clara Pottery section!

Gutierrez, Margaret (Santa Clara)

This fine lady was one-half of the famous potting duo of Margaret and Luther. Margaret and Luther were siblings -- the children of another well known potting combination -- Lela and Van. Lela and Van created a very distinctive style based on multiple colored slips and paints and this style was continued and modified somewhat by Margaret and Luther. Upon Luther's death in 1989, Margaret continued to work with the assistance of Luther's daughter Pauline, but Pauline died shortly thereafter. Since that time, Margaret has continued the tradition alone creating fine figurines and pots in a most unique style. More information may be found in the Dillingham book "Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery" page 176.

Check for work by this artist in our Santa Clara Pottery section!

Gutierrez, Paul & Dorothy (Santa Clara)

Paul and Dorothy Gutierrez have been married since 1965, and have two sons, Paul Gutierrez Jr. and Gary Gutierrez. Dorothy was born in 1940 and is a Navajo woman. Her mother is a weaver who weaves belts. Paul Sr. was born is 1936 and is a Tewa Pueblo Indian. They are very well known for their Black Mudhead Figurines. The mudheads are now what we call "Koshares" and they take part in the Indian ceremonial dances as clowns. They are made to put a smile on your face and to remind you not to take life so seriously all of the time. Paul's parents were both well know potters by the names of Lela and Vann Gutierrez. Paul has two sisters. Margaret Gutierrez, in her late fifties, to out knowledge still makes pottery. She specializes in polychrome bowls and figurines. Paul's late sister, Pauline Gutierrez, taught him the art of pottery making. Paul's niece, Stephanie Naranjo, also makes polychrome figurines. The Gutierrez family biography can be found in many books including "The fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery," by Rick Dillingham.

Check for work by this artist in our Santa Clara Pottery section!

Guiterrez-Yazza, Ethel (Santa Clara-Tewa)

Ethel “Turquoise Rock” Gutierrez-Yazza is a full blooded Native American Indian. She was born in 1959 into the Santa Clara-Tewa Pueblo. Ethel began working with clay at the age of 5. She was taught all the fundamentals of hand coiling traditional black pottery and using the ancient traditional methods in the process, which were past down from generation to generation. The lucrative aspect of the business also inspired her to become an artisan.

Ethel specializes in stone polished black Santa Clara pottery. She gathers her clumps of clay from within the Santa Clara Pueblo. Then, Ethel soaks the clay to break it down. She mixes the clay with volcanic ash along with other natural elements. She begins the hand coiling methods and hand shapes her pottery. After the pottery is formed she begins carving her pottery with meaningful designs known to her people. Her carvings include serpents, kiva steps, feathers, and water waves which all symbolize important religious beliefs to her people. She signs her pottery as: Ethel Yazza, Santa Clara Pueblo, New Mexico. Effie Garcia, Julie Gutierrez, Sally Gutierrez-Tafoya (sisters), and Eugene Gutierrez (brother) are among a few of her relatives continuing the long lived tradition of hand coiling pottery.

Awards:

-Eighth Northern Arts & Crafts Show 2nd Place

Publications:

-Focus Magazine

-Cowboys & Indians Magazine

 

Harris, Clyde (Hopi)

Clyde Harris, “Lomatuhksi”, Eagle Down, was born into the Hopi Nation back in 1982, member of the Flute Deer clan. He was inspired to carve on wood by his Father, Gene Dawahoya. He would sit and watch his father carve his sculptures with great enthusiasm and admiration in hopes of achieving the same skills. It appears from what he has sculpted, he is well on his way to achieve his goal.

Clyde began carving on wood at the age of 12, in 1994. He takes strolls along the Rio Grande River in search of decent sizes of cotton wood tree roots to carve on. He carves his sculptures with a regular pocket knife. Clyde uses acrylic paints to color his kachinas.

The first piece he carved was a rattle kachina.

Clyde signs his sculptures as: Clyde Harris, Hopi, name of the Kachina, and followed by a set of hoof prints to denote his clan origin.

Clyde is related to the following artists: Gene Dawahoya (father), Nuvadi Dawahoya (uncle), Delwin Harvey (uncle), and Juanita Healing (grandmother), famous potter.

 

Harris, Robert Jr. (Hopi)

Robert Harris, Jr. was born into the Hopi Reservation on January 4, 1984. He is a  member of the Flute Deer clan. He was inspired to carve on wood by his Father, Robert Harris, Sr. He would sit and watch his father carve his sculptures with great enthusiasm and admiration in hopes of achieving the same skills. It appears from what he has sculpted, he is well on his way to achieve his goal.

Robert began carving on wood at the age of 11, in 1995. He takes strolls along the Rio Grande River in search of decent sizes of cotton wood tree roots to carve on. He carves his sculptures with a regular pocket knife. Robert hand paints his kachinas with acrylic paints. His favorite kachina to carve is the Whipper Kachina. Robert signs his sculptures as: Robert Harris, Jr., Hopi, and followed by a set of hoof prints to denote his clan origin.

Robert is related to the following artists: Robert Harris, Sr. (father), Clyde Harris (brother), Nuvadi Dawahoya (uncle), Delwin Harvey (uncle), and Juanita Healing (grandmother), famous potter.

 

Harrison, Jim (Navajo)

Jimmy Harrison is an authentic Native American Indian.  He is a member of the Red House Clan.  He was born into the Navajo Reservation in 1952.  Jim began his professional career as a jewelry craftsman in 1981.  He was taught all the fundamentals of working with silver at the age of 16 when he enrolled in a silversmithing class in high school.  He credits Preston Monongya and Jessie Monongya for his success as a fine jewelry artisan.  They shared their techniques with him and opened up his mind to his own designs.  His designs are reflective of the bright stars of the New Mexico nights and the geometric forms of the landscape.  They all play a part in his finely detailed inlay jewelry.  With sleek and contemporary shapes and designs, he manages to balance the flavor of tradition with his stylized approach to Indian imagery.  It is believed that Preston, Jesse, and Jim were among the first jewelers to work extensively with inlay of multicolored stones and shells with silver.  His designs continue to change and they include Hopi and Navajo Sunfaces, and the Yei- bei-chei.  He experiments with landscapes and  galaxies.  On occasion, Jim adds a rug design as a border to his beautiful designs.  The work of Jimmy Harrison is very distinctive and easily recognizable.  He works primarily with sterling silver and  authentic multi-colored inlayed stones such as, coral, turquoise, lapis, sugalite, mother of pearl stones, and other various materials.  His colorful and innovative inlays in his jewelry are inspired by the natural gifts that Mother Earth and Father Sky provide to each and every one of us.   His creations include rings, necklaces, bolos, bracelets, earrings, and concho belts.  He stamps his jewelry as, Jimmy Harrison.

Awards:

-Northern Arizona Museum Best of Show

-Navajo Nation Fair Best of Show

-Eight Northern Pueblo Art Show Best of Show

-1988 Best of Show Santa Fe Indian Market

-Others too numerous to list

Publications:

-American Indian Jewelry I 1,200 Artist Biographies

 

Harvey, Delwyn (Hopi)

Delwyn Harvey, “Wea” (One of a kind), was born into the Hopi-Tewa Reservation in 1965. He is a member of the Kachina Crow Clan. Delwyn has been carving Hopi kachinas since 1978. He is a self taught artist. The lucrative aspect of the business is what has inspired Delwyn to continue his family tradition of carving dolls on wood.

Delwyn hand carves cottonwood root into magnificent full bodied kachina dolls with a simple tool like a pocket knife. His carvings are carved with extreme precision and detail. He applies acrylic paints to his dolls and paints them very carefully because it is essential for the Hopi People to represent the kachina as accuratly as possible. Many of his dolls are carved from one continuous piece of cottonwood. Some of his dolls are sought by collector’s all over the world. Delwyn signs his dolls as: D. Harvey.

There are over 300 known kachinas from the Hopi Reservation alone. Kachinas are believed to be the spiritual guardians of the Indian way of life. The good that comes from a careful study of kachina carvings is the express intent of being in harmony with nature and the fine art of offering spiritual graditude.

Delwyn is related to the following artists: Nuvadi Dawahoya (brother-in-law) and Gene Dawahoya (brother-in-law).

Awards:

-New Mexico State Fair 2nd Place 1999

-New Mexico State Fair 1st Place 2000

 

Haya, Golie (Acoma)

Goldie A. Hayah was given the Indian name of “Shro Te Ma”. She is a  member of the Turkey Clan, and she is a full blooded Native American Indian. She was born in 1956 into the Acoma Pueblo. She was inspired to learn the art of working with clay,  by observing  her mother and other members of her Pueblo hand coil their pottery. She has been hand coiling pottery for over 35 years now.

Goldie specializes in handmade and ceramic pottery with hand painted animals and flower designs. She gathers her clay from within the hills of  the Acoma Pueblo. She breaks the clumps of raw clay to a powder form. Then, she cleans and sifts the powder for impurities, hand mixes with other natural pigments, hand shapes, allows the pottery to dry, hand sands with sand paper, and hand paints her designs. Finally, she fires her pottery the traditional way, outdoors with wood chips. Among her favorite designs to paint, she enjoys hand painting parrots, bears, and antelopes. She signs her pottery as: Goldie Haya, Acoma, N.M. She is related to: Jackie Histia (cousin), Darren Pasquale (cousin), and Tina Garcia (aunt).

Awards:

-1998 New Mexico State Fair 1st Place

 

Henderson, Christine "Aggie" (Acoma)

Christine, “Aggie”, Henderson-Poncho was born in 1973. She is a full blooded Native American Indian. Aggie was raised in the Acoma Pueblo, but is half Apache and half Pima. Aggie began experimenting with pottery in 1985 at the age of 15. She was inspired by her Mother-in-law, Marilyn Ray-Henderson, who is one of the finest clay sculpture artists hand making storytellers today .

Aggie specializes in hand making traditional storytellers with natural paints and clays. She also makes a wide variety of various clay sculptures and will on occasion paint on ceramic pottery. Marilyn Ray-Henderson taught Aggie all the fundamentals of pottery making, like: where to dig up the clay and how to clean, mix, shape, paint, and fire her pottery sculptures using ancient methods. Aggie has perfected her pottery making skills through the years. Aggie signs her pottery as: “Aggie”, Acoma NM, followed by the year the pottery was made.

Aggie is related to the following artists: Crystal Poncho, Tina Poncho (sisters), Chris S. Martinez (mother), and Yolanda Paytiamo (aunt).

Awards:

-Gallup Inter-Tribal Ceremonial 2nd place

-New Mexico State Fair

 

Henderson, Helen (Jemez)

Helen Henderson is a full blooded Native American Indian, she was born in the small but active village of Jemez (Walatowa) located about 55 miles from Albuquerque, N.M. She is a member of the Eagle Clan.  Helen comes from a long line of potters, originating with her Great Grandmother, Maria Sanchez Colaque, she is also distantly related to Maria Martinez, the extremely famous potter known for her black on black pottery. She mastered the art of hand coiling pottery by watching and assisting her family members.  Helen has been working continuously with clay art forms since 1987.

Helen has chosen to follow the foot steps of her mother, Vangie Tafoya who has developed her own unique style of flawless freehand designs of exquisite hummingbirds, water serpents, flowers, and feathers and accents them with authentic turquoise stones. Her pottery grabs the attention of viewers, allowing them to experience her living art and unique designs. Helen uses all natural materials and paints which she harvests from within the Jemez Pueblo. Helen signs her pottery as: Helen Henderson, Jemez, followed by a eagle feather as her own singular trademark, to denote her clan origin.

Helen is also related to the following artists: Brenda Tafoya (sister), Maria Sanchez Colaque (great grandmother).

Awards:

-1988 Santa Fe Indian Market 3rd Place

-1998 Santa Fe Indian Market 3rd Place

-New Mexico State Fair Various Years

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Native Peoples Magazine 1997 Edition

-Indian Market Magazine 1998 & 1999

 

Herrera, Edwin (Cochiti)

Edwin Herrera “Ie-yoo-ris” is a full blooded Native American Indian. He is a member of the Oak Clan. Edwin was born in 1966 into the Cochiti Pueblo. He was inspired to learn the art of working with clay from his mother, Mary Frances Herrera. She taught him all the fundamentals of working with clay, using the ancient traditional methods passed on to her from their ancestors during the process. He began experimenting with clay in the early 1980’s while attending High School. This was his means of making money so that he could attend school dances, games, and other school functions. He is currently one of the few pottery artists that currently continue the long lived family tradition of working with clay pottery. He admired the artistic style of other artisans and motivated himself to create his own unique style of art.

Edwin gathers his clay and sand from within the hills of the Cochiti Pueblo. He hand mixes, hand coils, shapes, hand paints, and fires his pottery the traditional way, outdoors, using cedar wood chips. Edwin specializes in hand sculpted wildlife and southwestern nativity’s, bear sculptures, and hand coiled traditional pottery bowls. He boils his own natural minerals and vegetables to produce his colors used on his art. The designs which are painted on his pottery are from ancient Cochiti Pueblo designs. He signs his art as: Edwin Herrera, Cochiti, N.M. He is related to Dorothy Herrera and Mary R. Herrera (sisters).

Awards:

-None to date

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Storytellers and Other Figurative Pottery

-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

 

Herrera, Irene (Zia/Jemez)

Irene Herrera, “Apple Flower” was born in 1942. She is half Zia and half Jemez. Irene was inspired to hand coil pottery using ancient traditional methods passed down to her by her mother, Andrea Tsosie. Irene was 8 years old when she sparked an interest in pottery making. She would sit and observe Andrea hand coil and paint her pottery, and at the age of 12 she started to paint on pottery. The lucrative aspect of the business was also inspiration for her to learn the art of pottery making. However, it is more of a hobby for Irene to contribute to the art world.

Irene specializes in the traditional Zia Pueblo hand coiled and hand painted pottery. She gathers her clay within the Zia Pueblo. Then, she grinds, hand cleans the clay, mixes, hand coils, shapes, paints and fires her pottery the traditional way, outdoors. Irene hand coils a wide variety of shapes and sizes. The colors she uses on her pottery are also natural pigments. She said “I enjoy making pottery because it comes from within my heart and it’s a gift to make my pottery.” Irene signs her pottery as: Irene Herrera, Zia.

Irene is also related to the following artists: Leonard Tsosie, Rebecca Tsosie-Gachupin, and Joanne Tsosie-Toribio.

Awards:

-Eighth Northern Art Show Best of Show

-Eighth Northern Art Show 2nd place

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

 

Histia-Shutiva, Jackie (Acoma)

Jackie Histia-Shutiva is a full blooded Native American Indian. She was born in 1961 into the Acoma Pueblo. She is a member of the Sun Clan and the Yellow Corn Child Clan. Jackie was taught the traditional methods used by her ancestors from her mother, Stella Shutiva at the age of 19. Stella shared all the fundamentals of working with clay and using ancient hand coiling methods.

Jackie specializes in hand coiled, traditional, contemporary, corrugated pottery. She gathers her clumps of raw clay from within the Acoma Pueblo. Then she breaks down the clumps into a fine powder form and mixes with sand to temper the clay. Once the clay has been properly cleaned and mixed Jackie begins the hand coiling process by rolling the clay into snake like coils and building a vessel to a desired shape and size. Then, she hand pinches her thumbnails into the clay to give it that corrugated  look. Finally, she fires her pottery the traditional way, outdoors. On occasion Jackie also hand crafts clay corn symbols in her clay to denote her Clan origin. Jackie hand coils a wide variety of shapes and sizes of pottery. She signs her pottery as: Histia Shutiva, Acoma, NM. She is related to: Ernest D. Shutiva (father), Stella Shutiva (mother), B. Gregory Histia (spouse), Shelly Shutiva, Alicia Shutiva, and Lindsey Shutiva (daughters).

Awards:

-New Mexico State Fair

-Eight Northern Arts and Crafts Show

-Southwest Indian Arts Show

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Talking With The Clay

-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

 

Homer, Marcus (Zuni)

Marcus Homer was born in 1971 into the Zuni Pueblo. He was inspired to continue the family tradition of pottery making from his ancestors. He began experimenting with pottery making at the age of 7, back in 1978.

Marcus specializes in a unique style of hand coiled cornmeal bowls and fetish bowls. Corn meal vessels are used for religious ceremonies, whereas fetish bowls are used for healing powers and good fortune from the four directions of Mother Earth. He also makes a wide variety of shapes and sizes of other contemporary and traditional styled pottery, even though he is most known for his unique contemporary fetish bowls accented with lizards, frogs, serpents, and tadpoles. He enjoys making them the most because he can express himself in so many different ways. All of Homer’s pottery is made from Mother Earth, the traditional way. Homer signs his pottery as: M. Homer, year pottery was made, followed by a bear paw, and Zuni.

Awards:

-New Mexico State Fair

-Northern Arizona Museum Art Show

-Gallup Intertribal Ceremonial Art Show

-Heard Museum of Phoenix

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Treasures of the Zuni

 

Jim, Cheyenne (Navajo)

Cheyenne (Diane Lynn) Jim is a full blooded Native American Indian born in 1957 into the Navajo Nation. Cheyenne was raised with a rich Navajo cultural tradition. At the age of six, she accompanied her grandmother, who is a “medicine woman”, to a Ye’II bi Cheii ceremony (a nine night winter ceremony of the Navajo People, where dozens of deities are presented each night wearing masks). This made a great impact on the young Cheyenne.

Despite Cheyenne’s cultural influence, her sculptures do not reflect Navajo or Indian traditions. For instance, her recent masks and clay sculptures possess partial cubism (Pablo Picasso), another strong influence from her college years at Bacone, where she studied art. Cheyenne attended College at Bacone College in Muskogee, OK. Cubism absolutely fascinated her. For years it stayed in her mind, but she wasn’t confident enough to incorporate it into her work until recently. She is a self-taught artisan from observation. Her schooling did not alter her initial influence from her grandmother (Aasdzaan Doo’al hoshii), whose knowledge on Navajo healing ceremonies and herbology gave her prominent status among her people. She tried not to be analytical on pottery, but that’s what it boiled down to. Eventually, Cheyenne took what she thought were the best techniques to construct her masterpieces, but finding the right clay to work with was tough, that’s where she ran into a lot of difficulty. Although, she works predominately with mica clay, her subjects and themes are varied. Cheyenne’s unique style of art is far from traditional. She is not, nor does she want to be limited by tradition. She was quoted as saying: “A true artist has no tradition to follow, only the freedom to create and be innovative.” All of Cheyenne’s art is handmade and hand painted from start to finish. She signs her art as: Cheyenne Jim.

Publications:

-Storytellers & Other Figurative Pottery

Awards:

-1999 New Mexico State Fair 1st Place

-Too many to list

 

Juanico, Andy (Acoma)

Andy Juanico is a full blooded Native American Indian. Hewas born into the Pueblo of the Acoma in 1954. He has been making art since he was 30 years old. He inspired himself to make his art. The lucrative aspect of the business also encouraged him to be creative with his work.

Andy specializes in making artifacts. He uses gem beads, raw hide, artificial senu, leather straps, duck feathers, horse hair, his creative imagination and the results are very rewarding to him. He turns all of those materials into different artifacts like: dream catchers, spears, dance sticks, cou sticks, and anything his mind can possibly imagine.

Andy attaches his own certificate of authenticity with every piece of art that he creates. It lists his name Andy Juanico, census number and tribe affiliation.

Andy is related to the following artists: Marcus Garcia (brother), and Virginia Garcia (sister-in-law), both make pottery.

Awards:

-None to date

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies 

 

Kahe, Gloria (Navajo/Hopi)

Gloria Kahe is a full blooded Native American Indian, born into the Navajo Nation and is a member of the Water Clan. She was born in 1951. Gloria married into a family of fine Hopi potters. She acquired her pottery making techniques from one of the most respected masters of clay, from the Hopi Reservation, Marcella Kahe (mother-in-law). Marcella taught Gloria all the traditional techniques of hand coiling and hand painting the traditional designs of the Hopi people. She has been making pottery since 1986. The lucrative aspect of the business also played a key roll in her interest as an artist.

Gloria specializes in traditional hand coiled and hand painted pottery. She has developed her own designs on pottery, so that she can establish a style all her own. All of her materials are dug up within in the Hopi Reservation which surround her home. Native minerals and vegetables are also used for contributing the shades on her pottery. Firing is done outdoors, and sheep dung is used for this process. She hand coils symmetrical shapes and sizes. Gloria has established a reputation as a quality artist and has created a market for her fine collectibles. Gloria signs her pottery as: G. Kahe.

Gloria is related to the following artists: Samuel Kahe (husband) and Valerie Kahe (daughter).

 Awards:

-1996 Santa Fe Indian Market 1st Place

-1997 Southwest American Indian Arts 1st Place

-Others numerous to list

Publications:

-Hopi-Tewa Pottery 500 Artist Biographies 

 

Kelsey, Alicia (Acoma)

Alicia Kelsey was born in 1979 into the Acoma Pueblo. She was introduced into pottery making by her Mother, Darla Davis. Darla began involving Alicia with the clay making process at the age of 11.

              Alicia specializes in the handmade traditional styled Acoma pottery with parrots and elements of the earth. Alicia was taught where to get clay from the sacred Pueblo grounds and learned how to clean and grind it to a fine powder. Then she will mix it with pottery shards from other broken pottery in order to recycle the old pottery and reuse it so that nothing goes to waste. She paints with all natural colors. The parrot represents wealth. The rainbow represents the earth and rain. The fine lines represent lightning. The pots were used to carry water on the top of their heads if they were rounded on the bottom. The flat shaped ones were used for storage. She also can paint fine line pottery. Her favorite one to paint is the fine line with the deer pattern. Alicia signs her pottery as: Alicia Kelsey, Acoma, NM.

Alicia is also related to Rachel James (grandmother).

Awards:

-1996 New Mexico State Fair 1st place

-1996 New Mexico State Fair 2nd place

-Window Rock State 2nd place

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies 

 

Komalestewa, Alton (Hopi)

Alton Komalestewa is Hopi -- related through his father to Nampeyo. He, however, never learned to pot while growing up at Hopi Pueblo. As an adult he married Jeannie Shupla, the daughter of esteemed Santa Clara potter, Helen Shupla and the couple moved to Santa Clara Pueblo. There he was taught to pot by Helen and learned to make her famous style of melon pots. Several years later, both Jeannie and Helen passed away, and Alton moved back to Hopi. There he continued to produce pottery in the Helen Shupla style, only with Hopi clay. Recently (2001) he has returned to the Santa Clara Pueblo area and is again potting with local clays and slips. His magnificent pots are the only heirs to melon pots made famous by Helen Shupla and are among the finest pots being made today.

 

Kowemy, Wendell (Laguna)

Wendell Kowemy is a full blooded Native American Indian. He was born into the Laguna Pueblo in 1972. He is a member of the Roadrunner Clan. He was taught all the fundamentals of hand coiling pottery using the ancient traditional methods of his ancestors, under the instruction of Evelyn Cheromiah in 1992. He continues the artform of working with fine pottery to add to the legacy of his people.

Wendell specializes in all natural and traditional hand coiled pottery vessels. He gathers his raw clumps of clay from within the sacred grounds of the Laguna Pueblo. He grinds his clumps of clay into sand like grains and hand mixes sand and water to temper the clay. He begins the hand coiling process which involves rolling out the moist clay into snake like coils and hand building his vessels. Once the vessel has taken form he sets his pottery to dry. Wendell hand boils all of his colors from natural pigments and vegetation which is also harvested from within the Laguna Pueblo. Once the vessels are dry and his colors are boiled Wendell begins hand painting a wide variety of designs which include tularosa swirls, checkerboards, finelines. The designs he paints are usually designs which were found on old potter sherds left from hundreds of years ago. Finally, he fires his pottery the traditional way, outdoors. He signs his pottery as: Wendell Kowemy, New Laguna. He is related to: Kent Kowemy (father), Wendy Cheromiah (mother), Marisa Kowemy, and Aerial (sisters).

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies 

 

Lewis, Carmel (Acoma)

Carmel Lewis was born in 1947 into the Acoma Sky City Pueblo. She is one of the daughters of the world renowned late, Lucy M. Lewis. Lucy was Carmel's biggest inspiration for learning the ancient traditional methods of working with natural handmade pottery. Carmel gathers her clay from the pits within the Acoma Pueblo.  She cleans her clay by hand to purify the natural ingredients that mother earth has provided her with. She hand mixes, hand coils, and hand paints her pottery using the ancient traditional outdoor firing techniques. Her unique hand painted designs  are replicated from tradition symbols found on ancient pottery shards. Lucy was the driving force behind the revival of pottery making as an art in the pueblo of Acoma. The Lewis family keeps the same patterns and does not move to a contemporary style because it is very important to them to keep alive true traditions and designs of the ancient mimbres people alive. Some  of the of these designs which are replicated are the deer pot, lighting bolt pattern, and the many variations of the mimbres patterns. She is related to Emma Lewis-Mitchell, Dolores Lewis-Garcia (sisters), and Drew Lewis (brother).

Publications:

There are numerous  books  referencing Lucy M. Lewis and her daughters, they can be found in:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Fourteen Families in pueblo pottery

-Southwestern pottery Anasazi to Zuni

-Talking with the Clay

-American Indian Pottery 2nd Edition

-Seven Families in Pueblo Pottery

Awards:

-Santa Fe Indian Market Various 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Place numerous years

-Eight Northern 1st various years

-Heard Museum show

-New Mexico State Fair

-Others received too many to list 

Check for work by this artist in our Acoma Pottery section!

Lewis, Diane (Acoma)

Diane Lewis was born in 1960 and is a member of the Lewis family from the Acoma Pueblo (no relation to Lucy Lewis, but a family famous for pottery artists just the same). Each member of this fine family of proven artists are exquisite painters. They are well known for fine handmade pottery, storytellers and clay sculptures. Diane began experimenting with the art of working with clay, and at the age of 21 she mastered the craft of hand coiling pottery using natural pigments and focused more on the rules of the ancient traditional methods of firing outdoors.

 Diane specializes in handmade seed jars, small bowls with mimbres and traditional designs. She paints with soft but crisp colors using natural paints applied with a brush fashioned from the stems of a yucca plant. She gathers her natural pigments from within the Acoma Pueblo. Diane signs her pottery as: Diane Lewis, Acoma, N.M. She is related to Marilyn Lewis-Ray, Judy Lewis, Carolyn Lewis-Concho (sisters), and Kathleen Lewis (mother).

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

-Collections of Southwestern Pottery

-Miniature Arts of the Southwest

Awards:

-1999 Santa Fe Indian Market 2nd Place

-Eight Northern Pueblos Exhibit 1st, 2nd & 3rd

-Santa Fe Indian Market 1st, 2nd & 3rd various years 

Check for work by this artist in our Acoma Pottery section!

Lewis, Drew (Acoma)

Andrew Lewis is a full blooded Native American Indian. He was born in 1927 into the Acoma Pueblo. He was inspired to learn the art of working with clay from his mother, the famed late Lucy Lewis. She taught Drew all the fundamentals of working with clay using the ancient traditional methods that were passed down to her from her ancestors from generation to generation. When Drew was a young child only women were responsible for constructing pottery vessels, however, one day he decided he wanted to learn the methods and construct pottery of his own.

Drew specializes in hand coiled and hand painted traditional pottery vessels. He gathers his raw clumps of clay, sand,  and harvests his natural plants which he uses to boil his colors with from within the Acoma Pueblo. He breaks the clumps of clay down to a fine powder form and sifts the powder for impurities. He hand mixes the powder with water and sand to temper the clay. Once that is done, he begins to roll out his clay into snake like coils and begins building his vessels for the desired shape. When he is finished building the vessel he sets it out to dry. Once it is dry he sands his vessel for a smooth finish and prepares it for painting. His colors are all boiled from natural plants and slips that Mother Earth has provided for him. He begins painting with a stem of a yucca plant that has been fashioned into a brush. His designs are all the traditional mimbres designs and parrot motifs that his ancestors painted many years prior to his birth. Finally, he fires his pottery the traditional way, outdoors. He signs his pottery as: Drew Lewis, Acoma, N.M. He is related to: Andrew Lewis, Jr., Theodore Lewis (sons), Ivan Lewis (brother), Carmel Lewis, Ann Lewis, Emma Lewis-Mitchell, Delores Lewis-Garcia, and Mary Lewis-Garcia (sisters).

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Fourteen Families In Pueblo Pottery

Awards:

-Santa Fe Indian Market

-New Mexico State Fair  

 

Lewis, Judy (Acoma)

Judy Lewis is a full blooded Native American Indian from the Pueblo of Acoma and she was born in 1966. She has been making pottery since 1986. Judy was inspired to continue the family tradition of clay sculpting by observing her many of her family members. She was especially motivated by the passion and ambition that her sister, Marilyn Ray-Lewis, showed towards working with clay, and the assistance that she gave to her. Judy hand coils pottery, vases, and storytellers using the methods of her ancestors. She only uses natural pigments for clay and paints. Judy has developed a style of her own. She hand pinches and hand coils a contemporary shape with traditional designs and colors. As with the entire family the colors have a crisp but soft pastel look to them. Judy is related to the following artists: Kathy Lewis (mother), Carolyn Concho Lewis (sister), and Sharon Lewis (sister). She signs her art work as Judy Lewis, Acoma, N.M.

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

-Collections of Southwestern Pottery

Awards:

-Santa Fe Indian Market

-Gallup Indian Ceremonial Show

-Eighth Northern Pueblos Exhibit 

Check for work by this artist in our Acoma Pottery section!

Lewis, Kathleen (Acoma)

Kathleen Lewis is a full blooded Native American Indian. She was born into the Acoma Pueblo on September 26, 1932. Kathleen is a member of the Yellow Corn Clan. Kathleen learned all the fundamentals of working with clay art and using the ancient traditional hand coiling methods by observing friends and family members.  She was a natural at painting her designs at a very young age.

Kathleen specializes in hand painted polychrome black-on-red jars, bowls, effigy pots, and miniatures.  She gathers her natural slips from within the Acoma Pueblo along with the natural vegetation which is used for making the natural colors used to paint the designs.  She begins by breaking up the plant life that she has gathered such as:  spinach plant which provided the black color, yucca stems are fashioned into brushes for painting, and flowers are used for color.  Then, she boils her pigments and plant life to form just the right colors, and then she begins the hand painting process on preformed vessels.  Once the painting has been complete and the paint has dried Kathleen  fires her pottery in a kiln.  The Lewis family is well known for their exquisite hand painted diverse traditional and contemporary designs.  She signs her pottery as: K.L. Lewis or K. Lewis. She is related to: Toribio & Dolores Sanchez (parents), Josephita Sandoval (grandmother), Ethel Shields (sister), Carolyn Concho, Judy Lewis, Marilyn Ray, Diane Lewis, Rebecca Lucario (daughters), and Bernard Lewis (son). 

 

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies 

 

Lewis, Sharon (Acoma)

Bernard and Sharon Lewis are both a married couple and members of one of the two Lewis families at Acoma Pueblo. A source of confusion for many is the fact that there are two unrelated Lewis families at Acoma. The most famous, of course, is the Lucy Lewis family. However, there is another accomplished Lewis family -- that of Katherine Lewis and her children: Marilyn Henderson Ray, Carolyn Concho, Diane Lewis, Judy Lewis, Rebecca Lucario and Bernard Lewis and his wife, Sharon. Like all members of this family, Bernard and Sharon work with many different colors of paints. Each of the children however, has a distinctive style. Bernard is a potter only and he specializes in pots with three dimensional lizards creeping in and about the pot. Sharon then does the painting of Bernard's pots. Sharon also makes her own pots, always seedpots, decorated with very well painted designs. They are a most talented couple in a very creative family.
 

Check for work by this artist in our Acoma Pottery section!

Lewis, Travis and Rosemary (Santa Clara)

Travis and Rosemary Lewis are full blooded Native Americans born into the Santa Clara-Tewa/Pima Pueblo. Travis was born in 1951 and Rosemary was born in 1952. Rosemary began experimenting with pottery at the age of 9. She was inspired to learn the pottery making process from her Mother, Olaria Sisneros. Travis was inspired by Mary Cain, who is also is a famous potter from the Santa Clara Pueblo. They also were economically motivated to continue the family tradition of pottery making.

Travis and Rosemary specialize in the traditional black Santa Clara hand coiled and etched pottery, featuring kokopelli. They both participate in all procedures of the pottery making process. They dig up the clay from a sacred ground within the Santa Clara Pueblo. There is several different stages involved in order to prepare the clay to begin shaping into pottery. They mix, hand coil, shape, etch, and fire the pottery the traditional way, outdoors. They enjoy etching kokopelli (the flute player) on their pottery. They sign their pottery as Rose M. Lewis, Santa Clara Pueblo, followed by the letter T incorporated into a letter L. Travis and Rosemary are related to many other famous potters, among them are Geraldine Naranjo and Kevin Naranjo (cousins).

Awards:

-None to date

Publications:

-Pueblo Indian Pottery 750 Artist Biographies 

Check for work by this artist in our Santa Clara Pottery section!

Lewis- Garcia, Dolores (Acoma)

Dolores Lewis was born in 1938 into the Acoma Sky City Pueblo. She is one of the daughters of the world renowned late, Lucy M. Lewis. Dolores has been around great pottery artists her whole life, however, her greatest inspiration came down from her mother, Lucy. Dolores was a self taught artisan, she learned the ancient traditional methods of working with clay by carefully observing Lucy construct her beautiful pottery vessels. Dolores chose to continue the long lived tradition of working with pottery, and using the ancient methods passed down to her from her grandmothers because of the importance to keep her peoples traditions alive. Dolores gathers her own natural pigments and  clays from the clay pits within the Acoma Pueblo. She cleans her clay for impurities by hand, then, she hand mixes, hand coils, hand paints, and uses a traditional firing method to add the finishing touch to her wonderful masterpieces which mother earth has blessed her with. The Lewis family keeps the same patterns and does not move to a contemporary style because it is very important to them to keep alive true traditions and designs of the ancient mimbres people alive. Some of these designs which are replicated are the deer with a heartline, lightning bolt pattern, and the many variations of the mimbres patterns. Lucy  was the driving force behind the revival of pottery making as an art in the Pueblo of the Acoma. Dolores is also related to Emma Lewis-Mitchell, Carmel Lewis (sisters), and Drew Lewis (brother).

Publications:

There are many books on Lucy M. Lewis and her daughters, information on these fine artisans can be found in:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Fourteen Families in pueblo pottery

-Southwestern pottery Anasazi to Zuni

-Talking with the Clay

-American Indian Pottery 2nd Edition

-Seven Families in Pueblo Pottery

Awards:

-Santa Fe Indian Market Various 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Place numerous years

-Eight Northern 1st various years

-Heard Museum show

-New Mexico State Fair

-Others received too many to list 

 

Lewis-Mitchell, Emma (Acoma)

Emma Lewis-Mitchell was born in 1931 into the Acoma Sky City Pueblo. She is one of the daughters of the world renowned late, Lucy M. Lewis. Emma was around great pottery artists her whole life, however, her greatest inspiration came down from her mother, Lucy. Emma was a self taught artisan, she learned the ancient traditional methods of working with clay by carefully observing Lucy construct her beautiful pottery vessels. Emma chose to continue the long lived tradition of working with pottery, and using the ancient methods passed down to her from her grandmothers because of the importance to keep her peoples traditions alive. Emma gathers her own natural pigments and  clays from the clay pits within the Acoma Pueblo. She cleans her clay for impurities by hand, then, she hand mixes, hand coils, hand paints, and uses a traditional firing method to add the finishing touch to her wonderful masterpieces which mother earth has blessed her with. The Lewis family keeps the same patterns and does not move to a contemporary style because it is very important to them to keep alive true traditions and designs of the ancient mimbres people alive. Some of these designs which are replicated are the deer with a heartline, lightning bolt pattern, and the many variations of the mimbres patterns. Lucy  was the driving force behind the revival of pottery making as an art in the Pueblo of the Acoma. Emma is also related to Dolores Lewis-Garcia, Carmel Lewis (sisters), and Drew Lewis (brother).

Publications:

There are many books on Lucy M. Lewis and her daughters, information on these fine artisans can be found in:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Fourteen Families in pueblo pottery

-Southwestern pottery Anasazi to Zuni

-Talking with the Clay

-American Indian Pottery 2nd Edition

-Seven Families in Pueblo Pottery

Awards:

-Santa Fe Indian Market Various 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Place numerous years

-Eight Northern 1st various years

-Heard Museum show

-New Mexico State Fair

-Others received too many to list 

 

Lonewolf, Greg (Santa Clara)

Greg Lonewolf is the son of famed Santa Clara potter Joseph Lonewolf.

Like his father, Greg makes exquisite sgrafitto pottery focusing on wildlife scenes in a polychrome style.

In recent years, Greg has found little time for pottery making as his lifetime interest in firefighting landed him a job with the Espanola Fire Dept. In the past year he has been promoted from Lieutenant to Captain to Battalion Chief. Consequently, he made 7 pots in 2001.

Greg has two talented sisters as well. Susan Romero and Rosemary Lonewolf both pot in the sgrafitto style and are quite well known. The patriarch of this amazing family was Greg's late grandfather, Camilio Sunflower Tafoya.
 

Loretto, Fannie (Jemez)

Fannie Loretto, “Little Turqoise”, was born in 1951. She is half Jemez and half Laguna, She is a member of the water clan. She began making pottery at the age of 16. Fannie has been hand coiling clay sculptures and masks for over 22 years, prior to that she made several shapes of hand coiled pottery using traditional ancient methods which were passed down to her from several members in her family.

Fannie was inspired to learn the art of working with clay by assisting her mother, Carrie Reid Loretto make her pottery., Carrie specialized in hand coiled pottery. Fannie gathers all her natural pigments from within the Jemez Pueblo. Then, she grinds, cleans, mixes the clay, hand pinches, shapes, paints, and fires her art, outdoors the traditional way. Fannie stated that: “the masks are my favorite to create because it’s like drawing in 3-D, when I make them.” Fannie is well known for her koshari masks, and she makes them in several different sizes and adds ribbons, feathers, horse hair, and corn husks to compliment her art. She signs her pottery as: Fannie Loretto, followed by the water sign to denote her Clan origin.

 Fannie is a talented artist who is committed to uphold the tradition of hand made pottery.  Her work has been recognized with many awards including best of show at the Heard Museum and eight Northern Pueblos show.

 Others have often asked why she does not use a ceramic mold to make her masks more easily. She would not hear of it! Each piece is carefully crafted by hand, the traditional way, so that each one has a unique expression and character. She recently told me a story in which she had just finished several masks and they were all hanging on a wall.  As she sat checking over them, she said you could almost hear all of the incredible laughs each mask would produce with its unique expression. Artists with such passion in their work are becoming harder and harder to find these days. Fannie is an artist of true tradition.


 

Loretto-Maestas, Alma (Jemez/Laguna)

Alma Loretto (Concha) Maestas, “Painted Parrot”, member of the Water Clan was born in 1941. She is half Jemez and half Laguna. She was inspired to continue the tradition of pottery making by her Mother, Carrie Reid Loretto. Alma was introduced into pottery making at the age of 7. Alma specializes in handmade Jemez Pueblo clay figurines, storytellers, koshares, nativity’s, and can also hand coil traditional pottery. She began experimenting with clay and decided that she enjoyed making figurines most. She paints with natural colors and fires her pottery the traditional way. Alma currently signs her pottery as:  ALMA, followed by a water symbol to denote her clan origin. Alma is also related to the following artists: Dorothy, Lupe, Edna, Fannie, Josephine, and the late Mary Loretto, all sisters.

Awards:

-ENIPC Artists and Craftsman Show 1st

-Eighth Northern Indian Pueblos

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-The Pueblo Storyteller

-Nacimientos

-Storytellers and Other Figurative Pottery

-Pueblo Stories and Storytellers

-Featured in National Geographic May 1982

Permanent Collections:

-Smithsonian Museum

-Plymouth Historical Society Museum

-Sipapu Gallery, Plymouth MI

-Other awards, publications and permanent collections too numerous to list

 

Loretto-Riley, Angie (Jemez)

Angie Loretto-Riley, is a full blooded Native American Indian, born into the Pueblo of the Jemez, in 1955. Angie was inspired to learn the art of working with clay by her mother, Lenora Gachupin, at the age of 12, she was taught where to gather the clay, how to mix it, hand coil, paint, and finally, how to fire the pottery, shortly after that she began experimenting with clay and hand making little pots and gradually began making storytellers.

Angie specializes in handmade storytellers but does not limit her abilities to only do that, she also hand coils friendship pots. She enjoys making the larger storytellers, because she likes the challenge, of putting as many babies on the doll, as she can fit onto it. She signs her pottery as Angie Loretto, Jemez.

Angie is related to the following artists: Lucy Toya, Bea Riley (sisters), Felecia Loretto, and Anita Cajero (nieces). 

 

Louis, Gary "Yellowcorn" and Corrine (Acoma)

(Gary pictured left, Irvin on the Right)

Gary Louis and his wife, Corrine, are Acoma potters. Corrine is a third generation potter from the Marie Z. Chino family. Corrine and Gary are carrying on the family tradition of working with pottery. They first came across the idea of using human hair on their pottery when one of her own strands of hair fell on a piece as it was being removed from the oven and scorched the pot. It was from this accident that they decided to use this method to decorate their pottery. The human hair leaves lighter marks than the traditional horsehair. Over several years of trial and error they mastered the art of "Human Hair Pottery." Gary has won several awards at the New Mexico State Fair for his contemporary Acoma pottery. The hair burns when it touches the hot pottery leaving a light stain cooked into it, making a beautiful and unique one of a kind pattern on each piece. The piece is then completely etched by hand.

Check for work by this artist in our Horsehair Pottery section!

Louis, Irvin (Acoma)

(Gary pictured left, Irvin on the Right)

Irvin was born in 1955 on the Acoma Pueblo. His Indian name is "Vines of the Melon" of the Yellow Corn Clan. Irvin was inspired to learn the art of working with clay from his Grandmother and Aunt. Acoma traditions are extremely important to him. He began working with clay at the age of 14. He was taught the fundamentals and methods of hand coiling traditional pottery passed down to him by his family members.

Irvin now specializes in working with contemporary style pottery. He learned the technique of producing the Horse-Hair pottery. The kiln is set to a certain temperature and then the horse hair taken from the main or tail is tossed randomly on the heated pottery. The resulting carbon being drawn into the surface of the pottery creates the wonderful designs and patterns.

All of Irvin's work is Hand Etched. The process of producing the work of art is very time consuming. He is only one of a few Acoma potters that makes Horse Hair Pottery. He signs each piece: Irvin J Louis, Acoma.

 

Lucario, Arthur and Velma (Acoma/Laguna)

Arthur Lucario was born in 1942. He is half Acoma and half Laguna. He started out as a silver smith, where he made jewelry and eventually learned how to craft pottery and hand carve Hopi style kachinas. He was inspired to craft pottery by his sister, Sally Garcia.

Arthur specializes in the hand etched ceramic pottery with the red and black etchings. Arthur also carves kachinas on cotton woodroot. He paints on the colors and then crafts his designs on the pottery. He crafts a wide variety of shapes and sizes. He doesn’t use stencils at all. He draws his designs on the greenware and then etches his pottery. His wife, Velma Lucario will often help Arthur with his art. Arthur signs his pottery as: R&V Lucario, Laguna.

Awards:

-1995 New Mexico State Fair 1st place

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies 

 

Lucario, Ramond (Laguna)

Raymond “Ray“ J. Lucario is a full blooded Native American Indian who was born into the Laguna Pueblo in 1971. Ray  was given the Indian name of Sunrise at a young age. Ray was inspired to learn the art of hand carving kachina dolls on cottonwood root by the admiration he had for Hopi artist’s work. He began experimenting with wood at the age of 16, and has continued to perfect his carvings since that time. His family and friends encouraged him to learn some sort of art so that he may add to a long lived legacy of  Native American Indians. The lucrative aspect of the business also played a key roll in his decision to become an artist.

Ray hand carves cottonwood root into magnificent full bodied kachina dolls with a simple tool, like a pocket knife. His dolls are carved with extreme precision and detail. He applies acrylic paints to his dolls and paints them very carefully because it is essential to represent the kachina’s as accurately as possible. Ray signs his dolls as: R. Lucario, Laguna.

Ray is related to the following artists: Arthur Lucario (father) and Sally Garcia (aunt).

Awards:

-New Mexico State Fair various years

 

Lucero, Joyce (Jemez)

Joyce is from the Jemez Pueblo, Fire Clan, and has been making storytellers for over 20 years. She was taught by Mary Lucero, her mother, who is also very well known for her storytellers.

Joyce's work is presented at The Indian Craft Shop, U.S. Department of the Interior, Washington, D.C. and included in Southwestern Pottery: Anasazi to Zuni by Hayes and Blom, Berger and Schiffer's Pueblo and Navajo Contemporary Pottery, and several other publications.

Check for work by this artist in our Jemez Pottery section!

Lucero, Mary I. (Jemez)

Mary I. Lucero, “Walatowa”, is a full blooded Native American Indian. She was born into the Jemez Pueblo in 1957. She was inspired to learn the art of hand coiling and hand pinching pottery, using ancient traditional methods passed to her by her Sister, Virginia Lucero. She learned to construct storytellers at the age of 20 in 1977. Working with clay is also a supplement of income to help raise her children.

Mary specializes in the handmade pueblo style storytellers. She gathers her own clay from the sacred grounds within the Jemez Pueblo. Then, she cleans the clay, mixes, hand coils, shapes, paints, and fires her clay sculptures using ancient methods used by her ancestors. She uses all natural pigments for colors to accent her pottery. Mary was also taught the fundamentals of hand coiling pottery. However, she enjoys making her storytellers thoroughly. According to Mary it is a wonderful way to relax and clear your mind of all the stress involved with being a parent and working full time. Mary signs her pottery as: M.I. Lucero, Jemez. Mary is related to the following artists: Virginia A. Lucero (sister), and Carol Gachupin (cousin).

Awards:

-None to date

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Southwestern Indian Foundation Catalog 

 

Lucero, Mary R. (Jemez)

Mary R. Lucero is a full blooded Native American Indian. She was born into the Jemez Pueblo in 1948. Mary was inspired to learn the art of working with clay by her Grandmother, Magnita Lucero. Magnita introduced Mary to the hills that provided the best clay. Then, Mary gathers other natural pigments from the sacred grounds within the Jemez pueblo. Magnita taught Mary how to mix, shape, paint, and fire pottery the traditional way, outdoors. She began hand coiling her pottery at the age of 14, when she would watch her grandmother make her pottery the traditional way.

Mary specializes in the handmade pueblo styled storytellers, but does not limit her abilities. She also makes animals, nativity’s and other clay sculptures. Mary uses natural colors to paint her pottery. Mary signs her pottery as: Mary R. Lucero, Jemez.

Mary is related to the following artists: Carol Gachupin (sister), Mary I. Lucero (cousin), Diane Lucero, and Joyce Lucero (daughters).

Awards:

-1999 New Mexico State Fair 4th Place

-Jemez Red Rock Art Show 2nd place

Publications:

-Southwestern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

 

 

Lucero, Virginia (Jemez)

Virginia A. Lucero, member of the Fire Clan, is a full blooded Native American Indian. She was born in 1964 into the Jemez Pueblo. Virginia was inspired to learn the art of working with clay from her friend, Marie Romero, who comes from a long line of famous pottery artisans. Marie taught Virginia all the fundamentals of working with clay using ancient traditional methods. Marie also shared special techniques to make her tasks easier. Virginia began experimenting with clay at the age of 14. The lucrative aspect of the business also played a key role in her becoming an artist.

Virginia specializes in handmade storytellers. She gathers her clay from the hills within the Jemez Pueblo. She soaks the clay, hand grinds the clay, cleans the clay for imperfections, hand mixes, hand coils, hand shapes, and sands the sculpture by hand. Then, Virginia hand paints her finished products and fires her sculptures, outdoors, with cedar chips. The colors Virginia uses to paint her storytellers are boiled together from natural pigments and minerals also found within the Jemez Pueblo. She accents her sculptures with pieces of miniature pottery, painted jewelry, and toys. She signs her sculptures as: V. Lucero, Jemez, followed by a  rain cloud. She is related to the following artists: Carol Lucero-Gachupin, Mary Rose Lucero (cousins), and Mary I. Lucero (sister). 

 

Lucero-Gauchupin, Carol (Jemez)

Carol Lucero-Gachupin, is a full blooded Native American Indian. She was born into the Pueblo of the Jemez, in 1958. Carol was inspired to learn the art of hand coiling pottery by Marie Romero, who is well known for making pottery and storytellers. Carol specializes in the Navajo/Hopi, handmade butterfly storytellers. Her styles of storytellers have a nice blanket wrapped around the dolls, or she will make them with a flared skirt.

 

Carol gathers and sifts her own clays and hand shapes them to her liking, and then fires her figures, outdoors, the traditional way. Carol was quoted as saying: “I love making storytellers because, it reminds me of my grandparents telling us stories when we were growing up.” She signs her storytellers as: Lucero-Gachupin followed by a kiva step symbol. Carol is related to the following artists: Marie Romero, Mary Lucero, and Diane Lucero.

Awards:

-2000 New Mexico State Fair 2nd Place

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Collections of Southwestern Pottery 

 

Lucero-Loretto, Lupe (Jemez/Laguna)

Leonora Lupe Lucero-Loretto, “Sun Flower”, is a full blooded Native American Indian. Lupe was born in 1943. She is half Jemez and half Laguna. She began making her pottery sculptures at the age of 34. Lupe was inspired to make pottery by her sister, Dorothy Trujillo.

Lupe specializes in the handmade humorous Koshari storytellers, but does not limit herself to that. She also hand coils nativity's and other clay sculptures. She gathers her own clay, sand, and other natural pigments from the hills within the Jemez pueblo, then, she cleans the clay, mixes sand with clay together, and begins to hand coil her sculptures. Lupe also paints her art with the natural colors that she hand mixes as well, and finally, she fires her art the traditional way, outdoors. She add corn stalks to add a bit of flare to her work. Lupe signs her pottery as: L Lupe L Lucero.

Lupe is also related to the following artists: Alma Concho, Marie Loretto, Fannie Loretto, and the late Mary Toya (all sisters).

 

Awards:

-New Mexico State Fair 1st Place

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-The Pueblo Storyteller

-Storytellers and Other Figurative Pottery 

 

Mansfield, Louis and Nadine (Acoma)

Louis & Nadine Mansfield are full blooded Native American Indians from the Laguna Pueblo and the Acoma Pueblo. Louis was born in 1967 and Nadine was born in 1968. They were taught the fundamentals of pottery making from several different artists, including Betty Ramirez-Concho (mother).   The continuance of family traditions is extremely important to these fine artists. Nadine was 17 years of age when her interest in pottery making evolved. She would assist other artisans with their work and Nadine learned several different methods of the clay process.

Louis & Nadine specialize in handmade pottery. They both assist each other in every aspect of working with the clay. They gather natural pigments found within the Acoma Pueblo. They clean, mix, coil, shape, paint, and fire their pottery in a kiln. One of their trademarks is the lizards climbing all over the pottery. The lizards represent good luck and a long life. They make a wide variety of sizes, shapes, and paint intricate traditional patterns. They sign their pottery as: Louis, Nadine Mansfield, Acoma.

Awards:

-1997 New Mexico State Fair 2nd Place

-1998 New Mexico State Fair 3rd Place 

Check for work by this artist in our Acoma Pottery section!

Martinez, Alice and Ruben (San Ildelfonso)

Alice Martinez and her son, Ruben have formed a partnership with pottery making. They are from the Pueblo of San Ildefonso/Tewa. Alice is now in her seventies, and has been making pottery since she was twenty years old. Alice was inspired to continue the long lived tradition of hand coiling pottery from her parents, Richard and Lucy Martinez. Ruben learned the fundamentals of pottery making from his mother and now they have joined forces and combined their efforts to make some of the finest black on black pottery available today.

Over the last fifty years, Alice and Ruben have perfected the Tunyo Polychrome mate on polished black style pottery that the Martinez family from San Ildefonso had become famous for back in the early 1900’s. They make pottery the traditional way; they gather the clay from sacred grounds within the San Ildefonso Pueblo, clean the clay,hand coil, shape, and fire the traditional way, outdoors, with horse manure.

 Alice’s father, Richard Martinez was the adopted son of the famous Maria Martinez.

Awards:

-Eight Northern Pueblos Exhibit

-Pueblo Indian Pottery 750 Artist Biographies 

 

Martinez, Barbara (Santa Clara)

Barbara Martinez is part of a large family of Santa Clara potters.

Her mother was the late well-respected potter Flora Martinez. Barbara's siblings are all potters: Frances Salazar, Glenda Naranjo and Sammy Naranjo.

Barbara's daughter, Vickie Martinez, is a fine potter and Vickie's children, though still in their teens, are already making excellent pottery.

Barbara works in the traditional Santa Clara style of deeply carved black forms in a variety of sizes and shapes.

Martinez, Vickie (Santa Clara)

Vickie Martinez “Koe-Sawe”, Buffalo Steps, is a full blooded Native American Indian. She was born into the Pueblo of Santa Clara-Tewa in 1967. Vickie was inspired to continue the long lived tradition of her ancestors of working with clay from her Mother, Barbara Martinez. She has been making pottery since 1983, when she was 15 years old.

Vickie specializes in the traditional handmade black and red Santa Clara pottery. She gathers her own natural pigments (clay) from the hills within the Santa Clara Pueblo. Vickie hand coils, shapes, carves, fires and polishes her pottery using all traditional methods. Vickie was quoted as saying: “I find etching a very challenging and rewarding experience, which I am enjoying thoroughly.” Vickie signs her pottery as: Vickie Martinez, Santa Clara Pueblo.

Vickie is related to the following artists: Barbara Martinez (mother), Glenda Naranjo, Frances Salazar (aunts), Sammy Naranjo, Chris Martinez and Manuel Martinez (brothers).

Awards:

-Eighth Northern 2nd place

-New Mexico State Fair

Publications:

-Pueblo Indian Pottery 750 Artist Biographies 

 

McKelvey, Lucy Luppe (Navajo)

Lucy Leuppe McKelvey is a Native American Indain from the Navajo Reservation.  She is known as an innovator in the native american art world.

The whole philosophy of Navajo culture is one of beauty and harmony. That is what I am doing with my pots; this is what my girls are doing. We are creating Navajo beauty from Navajo materials. Everything you see on a pot has come from Mother Earth, from the clay to the paint - everything. The pots don’t look like traditional Navajo pots, but the uses for those are not needed as much today. There is always a need for beauty. Especially Navajo beauty.-- Lucy Leuppe McKelvey

Lucy was raised by her grandparents, her grandmother a Navajo weaver, her grandfather a Navajo medicine man, Lucy did not learn to make pottery until she was in college in 1973.  After graduating from college, Lucy taught elementary school in for a few years. She then took five years off to raise her three daughters, Cecilia, Celeste, and Celinda. Self-taught, she introduced clay to her daughters. They  eventually learned to contruct pottery. She would invite neighboring potters and learn by watching them as well as examining pottery shards she would find outside her grandmother’s house.  Lucy’s ideas are taken from  sandpaintings and other Anasazi designs on her pots. This is a break from the traditional pottery designs. Sandpaintings are sacred to the Navajo People. Depicting a sandpainting as a permanent drawing and then burning it is sacrilegious to her people. The Yeis depicted are believed to be far too powerful. A way around this is to leave the design unfinished or to change it in some way so that the Yei is able to escape from the piece.

My grandfather, who was a medicine man, told me that it was okay to paint these designs as long as I did not exactly reproduce a sandpainting figure. That is why, while I take some inspiration from a sandpainting, I always change it and add something different.-- Lucy Leuppe McKelvey

Lucy gathers her clays, minerals, and pigments near Low Mountain, Arizona.  She hand mixes her clay with temper to develop all paints with materials from Mother Earth.   Use of intricate sandpainting designs with graceful curves added to the vessels are the hallmarks of  her pottery. 

Lucy has been an exhibitor at the famed Indian Market since 1975 and has won numerous awards at various art shows around the country, including the Santa Fe Indian Market.  

 

Medina, Elizabeth (Zia)

Elizabeth Medina, “Sepia”, was born  in 1956 into the Jemez Pueblo. She married into the Zia Pueblo. She was inspired by her Mother-in-Law, Sofia Medina, to learn the art of working with clay. Elizabeth observed Sofia with much enthusiasm in hopes of achieving the same skills. It appears from what Elizabeth has accomplished, that she has achieved her goal.

Elizabeth specializes in the handmadetraditional Zia pottery with traditional symbols and birds. She digs up her own clay, cleans, mixes, coils, shapes, fires, and paints her pottery the traditional way, with natural colors. Elizabeth signs her pottery as: Elizabeth Medina, Zia. Elizabeth is related to the following artists: Marcellus Medina (husband), Lois Medina (sister-in-law), and Sofia Medina (mother-in-law).

Awards:

-Santa Fe Indian Market

-Eighth Northern Arts and Crafts Show

-Colorado Indian Art Show

-Other awards too numerous to list

-Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Talking With The Clay

-Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery

-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni 

 

Medina, Marcellus (Zia)

Marcellus Medina was born into the Zia Pueblo in 1954. He was inspired to continue the family tradition of pottery making by his ancestors, the support of many people, creative inspiration, and economic motivation.

              Marcellus is a painter from Zia Pueblo. He paints traditional and contemporary images in watercolors and acrylics. He is a self taught painter and has been painting since the age of 10. He has devoted the majority of his life to being an art student and currently is still a practicing artist. Marcellus signs his pottery as: Medina, year, and accents it with a zia bird symbol, Marcellus is related to the following artists: Elizabeth Medina (spouse), Sofia Medina (mother), and Lois Medina (sister).

Awards:

-1999 Santa Fe Indian Market 1st Place

-1999 Santa Fe Indian Market 3rd Place

-Santa Fe Indian Market several awards

-New Mexico State Fair Best of Show

-Southwest Indian Painting Convocation

-Others awards too numerous to list

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

-Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery

-American Indian Pottery

-Talking With The Clay

-Southwestern Pottery 1999 Edition

-Others too numerous to list

Displayed permanent collections:

-Albuquerque International Airport, Alb. NM

-Boston Museum of Fine Art, Boston MA

-School of American Research, Santa Fe NM  

 

Medina, Sophia and Lois (Zia)

Sofia Medina and Lois Medina are a mother and daughter team which with combined efforts produce some of the finest Zia Pueblo pottery around today. Sofia was born in 1932 and Lois was born in 1959. Sofia has been making pottery since 1963. Trinidad Medina, who was a prolific and one of Zia’s finest potter’s, taught her all the fundamentals of making traditional Zia pottery and encouraged her to continue the long lived family tradition of hand coiling pottery.

                  Sofia and Lois specialize in making hand coiled Zia pottery just like their ancestors before them. All the materials used on their pottery come from within the Zia Pueblo. The clay is gathered from the grounds within the pueblo. They clean, mix, hand coil, shape, paint, and fire the pottery the traditional way, outdoors. The colors are derived from natural plant life and minerals also found within the Zia Pueblo. They both contribute equally while constructing their pottery. Trinidad encouraged Sofia to teach each and every one of her children the art of hand coiling traditional Zia pottery, so they may be able to contribute to the legacy which is bestowed upon them as well. Sofia & Lois said, “Spiritually, making pottery eases your mind, and we sing and pray while making our pottery.” They sign their pottery as: Sofia Medina-Lois Medina, Zia.

They are related to Marcellus Medina and Herman Medina (sons/brothers).

 

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery

-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

-Talking with the Clay

Awards:

-Santa Fe Indian Market

-New Mexico State Fair

-Eighth Northern Arts & Crafts Show

Collections:

-Albuquerque International Airport

-Smithsonian in Washington, D.C.

 

Mountain, West (Lacuna/Cochiti)

West Mountain is a full blooded Native American Indian. He was born in 1975 and is a member of the Lizard Clan. He is half Laguna Pueblo and half Cochiti Pueblo. West is extremely proud of his heritage and participates in the traditions and ceremonies of his people. He was inspired to learn the art of working with pottery from several family members and various friends. He comes from a family that reinforces the traditional ways of their ancestors. Art has always come naturally to West. When he was a young boy he drew many kachinas and fine line designs on paper. Eventually, he got the idea to put his work on pottery. This developed and improved his drawing skills and techniques. He has been crafting pottery since 1998.

West Mountain specializes in hand crafting Santa Clara pottery. He draws sgraffito designs of highly respected kachinas on his pottery. West uses his steady hand to etch his finely detailed warriors, maidens, and fine line designs of a time when life seemed so much more simple.Then, he accents his pottery with quality turquoise stones to add a unique flare to his art. West is in the early stages of establishing himself as an fine artisan, and he is very proud of this accomplishments to date. His favorite kachina to create is the Poli Kachina, other wise known as the Butterfly Kachina, because of the special dances they perform and their beauty. There is over 300 recognized Kachinas and they represent different spiritual beings that are believed to guide Native American People on the right path of life. He signs his pottery as: West Mountain, Laguna, N.M.

Awards:

-1999 New Mexico State Fair 2nd Place

-2000 New Mexico State Fair 3rd Place

-2001 New Mexico State Fair 1st Place

-2001 New Mexico State Fair 3rd Place

-2001 New Mexico State Fair 4th Place

 

Naha, Burel (Hopi)

Burel Hughes Naha, “Long Hair Kachina”, member of the Spider Clan was born into the Hopi-Tewa Reservation in 1944. He was inspired to learn the art of traditional pottery making at the age of 7 from his famous Mother, the late Helen Naha.

              Burel specializes in the handmade traditional Hopi pottery, but he has created his own unique style. He enjoys painting spiders with intricate web designs all around his pottery. The earlier designs that he used were Helen’s until his daughter, Cynthia Naha brought home a computerized photo of a spider which she drew. Cynthia told him that they were drawing insects and spiders in class. He was hypnotized by the design and late one night he couldn’t get the spider out of his thoughts. He decided to experiment with the spider pattern on his pottery and this is where his idea was originated from. People refer to him as Spider-man. Burel received his BA at Brigham Young University. He was a teacher for many years and now has dedicated his life to his wonderful uniquely painted pottery. Burel credits his success to his mother for teaching him the traditional ways of their ancestors. Now he can also teach his children so that they may continue the Hopi traditions and won't get lost and forgotten. Burel signs his pottery as: Long Hair Kachina (symbol), followed by a feather design.

 

Burel comes from a long line of famous potters which includes: the famous Sylvia Naha, Rainell Naha (sisters), the famous Paqua Naha (grandmother), and the famous Joy “Frogwoman”.Navasie (aunt).

 

Awards:

-New Mexico State Fair 1st and 2nd Place

-Gallup Ceremonial 1st and 2nd Place

Publications:

-Art of the Hopi

-Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery

-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

-Hopi-Tewa Pottery 500 Artist Biographies

Burel has pottery displayed in many museum art collections 

 

Naha, Sylvia (Hopi) Deceased

Sylvia Naha Humphrey, member of the Spider Clan, was born in 1951 into the Hopi-Tewa Reservation. She is the grand daughter of the late “Paqua Naha”, who was among the most famous and prolific Hopi-Tewa potters to ever have lived. Paqua’s first name means “frog” in the Spanish language. She is known as “Frog Woman”. Sylvia is also the daughter of the late Helen Naha “Feather Woman”.

Sylvia specializes in hand coiled Hopi white slip pottery. She learned all the fundamentals of traditional pottery making from her mother, Helen “Feather Woman” Naha.

Sylvia gathers her clay and other materials from the Hopi lands including natural pigments used for color on her pottery. She cleans, mixes, shapes, sands, paints, and fires her pottery outdoors, the traditional way with sheep dung. Many of the designs Sylvia paints on her pottery are Helen’s but she will incorporate them with her own. Sylvia signs her pottery as: A feather symbol followed by a letter “S”. Burel Naha (brother), Joy “Frog Woman II”Navasie (aunt), Dee Setalla (cousin), Eunice “Fawn” Navasie, and Dawn Navasie (cousin) are among some of the famous potters that Sylvia is related to.

Publications:

-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

-Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery

-Hopi-Tewa Pottery 500 Artist Biographies

-Southwestern Pottery 1999 Edition

 

Namoki, Valerie (Hopi)

Valerie Namoki is a gifted Hopi-Tewa artist who is becoming well known for her sculpted pottery kachinas. Valerie learned the art of making pottery from her grandmother, Carol Namoki. She was also inspired by her father Virgil, a Hopi kachina carver, who taught her the art of carving. She blended the two mediums to create her own beautiful pottery kachinas.

Check for work by this artist in our Hopi Pottery section!

Naha-Nampeyo, Marty & Elvira (Hopi)

This husband and wife team is quickly rising to the top of their division.  Known for their development of the incised red ware (introduced by Elvira’s father, Tom Polacca), Marty and Elvira have nearly perfected the Kachina element captured in each of their unique pieces.  Both Marty and Elvira come from a long line of potters.  Elvira being the Great-Granddaughter of Nampeyo, and Marty is the son of Emma Naha.  Their heritage and involvement with daily Hopi culture has given them an advantage.  They have shown their pottery throughout the Southwest.  Marty and Elvira’s pieces can be seen in many publications and museums dealing with elaborate Indian art.

Check for work by this artist in our Hopi Pottery section!

Nampeyo, Adel (Hopi)

Adelle Lalo-Nampeyo was born into the Hopi-Tewa Nation in 1959. She is one of the great granddaughters of the famous “Nampeyo”, known for reviving and expanding the beautiful ancient style of pottery called Sikyatki. She was inspired to learn the art of pottery making from her Mother, the late Elva Nampeyo. She has been making pottery since 1979.

Adelle specializes in the handmade traditional ancient Sikyatki polychrome pottery which her family is famous for. All of her materials are from Mother Earth. She hand coils all of her pottery the traditional way. She enjoys making seed pots most of all because they are easier to work with. Her favorite design is the fine line and eagle tail. She strongly believes that she needs to continue making pottery the traditional way because of her strong spiritual beliefs. Adelle is now teaching her children the art that her ancestors have taught her so that they can continue in her foot steps.

Adelle signs her pottery as: Adelle L. Nampeyo, followed by a corn symbol to proudly denote her clan origin.

Awards:

-Gallup Ceremonial

Publications:

-Hopi-Tewa Pottery 500 Artist Biographies

-Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery

 

Nampeyo, Carla (Hopi)

Clara Nampeyo was born in 1961; she is the daughter of the well-known Hopi/Tewa potter Thomas Polacca, Granddaughter of Fannie Polacca and Great-Granddaughter of Nampeyo.  Carla learned their traditional way of making pottery, the golden hued bowls with fine line painting.    Besides emulating these two styles, Carla went on to develop another style with a rich, chocolate slip depicting animal and Kachina carvings, she also does pottery in traditional “Polychrome”.  Carla has won numerous awards for her pottery.

Check for work by this artist in our Hopi Pottery section!

Nampeyo, Nyla (Hopi)

Nyla “Nampeyo” Sahmie, member of the Corn Clan, was born in 1954 into the Hopi Reservation. She was taught the art of constructing Hopi pottery, using ancient traditional methods, passed down to her from her mother, Priscilla Namingha-Nampeyo. Nyla began experimenting with pottery at the age of 13. She has continued this long lived family tradition just like her ancestors have before her. Her goal is to become one of the finest potters ever just like the famed Nampeyo. Nyla is a fifth generation of Nampeyo potters currently working with clay.

Nyla specializes in hand coiled yellow-orange traditional pottery. She gathers her clay, grinds it down, cleans the clay, mixes, hand coils, sands, paints her designs, and fires the pottery, outdoors, with sheep dung. Her favorite patterns to paint are: migrations, double hummingbirds, and flowers. She recently has begun to hand coiling very large olla pots. Nyla stated, “Making pottery has come naturally to me and I am honored to be a member of one of the most famous Native American Family names”. She signs her pottery as: Nyla  Nampeyo, followed by a corn symbol to denote her Clan origin.

Nyla currently is working with children at local Elementary Schools and High Schools in her area, educating the youth about the Hopi heritage and culture. She does this so that the tradition of the Hopi ways of life are continued and not forgotten.

Awards:

-Eighth Northern Arts and Crafts Show

Publications:

-Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery

-Hopi-Tewa Pottery 500 Artist Biographies 

 

Naranjo, Dusty (Santa Clara)

Dusty Naranjo was born in 1968 into the Santa Clara Pueblo. She is the daughter of Bernice Naranjo. Dusty learned how to hand coil traditional pottery when she was approximately twenty years old.  Dusty was inspired to learn the art of pottery making by observing her Mother, and her Brother, Forest Naranjo, both well know pottery artists from the Santa Clara Pueblo.

Dusty chose to continue hand coiling the sienna firing style, which is a color in-between that of the traditional Santa Clara black and red. The sienna style, or technique is the style the “Naranjo Family” is well known for making. This is a contemporary style started in the late 1960’s and early 1970’s, however, this style is now considered a staple style from the Santa Clara Pueblo. She gathers her natural pigments from within the hills of the Santa Clara Pueblo and uses traditional methods while making her fine masterpieces. Dusty etches animals, geometric designs, and symbols on her pottery to add a bit of contemporary flare to her traditional pottery. She signs her pottery as: Dusty.

Publications:

-Collections of Southwestern Pottery

-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

-Pueblo Indian Pottery 750 Artist Biographies

Awards:

-New Mexico State Fair

-Santa Fe Indian Market

Check for work by this artist in our Santa Clara Pottery section!

Naranjo, Forrest (Santa Clara)

Forrest Naranjo was born in 1963 into the Santa Clara Pueblo. He was economically motivated to learn the art of pottery making. He began making pottery back in 1986 at the age of 23. He also was inspired to hand coil pottery by his creativity.

Forrest specializes in the handmade Sienna style or technique, which the Naranjo family is known for today. The Sienna firing is a color in between that of the traditional black or red, which was started back in the 1960’s and 1970’s. It is now referred to as the Staple style from the Santa Clara Pueblo. Forrest mixes, hand coils, shapes, etches, and fires his pottery the traditional way, outdoors. His etching will include animals, feathers, and many different creative designs which he imagines. He also shapes his clay into bear sculptures, which he is well known for and enjoys making. He signs his pottery as: Forrest. Forrest is related to Bernice Naranjo (mother) and Dusty Naranjo

Awards:

-New Mexico State Fair

-Gallup Indian Ceremonial

 

Publications:

-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

-Miniature Arts of the Southwest

-Collections of Southwestern Pottery

-Pueblo Indian Pottery 750 Artist Biographies 

Check for work by this artist in our Santa Clara Pottery section!

Naranjo, Glenda (Santa Clara)

Glenda Naranjo, “Cloth Stick Flower”, is a full blooded Native American Indian. She was born in 1953 into the Santa Clara-Tewa Pueblo. Glenda was inspired to continue the long lived tradition of hand coiling pottery from her late mother, Flora Naranjo. Flora taught Glenda all the fundamentals of working with clay and using ancient methods to construct her pottery. Glenda has been working with clay since the age of 10. The lucrative aspect of the business also played a key roll in her becoming a clay artist.

Glenda specializes in hand coiling traditional black on black and red Santa Clara pottery. She gathers her clay from the grounds within the Santa Clara Pueblo. Glenda soaks the clay, grinds it to a sandy grain, hand mixes, hand coils, hand shapes, hand carves, and fires her finished product the traditional way, outdoors, with horse dung. Her patterns include the Water Serpent and Feather diagrams. She hand coils a wide variety of sizes and shapes of traditional pottery. Glenda enjoys working with clay and feels that in doing so, she proudly adds to the art world and continues the long lived legacy of her people. She currently is also teaching her immediate family to construct the beautiful pottery that her Pueblo is famous for making. She signs her pottery as: Glenda Naranjo, SCP. Glenda is related to: Frances Salazar, Barbara Martinez, Vickie Martinez, and Sammy Naranjo.

Awards:

-New Mexico State Fair 1st Place

-New Mexico State Fair 2nd Place

-New Mexico State Fair 3rd Place

-Santa Fe Indian Market 2nd Place

Publications:

-Pueblo Indian Pottery 750 Artist Biographies.

 

Naranjo, Kevin (Santa Clara)

Kevin Naranjo, “Turquoise Mountain”, was born into the Santa Clara Pueblo in 1972. He was inspired to learn and continue the long lived tradition of hand coiling pottery at the age of 10 back in 1982, by his family and his love for nature.

              Kevin specializes in the hand coiled black/sienna Santa Clara pottery. He crafts traditional designs with wildlife scenery's on the exterior of the pottery. The first piece he ever made was a dinosaur, and then he sparked an interest in molding animal figurines. Kevin gathers his own clay from the sacred grounds within Santa Clara Pueblo. He hand mixes, coils, shapes, crafts, and fires his pottery the traditional way, outdoors. Kevin signs his pottery as: Kevin Naranjo, Santa Clara Pueblo.

Kevin is related to the following artists: Dolores Curran (aunt), Geri Naranjo (mother), and the late Ursulita Naranjo (grandmother).

Awards:

-1995 Santa Fe Indian Market 1st & 3rd

-1997 Santa Fe Indian Market 1st & 2nd

-1998 Santa Fe Indian Market 1st place

-1999 Santa Fe Indian Market 1st & 2nd Place

-1999 New Mexico State Fair 2nd Place

Publications:

-Pueblo Indian Pottery 750 Artist Biographies

-August 1996 Indian Trader Magazine

Check for work by this artist in our Santa Clara Pottery section!

Naranjo, Madeline and Garcia, Adrian (Santa Clara)

Madeline E. Naranjo and Adrian Garcia are full blooded Native American Indians. Madeline was born in 1971 and Adrian was born in 1973. They are both members of the Santa Clara-Tewa Pueblo. They were both taught the fundamentals of hand coiling traditional pottery using the methods of their ancient ancestors. They were also influenced by many of their family members to continue a long lived family tradition. Julie Gutierrez also had a big impact on their decision to become artisans. Madeline & Adrian have been working together as a team since 1989.

Madeline & Adrian specialize in hand coiling traditional Santa Clara, but adding their unique contemporary flare. They gather their clay from within the grounds of the Santa Clara Pueblo. They clean, mix, hand coil, shape, etch, polish, and fire their pottery, outdoors with horse manure. The designs they chose to create are those of nature scenes, because of the respect and the love they both have for the planet and all that it has to offer.

They are related to the following artists: Effie Garcia (mother) and Madeline Naranjo (grandmother). They sign their pottery as: Adrian Garcia & Madeline E. Naranjo, SCP.

Awards:

-1992 Santa Fe Indian Market 1st place

-1994 Santa Fe Indian Market 3rd place

-1995 Santa Fe Indian Market 3rd place

-1996 Santa Fe Indian Market 3rd place

-1997 Santa Fe Indian Market Honorable Mention

Publications:

-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

-Pueblo Indian Pottery 750 Artist Biographies 

 

Naranjo-Samaniego, Karen (Navajo)

Karen Naranjo-Samaniego is a full blooded Native American Indian. She was born into the Navajo Reservation in 1967. Karen began creating Santa Clara pottery at the age of 19. Karen attended Brigham Young University and decided to take a break from college for the summer and visit her father, Wilson Price, Jr., in Santa Fe, N.M. During her visit, she met Forrest Naranjo and fell madly in love with him and they eventually married. Bernice Suazo-Naranjo (ex mother-in-law) taught Karen & Forrest the fundamentals of working with clay. Continuing long lived traditions is extremely important to Karen. She stated “I practice my skills as a potter, because a part of myself goes into every piece of art which I create. Thus, I am adding to the long lived legacy of my ancestors.”

Karen gathers her clay from the Santa Clara Pueblo. She breaks the clumps of clay to a fine powder form and mixes clay with other natural pigments. Karen hand forms and hand polishes every piece she makes. She also fires her pottery the traditional way, outdoors. Mother Earth provides her with all the ingredients to allow her to make her own art. Karen signs her pottery as: Karen Naranjo Samaniego.

Publications:

-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

-Pueblo Indian Pottery 750 Artist Biographies

-Collections of Southwestern Pottery

Awards:

-New Mexico State Fair

-Santa Fe Indian Market

-Pueblo Grand, Phoenix, AZ

-Haskel Indian Market, Lawrence, KS  

 

Natseway, Thomas (Laguna)

Thomas G. Natseway is a full blooded Native American Indian. He was born on April 19, 1953 into the Laguna Pueblo. He was taught all the fundamentals of constructing handmade pottery using the ancient traditional hand coiling method by his relatives and his wife, Charmae from the Acoma Pueblo. He began his career as a journalist and while interviewing Charmae he fell in love and shortly after married her.

Thomas specializes in hand coiled and hand painted miniature pottery. he gathers all the raw clays and natural vegetation from within the Acoma and Laguna Pueblo. He breaks down the raw clumps into a fine powder from and hand mixes with water. Once the clay is mixed to a fine medium he begins rolling out the moist clay into snake like coils and begins building the desired forms. His pieces are so difficult to construct because a finger usually doesn’t fit inside the lip of the vessels. He hand paints each piece carefully and fires his pottery in a kiln. He signs his pottery as: Thomas Natseway. He is related to: Charmae Natseway (wife), and Peter & Betty Natseway (parents).

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

-Santa Fean Magazine 1999

-American Indian Art Magazine 1992

-Indian Market Magazine 1985, 1988, 1989, 1996

-SWAIA Quarterly 1982

Awards:

-1999 Santa Fe Indian Market 2nd Place

-1998 Santa Fe Indian Market 1st & 2nd Place

-1996 Santa Fe Indian Market (3) 2nd Place

-1995 Santa Fe Indian Market Best of Class

-1993 Santa Fe Indian Market 1st, 2nd, & 3rd Place

-1992 Santa Fe Indian Market 2nd & (2) 3rd Place

-1991 Santa Fe Indian Market (2) 1st & (2) 2nd Place

-1989 Santa Fe Indian Market 1st & (2) 2nd Place

 

Navasie, Charles (Hopi)

Charles Navasie is a full blooded Native American Indian, and he was born in  1965 into the Hopi-Tewa Reservation.  His a member of the Parrot Clan.  He began working with clay at the age of fifteen.  He was inspired by his grandmothers, the late, Pagua Naha, and the world renowned Joy Frogwoman Navasie, to continue the long lived family tradition of making pottery using ancient traditional methods. Frogwoman shared all the fundamentals of working with clay and encouraged Charles to continue the family tradition and add to the legacy of their ancestors.

Charles specializes in hand coiling and hand painting traditional seedjars, bowls, and vases.  He gathers his raw clay from within the hills of the Hopi Reservation. Next, he cleans the clay until it reaches a fine powder form.  Then, he mixes the powder with water.  Once the clay reaches a fine medium he begins the hand coiling process and begins the shaping of the vessel by using snake like coils.  When the shape of the vessel is determined he sets his product out to dry.  When his vessel is dried he will sand the piece by hand for a smooth finish.  Then he begins the hand painting process.  The colors used on his his pottery are all authentically hand mixed from natural vegetation which is also harvested from within the Hopi Reservation.  Once the vessel has been painted and set out to dry he will complete the process by giving the pottery a  traditional firing, the way of his ancestors, outdoors, using authentic sheep dung. Then, he adds a fine polish which he has mastered to perfection. He signs his  pottery as: Charles Navasie with a symbol of a frog to denote his family origin.

 

Publications:

-Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery

-Seven Families in Pueblo Pottery

-Hopi-Tewa Pottery 500 Artist Biographies

 

Navasie, Dawn (Hopi)

Dawn Navasie, “Polaquimana” (Red Tail Hawk), member of the Water Clan, was born into the Hopi-Tewa Reservation in 1961. She was inspired to continue the family tradition of pottery making from her extremely famous Mother, the late Eunice “Fawn” Navasie. Fawn taught Dawn all the fundamentals of making traditional Hopi pottery at the age of 4. Dawn would assist her mother with her pottery and thus inspired her to learn. Dawn began perfecting her pottery making skills at the age of 17.

Dawn specializes in handmade traditional Hopi style pottery. She prefers making the larger ollas (larger pots) because they have more room to paint her favorite designs of mythical rainbirds and rain clouds. She also paints moths, weather symbols, and elements of the earth. Natural minerals and vegetables like wild bee plant, hematite, and red clay are used for coloration. Firing is done in the traditional manner using sheep dung as fuel. Dawn is a superb artist in the Hopi-Tewa tradition. She paints with a sure hand and has a design vision that recalls the beauty and quality of her mother’s work (original Fawn). Dawn signs her pottery as: Dawn Navasie, followed by a water symbol to denote her clan origin.

Dolly Joe “White Swann” Navasie (sister), Eunice “Fawn” Navasie” (mother),

Darrell Navasie, and Gregory Navasie (brothers) and Fawn Garcia Navasie, sister, formerly “Little Fawn” are among some of the many other artists that Dawn is related to.

Awards:

-Gallup Ceremonial 1st Place

-Hopi Guild 1st Place

-Museum of Northern Arizona 1st

place

Publications:

-1996 Arizona Highways magazine

-Art of the Hopi

-Hopi-Tewa Pottery 500 Artist Biographies 

 

Navasie, Dolly Joe (Hopi)

Dolly Joe Navasie, “White Swann”, member of the water clan, was born in 1964 into the Hopi-Tewa Reservation. She is the daughter of the famous Eunice “Fawn” Navasie. White Swann was taught all the fundamentals of traditional pottery making at the age of 6, from her maternal Grandmother, Poli-Ini. The famous, late Eunice “Fawn” Navasie (mother), taught White Swann how to paint traditional designs at the age of 17.

White Swann specializes in the handmade traditional Hopi pottery. All of her pottery is made from Mother Earth.The pottery is coiled the traditional way and fired outdoors with sheep dung. She uses a yucca, in which she fashions into a paint brush, to paint her intricate designs. Iron oxide rock is used for the maroon coloration, whereas the yellow clay provides the orange finish. She uses a polishing stone to polish her pottery that was passed down to her from Poli-ini (grandmother). White Swann is a strong believer in continuing family traditions. She is proud of making pottery because it is the way of life that has been passed down to her from her ancestors. She currently is mentoring her children so that they can take part of a tradition in which she is proud to be a part of, and hope that they will continue this unique style of art which she holds dear to her heart. She signs her pottery as: White Swann, followed by a graceful swan symbol. 

White Swann was born into a gifted family of famous potters which includes: The late Eunice “Fawn” (mother), “Little Fawn” Navasie, Dawn Navasie  (sisters), Darrell Navasie, Greg Navasie (brothers), and The famous Joy “2nd Frogwoman” Navasie.

 Publications:

-Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery

-Art of the Hopi

-Hopi-Tewa Pottery 500 Artist Biographies

Awards:

-American Indian & Relic Show 1st

-Hopi Tu-tsootsvolla Sedona AZ 1st

-Pasadena Original American Indian

-Other too numerous to list

Navasie, Joy Frog Woman (Tewa /  Hopi)

Joy (originally Yellow Flower)“Frogwoman” Navasie, member of the Kachina Clan,  was born in 1919 into the Hopi/Tewa Reservation. She is the daughter of the famous Paqua (original Frogwoman) Naha, who was credited for originating the white slip elegant styled Hopi pottery. Paqua’s trademark was the frog symbol and it was passed down to Joy in 1939. Joy’s frog symbol has long webbed feet, while Paqua’s had short toes. Joy has been using her trademark since the age of 20. Joy is one of the most prolific and finest Hopi potters of today. She learned all the traditional methods of pottery making from her mother. Joy’s career as a potter began in 1935.

Joy specializes in traditional styled white slip Hopi pottery. All of the steps used to make her pottery are taught the traditional way, from gathering clay, cleaning, molding, coiling the pottery, slipping, polishing, painting, and finally the outdoor firing with sheep dung. Joy coils many shapes of pottery like: wedding vases, jars, and bowls. Joy taught her family members all of the knowledge that she acquired over the years, so that they may continue the tradition which her mother, Paqua, started back in 1935. Joy signs her pottery with a frog symbol.

Joy is related to many famous artist among them are: Burel Naha, Stetson Setalla, (nephews), Sylvia Naha, Fawn Navasie (nieces), Marianne Harrison, Loretta Navasie (daughters), and Charles Navasie (grandson).

Publications:

-Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery

-Art of the Hopi

-Southwest Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

-Hopi-Tewa Pottery 500 Artist Biographies

-Southwestern Pottery 1999 Edition

Joy has pottery displayed in several museums as well as private collections.

Navasie, Marianne (Hopi)

Marianne Navasie is the daughter of  famed Joy Navasie, and the grand-daughter of world renowned Paqua Naha, the original frog woman.  Marianne was born in 1951, and has been making pottery since she was 18 years old.  Although, Marianne was only three years old when her grandmother died, she does recall her and her mother always working with the clay.  Marianne has mastered the white ware look pioneered by Paqua, and carried on by her mother, and now Marianne is continuing with the family tradition.  Marianne stated, “ My Mother always pushed us to stay with traditional hand coiled pottery making methods, and to carry on the frog style.”  One look at Marianne’s pottery and it is evident that she has mastered the art which was created by her ancestors. She gathers all her materials (natural pigments) from within the Hopi Reservation. Marianne cleans, mixes, hand coils, shapes, sands, paints, and fires her pottery, outdoors, with sheep dung.

Marianne signs her pottery with the “Paqua”, (frog) symbol, but does put a tadpole next to it so it indicates her place within her family tree.  Marianne is left handed so her work will move in the opposite direction of her mother‘s.

Awards:

-Santa Fe Indian Market

-New Mexico State Fair

-Gallup Indian Ceremonial 1st place

-Scottsdale Hopi Show

-Flagstaff Hopi Show

Publications:

-Hopi-Tewa Pottery 500 Artist Biographies

-Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery

-Southwest Pottery for Anasazi to Zuni

-Collecting Southwestern Indian Arts and Crafts

-Cover of Gallup Ceremonial Brochure (1978)

 

Navasie- Garcia, Fawn (Hopi)

Fawn Navasie-Garcia, “formerly Litte Fawn”, was born in 1959 into the Hopi Reservation. She was inspired to continue the family tradition of making pottery by her late Mother, the famous “Eunice (original Fawn) Navasie.” Eunice taught her all the fundamentals of traditional Hopi pottery making. Early on, Fawn  specialized in the white slip pottery that her mother taught her to make, which according to Fawn is much more difficult to make. Fawn has been making pottery since 1979.

Fawn specializes in elegant polychrome buff or yellow slipped pottery. All of her materials are gathered within the Hopi Reservation, including the colors used on the pottery. She cleans the clay, mixes, hand-coils, shapes, sands, paints, and fires her pottery the traditional way, outdoors with sheep dung. Fawn coils a wide variety of shapes like wedding vases, egg shaped pots, and bowls. Her designs originate from the Sikyatki Ruins (yellow earth and it’s the name of a former village at the Hopi Reservation located two miles north of First Mesa). Fawn signs her pottery as: Fawn, followed by a fawn hoofprint.

Fawn is related to many prolific and famous artists among some of them are: Dawn Navasie, Dolly Joe Navasie (sisters), Stetson Setalla, Dee Setalla, Marianne Harrison, Burel Naha, Sylvia Naha (cousins), the late Eunice Navasie (mother), Helen Naha, Joy “Frogwoman” Navasie (aunts), and the late Paqua Naha (grandmother).

Awards:

-1999 New Mexico State Fair 4th Place

-Gallup Indian Ceremonial

-Santa Fe Indian Market

-Fountain Hills Arts & Crafts Show

Publications:

-Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery

Olivas, Gilbert (San Juan)

Gilbert Olivas was born in 1958 into the San Juan Pueblo. He began experimenting with clay at the age of 7. By the time he turned 29 years of age he had mastered all the fundamentals of using ancient traditional methods of working with natural clays and pigments. He was inspired to learn the art by working with Barbara Martinez from the Santa Clara Pueblo. She shared her special techniques of working with clay with Gilbert.

Gilbert specializes in the hand coiled black or red Santa Clara pottery. He mines his clay and other pigments from within the hills of the Santa Clara Pueblo. Then, he sifts the clay for impurities, mixes the clay with volcanic ash, hand coils, carves designs, polishes the pottery with a stone, and fires his pottery, outdoors, with horse manure. His designs include the water serpent (beginning of life), feathers (ablity to fly), and arrows (direction of life). He signs his pottery as: Olivas pottery, Gilbert Olivas, followed by the date when the pot was completed.

Awards:

-Los Alamos National Lab Art Show 1st Place

-New Mexico State Fair 2nd Place

Publications:

-Rancho de Chimayo Collections brochure

-New Mexico Geographical Society

-Guest Life Magazine

-Northern New Mexico Community College brochure

Ortiz, Norma Jean (Acoma)

Norma Jean Ortiz has lived at Acoma Pueblo for most of her life. She supports herself and her daughter by creating pottery in the way her Native American family has been for over 1,000 years. None of Norma Jean's designs are written down, they are all in her head and each piece is unique.

She mines the clay on the reservation, mixes it with old pottery fragments found in the hills and soaks this with rain water. The colors for the paint come from wild spinach and ground-up limestone. The making of the pots actually takes about 2 weeks or more. Norma Jean has sold her pottery to customers from as far away as Hawaii, Canada and Japan.

 

Pacheco, Paulita and Gilbert (Santo Domingo)

Paulita & Gilbert Pacheco are full blooded Native American Indians. Paulita is a member of the Fire Clan, born in 1943, and Gilbert is a member of the Corn Clan. Continuing traditional ways of life is very important to these fine artisans. Paulita was inspired to learn the art of working with clay from the late Juanita C. Tenorio (mother) and the late Andrea Ortiz (grandmother). As a child at the age of 12, Paulita assisted her elders with gathering natural pigments from the grounds within the Santo Domingo Pueblo. Eventually, she was taught how to hand coil and paint on pottery. She was also inspired by her brother, Robert Tenorio. Gilbert also learned the art of working with clay at a very young age. He also assisted his elders with their pottery.

Paulita & Gilbert specialize in hand coiled traditional Santo Domingo pottery. They continue using the pottery making methods of their ancient ancestors. The clay and other natural pigments are gathered within their pueblo. Then, the clay is cleaned, mixed, hand coiled, shaped, painted, and fired the traditional way, outdoors. This pair of fine artisans contribute equally with the process of making their fine art. They hand coil many shapes and sizes of quality pottery. Paulita & Gilbert are proud of continuing a long lived tradition and hope that the younger members of their Pueblo become inspired by them. They sign their pottery as: Paulita Pacheco & a corn symbol to denote Gilbert's Clan.

They are related to the famous Hilda Coriz and the late Arthur Coriz (sister & brother-in-law).

Awards:

-Eighth Northern Arts & Crafts Show

-Santa Fe Indian Market

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery

-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

-Southwestern Pottery 1999 Edition

 

Padilla, Andrew (Laguna/Santa Clara)

Andrew Padilla is a full blooded Native American Indian. He was born in 1956. He is half Laguna and half Santa Clara. He was inspired to learn the art of working with clay from his grandmother, Reycita Padilla. She was from the Santa Clara Pueblo and began teaching Andrew all the fundamentals of pottery making at the age of 10. Reycita taught him how to hand coil black on black traditional Santa Clara pottery. He continued making the Santa Clara pottery until 1982. When he moved to the Laguna Pueblo, he experimented with the white Laguna clay. He learned this process from his mother, Gladys Paquin. Gladys showed Andrew which mesa provided the best clay so he would only use the finest natural pigments to make his pottery. She also taught him all of her special techniques of working with clay. The clay is gathered in the early spring and the beginning of the fall. He cleans, mixes, hand coils, shapes, and fires his pottery the traditional way, outdoors. He hand coils many different shapes and sizes of pottery. He enjoys making the white melon vessels and on occasion accents a kiva step lid as the crown. Andrew has combined his Santa Clara and Laguna cultures to create this elegant contemporary style of art which he is credited with. He signs his pottery as: Andrew Padilla, Laguna, N.M.

Awards:

-1999 New Mexico State Fair 4th Place

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

-Collections of Southwestern Pottery

-Southwestern Pottery 1999 Edition

-Pueblo Indian Pottery 750 Artist Biographies

-Arts Focus Magazine May/June 1998 Edition

 

Panana, Reyes (Jemez)

Reyes Panama was born into the Jemez Pueblo in 1961. Her inspiration to be an artisan came from the admiration she developed while associating with several other artisans. She wanted to contribute artistically just like other relatives and friends which were artistically inclined. Reyes has been working with clay since the age of 24.

Reyes specializes in handmade koshare storytellers and koshare flute player clay sculptures. She learned the traditional methods of pottery making from many different sources. She found that she enjoyed making clay sculptures the best. The clay used for her sculptures is gathered within the hills of the Jemez Pueblo. She cleans the clay, mixes the clay with temper, forms it into a sculpture, sets it out to dry, sands her koshare sculpture, paints with natural colors using minerals and natural plant life which is also found within the Jemez Pueblo, and finally, fires her art the traditional way, outdoors with cedar chips. Reyes’ koshares are a unique work of art to admire, being that all is made from Mother Earth materials. She adds dried corn stalks for the hair to add a unique flare to her work. Reyes signs her pottery as: R. Panana, Jemez. Reyes is related to the following artists: Pauline Sarracino, Ralph Sarracino (aunt & uncle), and Matthew Panama (cousin).

Awards:

-1996 Santa Fe Indian Market 1st Place

-1997 Santa Fe Indian Market 2nd Place

-Eighth Northern Arts and Crafts Show 1st Place

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Storytellers and Other Figurative Pottery

 

Paquin, Gladys (Laguna)

Gladys “Sratyu’we” Paquin is a full blooded Native American Indian she was born in Rehoboth, New Mexico. Her father was from the Zuni Pueblo and her mother was from the Laguna Pueblo. Gladys developed an interest in the art of working with clay in June of 1980. She learned to construct this fine style of art by asking questions to other members of her family and friends. She gathered all this information and through trial, error, and much patience Gladys learned the complicated techniques involved in hand coiling traditional pottery.

                  Gladys specializes in hand coiled traditional vessels. She harvests her raw materials such as clumps of various types of clays and vegetation such as Rocky Mountain bee plant which provides the natural black color within the Laguna Pueblo. She breaks each clump of clay into a powder form and mixes water along with other natural pigments and begins rolling the moist clay into snake like coils and begins building a natural vessel. Once the vessel has been shaped she sets it out to dry, once it has dried she sands down all the roughness for a fine smooth texture. She boils all her colors from natural clays and vegetation and hand paints her designs. The designs are usually replications of old pottery shards found within her Pueblo. She is related to Andrew Padilla (son). She signs her pottery as: Gladys Sratyu’we Paquin, Laguna.

 

Awards:

-1995 Eitejorg Indian Market, Indiana  3rd Place

-1995 Eitejorg Indian Market, Indiana 2nd Place

-1993 Santa Fe Indian Market 1st Place

-1993 Santa Fe Indian Market Indian Art Fund Award

-1991 Twin Cities Indian Market, Minnesota 2nd Place

-1988 Okmulgee Indian Market, Oklahoma 3rd Place

-1987 Santa Fe Indian Market 2nd Place

-1986 Santa Fe Indian Market 1st Place

-1986 Santa Fe Indian Market Best of Division

-1984 Santa Monica Art Show, California 1st Place

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Talking With The Clay

-Lost and Found Traditions

-From This Earth

-Acoma and Laguna Pottery

-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

Permanent Displays:

-School of American Research, Santa Fe, New Mexico

-Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, Santa Fe, New Mexico

-Natural History Museum, Los Angeles, California

-Indian Pueblo Cultural Center, Albuquerque, New Mexico

-Cincinnati Art Museum, Ohio 

 

Pashano, Alton (Hopi)

Alton Pashano is a Hopi Kachina Carver. His incredible works often incorporate bright colors.  Alton is a master carver from Hopi 2nd Mesa. He is a member of the Corn Clan. He has been carving Hopi Katsina dolls for over 25 years. He carries on the proud tradition of Hopi Katsina Carvers.

 

Pasquale, Darin and Michelle (Acoma and Laguna)

Darin & Michelle Pasquale are full blooded Native American Indians. Darin was born in 1965 and belongs to the Pueblo of the Acoma and Michelle, born in 1969, belongs to the Pueblo of Laguna. They were inspired to craft pottery by their creativity and economic motivation. Michelle at a young age would enjoy watching her Aunt, Sally R. Garcia, hand coil her pottery.

They specialize in crafting the black and red etched ceramic pottery. Michelle paints on the colors and designs the etchings. Darin carves out the etchings on the pottery. They enjoy etching the hummingbird which represents femininity, and the bear, which represents strength and power.They sign their pottery as: D.M. PasqualeLaguna-Acoma, NM.

They are related to the following artists: Paul Lucario, Jr. (father), Art Lucario (uncle), Ray Lucario (cousin), and Sally Garcia (aunt).

Awards:

-New Mexico State Fair 1st place 1990, 1993,   and 1996

-New Mexico Doll and Ceramic Expo (2) 1st          place

-Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Mary Laura’s Calendar 

 

Patricio, Lillie (Acoma)

Lillie Patricio was born in 1970 into the Acoma Pueblo. She was inspired to continue the tradition of crafting pottery from her Father, Mike Patricio, Sr., and her Sister, Samdrea Patricio. She began experimenting with pottery in 1985 at the age of 15. Lillie observed her family construct their pottery and this sparked an interest in pottery making. She also was economically motivated to pursue the art of working with clay using ancient traditional methods.

Lillie specializes in hand coiled and hand painting on ceramic pottery. She paints her pottery  with very fineline starburst designs. She sections the pottery then paints on very fine line geometrical patterns and continues to repeat the pattern around the pottery. Lillie really enjoys painting the fine line starburst style. She also can paint animals and nature scenes freehand. Lillie signs her pottery as: Lillie Patricio,Pueblo of Acoma, followed by the year the pottery was made.

Lillie is related to the following artists: Mike Patricio (father), who makes traditional pottery. Mike Patricio, Jr. (brother) who paints lightning designs. Samdrea Patricio (sister) who also paints fine line designs like Lillie.

Awards:

-New Mexico State Fair

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

 

Patricio, Robert (Acoma)

Robert Patricio is a full blooded Native American Indian who was born into the Acoma Pueblo. He was given the Indian name of  “Bear” when he was born on June 10, 1976. He learned the traditional methods of hand coiling pottery when he was eight years old by observing his friends and relatives work on their pottery while living in the Acoma Pueblo. His family members taught him the long lived traditional methods of constructing beautiful clay art using the ancient methods of his ancestors.

He specializes in traditional hand coiled and hand painted pottery. He gathers his clays, slips, and natural vegetation to begin constructing his masterpieces. Robert cleans his own clay for impurities, hand mixes with water and begins constructing pottery vessels from snake like coils. Robert sets his vessels out to dry and once dried he sands his pottery for a smooth finish so that he can begin hand painting his designs. While his pottery is waiting to dry he boils all the natural vegetation together and creates his natural colors from natural plants such as spinach plant and various flowers. The designs on his pottery are re-created  from old ancient pottery sherds found within the Acoma Pueblo that his ancestors once painted  hundreds of years ago. His designs include geometric, fertility, tularosa swirls, and kiva step patterns. When the painting is complete he finishes his masterpieces by firing his pottery outdoors, the traditional way that he was taught. He signs his pottery as: R. Patricio, Acoma, NM.

Awards:

-New Mexico State Fair

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

 Check for work by this artist in our Acoma Pottery section!

Pecos-Sun Rhodes, Rose (Jemez)

Rose Pecos-Sun Rhodes is a Native American Indian that was born on May 23, 1956 into the the small but active Jemez Pueblo.   She learned the traditional methods of working with clay art form by observing and assisting her mother, Carol Pecos.  Rose has been hand sculpting clay art using ancient traditional methods since 1972.

              Rose has developed her own unique style of flawless hand sculpting designs of exquisite storytellers and figurines.  Her art form grabs the attention of viewers with the amount of exquisite detail her creative mind produces. Rose harvests all natural materials and paints which she gathers from within the  Jemez Pueblo.  Her storytellers are the Navajo women with flared skirts.  Her trademark is the little boy wearing a cowboy hat.  Rose signs her art as: Rose Pecos-Sun Rhodes of Jemez, followed by a sunface symbol.

Rose is also related to: Stephanie Pecos (sister),  Irwin Louis Pecos (brother), and Louisa Pecos (granddaughter).

Awards:

-1998 Santa Fe Indian Market 3rd Place

-1989 Santa Fe Indian Market 1st Place

-1990 Santa Fe Indian Market 1st Place

-1991 Santa Fe Indian Market 2nd & 3rd Place

-1992 Santa Fe Indian Market 1st Place

-1993 Santa Fe Indian Market 1st & 2nd Place

-1998 Santa Fe Indian Market 2nd Place

-1999 Santa Fe Indian Market 2nd Place

-2000 Santa Fe Indian Market 1st Place

-2001 Santa Fe Indian Market 2nd Place

Publications:

-Storytellers and Other Figurative Art

-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

-Miniature Arts of the Southwest

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies 

 

Peters, Franklin (Acoma)

Franklin Peters is an Acoma potter who was taught to make traditional, hand painted Acoma pottery by two of Acoma's most accomplished potters, Florence and Rachel Aragon.  At only 29 years old, he is well known for his parrot designs and is showing great potential.

Check for work by this artist in our Acoma Pottery section!

Pino, Erwin, (HopiAcoma/Laguna)

Erwin Pino, “Shro Dema” (Going Planting), was born in 1964. He is Hopi, Laguna, and Acoma. He began experimenting with wood carving at the age of 10. He was inspired to continue the art of wood carving by his friends, and relatives. When he was a young boy he observed his elders, with great admiration and enthusiam, carve their work.

Erwin specializes in hand carved Hopi kachina dolls. He uses a pocket knife to carve cottonwood root into highly detailed, and well painted dolls. Tradition is very important to Erwin, and by continuing the family tradition of carving it helps him become closer with the spirits. He is extremely respectful of the traditional ceremonies held within his clans, which involve the great spirits of the kachinas. Erwin does not plan ahead on what kind of kachina he will make. He works with the shape of the wood he is working on. Erwin just allows his imagination to create what comes naturally to him. Erwin signs his kachina dolls as: Erwin Pino, and he will include a title of the kachina.

Erwin is related to the following artists: Richard Dawakuku (uncle),Gary Heheya (uncle), the late Meldon Hayah (uncle), Melvin Pino (brother), and the late Benson Seeni (grandfather).

Awards:

-New Mexico State Fair

Publications:

-Culture & Cuisine Magazine 

 

Polacca, Delmar (Hopi)

(Delmar pictured with his sister Carla Nampeyo)

Delmar Polacca was born in 1959 the son of Tom Polacca, a renowned Hopi potter from the village of Polacca, on Hopi first mesa.   The Nampeyo-Polacca Family is now in it's fifth generation of potters and is listed in the book "Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery."

Delmar works in the same style that his father Tom created, that of deeply carved scenes of Hopi culture, his carvings are very precise and refined.  Delmar learned his techniques by watching his grandmother Fannie, his father Tom, his aunts, uncles and cousins.  He invented the marbling of Red and Light clay, which is a very difficult technique.  Delmar has only been making pottery since 1993 but has already won many awards at the Hopi Show, the Museum of Northern Arizona and the Mesa Verde Show and most recently the Zuni Art Show just to name a few.

Although a full time potter, Delmar still returns to First Mesa in the Hopi reservation over fifty miles distant, to gather rock deposits.  He paints with Wild Spanish juice.  He constructs his pots with handmade coils and fires them 2 to 4 hours using horse manure.  In the painting of the pots he expresses the history of the Hopi people.  Recently Delmar has won two best of show awards at the Zuni Indian art show and the southwest Indian art show Delmar has won many other awards through the years.

 

Polacca, Fannie L. (Hopi)

Fannie comes from an impressive family tree of potter’s; she is the daughter of Tom Polacca the Granddaughter of Fannie Nampeyo and Great-Granddaughter of Nampeyo.  She only makes hand coiled “Polychrome” pottery that was taught to her by her Grandmother Fannie Nampeyo and rediscovered by her famous Great-Grandmother Nampeyo.  She has won many awards for her work.

 

Polacca, Thomas (Hopi)

Tom Polacca was born in 1935 and is the grandson of Nampeyo, son of Fannie Polacca Nampeyo and brother of several well-known potters including Elva Tewaguna, Leah Nampeyo, Tonita Nampeyo and Iris Youvella Nampeyo.  He has been married to his wife Gertrude for over 47 years.

Tom is a self-taught potter who pioneered the deeply precise carved pottery.  Tom’s pottery is well known for their beautiful mural like scenes of Hopi religious ritual and ceremonies.  Thomas developed a very contemporary style with deep carvings depicting Kachina’s, the Anasazi and animals depicted by Kachina’s.  Tom’s pottery is often very large and unique in color and his work has been featured in many publications.  He has been the winner of several awards including 1st Place at both the New Mexico State Fair and the Gallup Inter-Tribal Ceremonial.

 

Quannie, Kevin (Hopi/Navajo)

Kevin Horace Quannie, member of the Water and Corn Clan, was born in 1960. He is a Hopi/Navajo contemporary artist and has been a carver of kachina sculptures since 1980. Living in Kykotsmovi, on the Hopi Reservation, Kevin’s occupation as a Tribal Ranger required long hours and with little pay. It was during this time while managing a small family Art Gallery, that he took an interest in Hopi art. Kachina doll carving became a serious occupation for him with much of his inspiration credited from notable kachina doll carvers such as Neil David, Sr., and Lowell Talashoma, Sr.

Kevin specializes in carving contemporary kachina dolls using cottonwood roots, whereby he takes artwork one step beyond traditional methods. Some of his artwork has been transformed into bronze sculptures, capturing all the beauty and textures of the natural grains from the original pieces done in cottonwood roots. Feathers originally woodburned one by one, glisten in gold and amber in his bronze sculptures. Kevin also paints on canvas and can make jewelry. He has received many awards and has established himself as a quality artist.

He believes that his choice to be an artist was a ethereal choice in expressing his inner feelings through his art. What continues to inspire and motivate Kevin as an artisan is that his creations, whether it is a sculptured kachina, a gold or silver jewelry, or an oil painting, that it will make collectors proud to add his art to their own collections.

 Awards:

-1992 Heard Museum Art Show 1st Place

-1982-Present Eighth Northern Pueblo Art Show

-1987-1988 Colorado Indian Market 1st & 2nd Place

-1990-1994 Santa Fe Indian Market

-Others too numerous to list 

 

Quintana, Mary (Cohhiti)

Mary E. Quintana-Baca“Parrot”, was born into the Pueblo de Cochiti in1946. She is a full blooded Native American Indian. Mary was inspired to continue the long lived tradition of working with clay from her mother. She taught Mary all the fundamentals of working with clay. She has been working with clay art since 1980. The lucrative aspect also provided Mary with incentive to become an artisan.

Mary specializes in handmade storytellers, clay sculptures, and nativity’s. Mary has developed her own unique style of clay art. She uses all traditional handmade methods to make her art, with the exception of her colors. She paints with brilliant shades of acrylic paint and add a lot of attention to detail on her masterpieces. Mary gathers her own clay and volcanic sand from within the hills that surround her home in the Cochiti Pueblo. She cleans, mixes, hand shapes, paints, and fires her pottery in a kiln. Mary signs her art as: Mary E. Quintana, Cochiti, N.M.

She is related to the following artists: Pablo Quintana (brother), Margaret Quintana (sister-in-law), Olivia Quintana (niece), and Pamela Quintana (niece).

Awards:

-New Mexico State Fair

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Storytellers and Other Figurative Pottery 

 

Quintana, Pablo (Cochiti)

Pablo B. Quintana, “Ke-Sto-We” (one who carries arrows), was born in 1947 into the Cochiti Pueblo. He was inspired to become an artist by admiring his aunt, Helen Cordero. Pablo observed her art with a keen eye and learned all her secrets to making her fascinating sculptures. Helen once made a figure of Santiago Quintana, who was Pablo’s great uncle that was envisioned as a great hunter, and this made Pablo want to be a part of traditional history. He learned all the fundamentals of making pottery sculptures at the age of 10. He was also inspired artistically to be able to express himself through his art. In High School he had an opportunity to attend a Prep School in New York City where he organized a one man show to allow the public to view his style of pencil drawings and acrylic paintings. It was a cultural shock for him being that he grew up in a small town. Living around the art which he was introduced to in New York City was also a great inspiration for him to continue his artistic endeavors.

Pablo specializes in hand-made micacious clay sculptures, which include storytellers, angels, and nativities. He gathers all of his materials (natural clays) from the grounds within the Cochiti and Picuris Pueblos. He cleans, mixes, shapes, sands, paints, and fires the traditional way, outdoors, provided the weather permits. Pablo said, “People say that it’s free to make my art, but it is not as easy as they say, it’s difficult work, and I am honored to have been gifted with such a talent.” Pablo can also paint on canvas, and he has turned some of his clay sculptures into bronze statues.  Pablo signs his pottery as: Pablo Quintana, Cochiti, NM. Pablo is related to the following artists: Liz Baca-Quintana (sister), Vangie Suina (niece), the famous Dena Suina (niece).

Awards:

-Santa Fe Indian Market 1st Place

-Gallup Ceremonial Honorable Award

-Highlands University most innovative sculpture

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Storytellers and Figurative Pottery

 

Ration, Bennie (Navajo)

Bennie Ration Is a Navajo Silversmith from central New Mexico. His distinct style of Indian Jewelry is recognized the world over. Bennie is considered by many as one of the greatest contemporary Indian jewelry silversmiths of our time. His Native American  Indian jewelry work is coveted by collectors and enthusiasts alike. 

Bennie Ration was born March 21, 1955, on the Canoncito Navajo reservation in New Mexico, to Frances and John Ration.  His father, who had been a silversmith since childhood, taught Bennie the art of silversmithing at the young age of eleven.  His father told him that no matter what else he did with his life he would always have silversmithing to fall back on.  Throughout his childhood, Bennie was a talented artist.  After he graduated from high school he enrolled in a one-year program at U.S. Silkscreen and Graphics School in Scottsdale, Arizona.  Upon completion of the course he worked for three years as a silk screener and graphic designer.  In 1978 he did fall back on the art of silversmithing.  With a look and style that he had developed as a graphic designer, he began making three-dimensional figures in silver.  His many wearable art designs include Kachina figures, Southwestern animals, feathers and Navajo inspired geometric patterns.  When asked how he comes up with his designs he says, “I remember what I see and make pieces in my mind.”

 

Ration, Benson (Navajo)

Benson Ration is a full blooded Native American who was born in 1953 into the Navajo Nation. He comes from a long line of silversmiths. His Father, John Benson, taught him all the fundamentals of silversmithing just like his father before him. Benson has been working with jewelry since the age of 13. He helped his father with his jewelry and watched with a careful eye so that someday he would be able to create his own style of jewelry.

Benson has developed a unique style of jewelry, which includes necklaces, bolo ties, and earrings. He fashions traditional kachina dancers from raw silver  with a coping saw. He draws all of his designs on the metal freehand, no stencils involved. The unique aspect of his jewelry is that you have several pieces within the necklace for example, you can remove certain parts of the necklace and it becomes a pendant, or it becomes either a lapel pin, or other pieces of jewelry, which you can fashion into whatever you would like to wear. Benson also paints with acrylics and oil paints. His trademark is the fancy kachinas which he constructs. Benson signs his jewelry as: B.R. followed by a hoof print to denote his clan origin.

Benson is related to the following artists: Bennie Ration (brother) and Nelson Morgan (brother-in-law).

Awards:

-1996 Eighth Northern Art Show 1st Place

 

Ray, Marilyn (Acoma)

Marilyn Ray is a full blooded Native American Indian. She is a member of the Yellow Corn Clan and born in 1954 into the Acoma Pueblo. She began experimenting with clay at the age of 12. Marilyn was inspired to learn the art of working with clay from observing her grandmother, the late Dolores S. Sanchez, work with her clay. She had mastered all the fundamentals by the age of 18 and has established herself as one of the finest Storyteller makers of our time. Her storytellers have been commented as being the largest, most complex and innovative styles.

Marilyn specializes in handmade sculptures like storytellers, small children, nativity’s, animals, and friendship bowls. She gathers her clay and other natural pigments from within the Acoma Pueblo. The clay and sand is prepared by drying, grinding, and sifting before it is mixed with water to produce the medium (weight of clay). The clay sculptures are then hand molded, air dried, and painted. Finally, they are fired outdoors, the traditional way, or fired in a kiln. The colors used on her sculptures are also provided from plants and minerals. Marilyn combines her skills in both traditional pottery making and figurative work. She signs her sculptures as: Marilyn Ray, Acoma, N.M. followed by a hand drawn lizard. She is related to: Rebecca Lucario, Judy Lewis, Diane Lewis, Carolyn Concho (sisters), Katherine Lewis (mother), and Sharon Bernard-Lewis (sister-in-law).

Awards:

-1980 New Mexico State Fair 1st Place

-1982 Santa Fe Indian Market 1st Place

-Eighth Northern Arts & Crafts Show 1st Place (several awards received)

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Storytellers and Other Figurative Pottery

-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

-The Pueblo Storyteller

-Southwestern Indian Pottery 1999 Edition 

 

Reano, Charlene (San Felipe)

Charlene Sanchez-Reano is a full blooded Native American Indian. She was born in 1960 into the Santo Felipe Pueblo.  She attended New Mexico Highlands University, where she majored in art. She was inspired to continue the long lived tradition of hand making jewelry from her clan members using ancient methods of constructing the fine jewelry.  Charlene married into the Santo Domingo Pueblo and thats where she honed her skills in traditional jewelry making the Santo Domingo style.

Santo Domingo jewelers have an incredible history of creating essentially the same type of jewelry perhaps for thousands of years.  She collaborates with her husband, Frank Reano and they specialize in authentic handmade jewelry but the methods used to construct their beautiful pieces are the same ones which were passed down by the Reano family.  While their beautiful pieces look very contemporary, the designs are combined with very ancient symbols.  Charlene & Franks creativity and hard work have warranted the title of prize winning artists.

Awards:

-2000 Santa Fe Indian Market 1st, 2nd, & 3rd Place

-2001 Santa Fe Indian Market 1st, 2nd & 3rd Place

-2005 Santa Fe Indian Market Best of Division

-2005 Santa Fe Indian Market 1st Place

Publications:

-American Indian Jewelry 1 1,200 Artist Biographies 

 

Reano, Joe and Angie (Santo Domingo)

Joe and Angie Reano are full blooded Native American Indians. They were born into the Santo Domingo Pueblo.  They were blessed with a natural talent to continue the long lived tradition of hand making jewelry from their ancestors using ancient methods of constructing the fine traditional jewelry. The lucrative aspect of the business also encouraged them to follow this path and become jewelry artisans.

Santo Domingo jewelers have an incredible history of creating essentially the same type of jewelry perhaps for thousands of years.  Joe collaborates with Angie Reano, together, this team specialize in a wide variety of handmade heishi necklaces and beautiful traditional earrings in which each bead is authentically handmade giving each piece an incredible feel. Their designs of the stone mosaic and shell earrings that they creates are beautiful, and while they appear very contemporary, the designs are very ancient. The learned all the fundamentals of working with raw nuggets of various stones at a very young age.  They are related to: Vicky Reano Tortalita & Rose Reano (sisters), Joe I. Reano & Clara lovato (parents).  The stamp their jewelry as JR or JLR over sterling silver.

Awards:

-1993 Santa Fe Indian Market 3rd Place

-1998 Santa Fe Indian Market 2nd Place

-1996 Santa Fe Indian Market 3rd Place

Publications:

-American Indian Jewelry 1 1,200 Artist Biographies 

 

Red Star, Norman (Sioux)

Norman Red Star, “Wi-Cahpe-Luza”, Swift Star, is a full blooded Native American Indian born into the Sioux Nation in 1955. He was inspired to continue the long lived tradition of crafting art by his Uncle, the famous, RedStarr. Norman began working with art at the age of 16. He started out with crafting bead work, and at the age of 24 he began hand carving sculptures on stone. At the age of 26 he began painting, and at the age of 40 he began crafting pottery.

Norman  now specializes in hand crafting the traditional Santa Clara pottery with sgraffito etchings. He gets his ideas from hunting and mother nature herself. He etches animal legends on his pottery. He also accents his pottery with turquoise stones. Norman was quoted as saying: “The finished pottery is always a welcomed sight to see.” Norman signs his pottery as: Wi-Cahpe-Luza, Red Star, followed by a shield symbol, and finally with his census number.

Awards:

-Alacia Bullock Ceremonial Best of Class

-Alacia Bullock Ceremonial Best of Class

Check for work by this artist in our Santa Clara Pottery section!

Rhoades, Stephanie, Snowflake Flower (Cochitti)

Stephanie C. Rhoades, “Snowflake Flower”, was born in 1931 into the Cochiti Pueblo. She was inspired to continue the family tradition of pottery making by her Grandmother, Estephanita Herrera, who also made clay sculptures and coiled pottery. She has been making traditional storytellers and sculptures since 1977.

Snowflake Flower specializes in handmade storytellers and clay sculptures made from Mother Earth. She digs up her own red clay and white sand from a sacred ground within the Cochiti Pueblo. She then combines the sand with the clay and hand shapes all of her sculptures. Immediately after this process the pottery is then left out to dry, where upon, she sands off the rough edges with sand paper. She uses a natural white slip paint made from the red clay. Wild spinach provides the black colored paint used on her pottery. She fires her pottery the traditional way, outdoors, with cedar wood chips and manure. Snowflake Flower signs her pottery as: Snowflake Flower, Cochiti NM, followed by the title of the figurine.

Snowflake Flower is related to the following artists: Mary Martin (cousin), and Ada Suina (sister).

Awards:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-1998 Southwest Indian Art Show 2nd place

Publications:

-Storytellers and Other Figurative Pottery

-Pueblo Stories & Storytellers

-Collections of Southwestern Pottery

-The Pueblo Storyteller

-Southwestern Pottery 1999 Edition

Riley, Beatrice (Jemez)

Beatrice Riley was born into the Jemez Pueblo in 1951. She is a full blooded Native American Indian. She was inspired to learn the art of pottery making, and continue the family tradition of working with clay, from several members of her clan. She was also economically motivated to continue the tradition. She has been working with clay since 1962.

Beatrice specializes in handmade pueblo style storytellers, nativity’s, ornaments, and friendship pots. She digs up her clay from a sacred ground within the Jemez Pueblo. Beatrice cleans, mixes, hand shapes, molds, paints, and fires her clay figures,the traditional way, outdoors. She uses all natural materials and natural paints on her pottery sculptures. Beatrice signs her pottery as: B. Loretto, Jemez.

Beatrice is related to the following artists: Angie Loretto-Riley, and Lucy Loretto (sisters)

Awards:

-None to date

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Storytellers and Other Figurative Pottery

 

Robertson-Navasie, Donna (Hopi)

Donna Navasie-Robertson, “Parrot Girl”, was born in 1972 into the Hopi-Tewa Reservation. Donna was inspired to continue the family tradition of pottery making by her Mother, Marianne Navasie. She is also the grand daughter to Joy “Frogwoman” Navasie. Marianne taught Donna all the fundamentals of pottery making the traditional Hopi way. Donna began experimenting with pottery at the age of 10 and by the time she was 16 years old she began taking her artistic abilities more serious. The lucrative aspect of the business also contributed to her becoming an artist.

Donna specializes in hand coiling the white slip Hopi pottery which her great grandmother is credited for originating. Donna gathers all of the materials used on her pottery from within the Hopi Reservation. She cleans the clay, mixes, hand coils, sands, paints, polishes, and fires her pottery outdoors, the traditional way with sheep dung. All the colors that she uses on the pottery are extracted from minerals and plant life which are produced from Mother Earth and found within the Hopi Reservation. Donna makes a wide variety of shapes and sizes. She strongly believes in continuing family traditions, not just because of what family she was born into, but because it’s a way of life for her people, and she is proud to be a part of it. Donna signs her pottery as: Frog symbol with a tadpole and adds her initials “D.R.”

Paqua Naha (great grandmother) and the late Eunice “Fawn” Navasie (aunt) are among some of the many prolific artists that Donna is related to.

Awards:

-Gallup Ceremonial 2nd Place

-1999 New Mexico State Fair 1st Place

Publications:

-Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery

-Hopi-Tewa Pottery 500 Artist Biographies

-Art of the Hopi  

Romero, Marie (Jemez)

Marie G. Romero, ”Drum Design”, member of the corn clan, was born into the Jemez Pueblo in 1927. She was inspired to continue the family tradition of pottery making by her Grandparents at the age of 8.

              Marie specializes in all aspects of pottery making; from storytellers to all shapes of pottery. She gathers her own clay from a sacred area within the Jemez Pueblo. Marie mixes, hand coils, shapes, paints, fires outdoors the traditional way, and uses natural colors to paint her pottery. Marie signs her pottery as Marie G. Romero, Jemez.     

Marie is related to the following artists: Laura Gachupin, Maxine Toya (daughters), Damian Toya, Camilla Toya, Gordan Foley, Benina Foley (grandchildren), Ponca Fragua, Bertha Gachupin (nieces), and Leonora G. Fragua (sister).

Awards:

-1999 Santa Fe Indian Market 3rd Place

-Eighth Northern Arts and Crafts Show

-Gallup Intertribal Arts and Crafts Show

-New Mexico State Fair

-Others too numerous to list

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

-Talking with the Clay

-American Indian Pottery 2nd Edition

 

Romero, Michael and Robin (Acoma)

Michael & Robin “Shy-Yai-Zta” Romero are full blooded Native Americans born into the Acoma Pueblo. Michael was born in 1964 and Robin was born in 1968. They were inspired to continue the family tradition of working with pottery from several members of their family and other artisans. Michael & Robin were also motivated by the lucrative aspect of the business to learn the art of pottery making. They both learned the process of using natural pigments to hand coil pottery in their early teenage years.

Michael & Robin specialize in producing hand etched pottery. With a simple sharp carving tool and a little imagination Michael & Robin construct some of the finest etchings. They paint the ceramic pottery with natural paints and etch very intricate patterns and designs of animals like hummingbirds, deer, elk, and wolves. They also etch carvings of traditional kachina dancers. They are related to the following artists: Deborah Aragon (sister), Gertrude Romero (mother-in-law), and Wilbert Aragon (brother). These fine artists sign their pottery as: M&R Romero, Acoma, N.M.

Awards:

-1997 New Mexico State Fair 1st Place

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist

 

Romero, Pauline (Jemez)

Pauline Romero is a full blooded Native American Indian from the Jemez Pueblo. Pauline has been hand coiling pottery for more than 15 years. Her mother, Persingula R. Tosa, taught Pauline all the fundamentals of making pottery the traditional way. Her mother also strongly encouraged her to continue the family tradition and assist with keeping the long lived tradition alive.

Pauline continues to use the traditional methods of pottery making, but has come a long way from the poster-paint days of the Jemez pottery. She gathers her clay from within the hills of the Jemez Pueblo. She also cleans, mixes, hand coils, shapes, paints, polishes, and fires her pottery the traditional way, outdoors. She has a unique method of adding a hand stone polish to a red or buff colored slip. The shapes are swirl bowls, wedding vases and various shaped pots. Pauline has also started to etch on her pottery, which add a very elegant contrast to the her polished work. She signs her pottery as: Pauline Romero, Jemez.

Pauline is related to the following artists: Marie Romero, Christine Tosa, and Maxine Toya

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

-Collections of Southwestern Pottery

Awards:

-Santa Fe Indian Market, 1st & 2nd 1993-1997

-New Mexico State Fair

 

Salazar, Angela (Santa Clara)

Angela Salazar is a fine young potter who was taught to pot by her mother, Frances Salazar. She and her sisters, Elaine Salazar and Yolanda Velarde, make good quality traditional Santa Clara pottery. In Gregory Schaaf's book on northern Pueblo pottery, Angela said, "It gives me a good feeling to know that people like the type of work I do."
 

Check for work by this artist in our Santa Clara Pottery section!

Salvador, Theresa (Acoma)

Theresa Garcia-Salvador was born in 1964 and is a member of the Red Corn Clan from the Acoma Pueblo. This highly talented artist uses traditional hand coiling techniques and paints with all natural pigments provided by the earth. She was taught at the age of 23 by her sister, Vivian Seymour. She specializes in water vessels and flat seed pots. She signs her pieces T. Sal.

Check for work by this artist in our Acoma Pottery section!

Samuel, Jerry (Navajo)

Jerry Samuel was born into the Navajo Nation in 1959. He began his interest in creating these unique dolls by watching his sister, Cheryl Yazza, craft her dolls in early 1998.

              Jerry handcrafts these beautiful one of a kind, Southwestern Indian porcelain dolls from scratch to finish, along with the help of his wife, Victoria Samuel, and his son Cooper Samuel. Jerry creates these unique dolls with enthusiasm and in anticipation of attracting all types of doll collectors. His dolls are designed with fox fur, bobcat, badger, or wolf pelts. The clothing resembles the clothes worn by Northern and Plains Indian Tribes. The facial design represent spirits of various Navajo Ceremonial Dieties, while the colors represents the clans of the Navajo. The attire also tell stories such as the fox head representing spirits of animals for hunting purposes. Jerry is of the Bitah’nii Clan. He obtained his artistic ability from his family who are also artisans. Jerry  proudly signs his dolls as: J-Samuel below the left ear.

 

Sanchez, Russell (San Ildelfonso)

Russell Sanchez is a full blooded Native American Indian born in July of 1966 into the San Ildefonso Pueblo. Pueblo children are seldom taught to make pottery, they learn by watching and experimenting with clay on their own. However, Russell was inspired and encouraged to learn the art of pottery making from his aunt, Rose Gonzales, as a young child at the age of twelve.  He was also inspired by another famous potter by the name of  Dora Tse-Pe’, who encouraged Russell to continue the long lived tradition of constructing vessels from nature’s gifts.  He observed her with a careful eye and eventually developed his own techniques and styles.  He eventually adopted techniques with the use of  inlayed turquoise and heishi beads.  He also was influenced by Jody Folwell, who introduced him into using different colors of clays and slips on the same vessels. 

Russell specializes in a wide variety of contemporary pottery such as: redware, blackware, micaceous, green clay jars, and figurines.  He is a definite outdoorsman and gets most of his inspiration from mother nature.  He enjoys hiking around the San Ildefonso Pueblo hills and deserts. 

Awards:

-1979 Best of Class Santa Fe Indian Market

-1981 Best of Division Santa Fe Indian Market

-1988 Non-Traditional Figures Santa Fe Indian Market

-1990 Non-Traditional 2nd Place Santa Fe Indian Market

-1992 Non-Traditional 1st Place Santa Fe Indian Market

-1994 Non-Traditional 1st Place Santa Fe Indian Market

-1998 Non-Traditional 1st Place Santa Fe Indian Market

-Several Others too numerous to list

Publications:

-Pueblo Indian Pottery 750 Artist Biographies

Sandia, Dory (Jemez)

Dory Sandia is a full blooded Native American Indian. He was born in 1968 into the Jemez Pueblo. He is a member of the Pumpkin Clan. He learned the traditional way of hand coiling pottery from his mother, Sharon Sarracino. Sharon taught Dory all the fundamentals of hand coiling pottery using the ancient traditional methods which were passed down to her from her ancestors before her. The lucrative aspect of the business played a key role in Dory’s decision to become an artist, and also to continue the long lived tradition of his people.

Dory specializes in hand coiled and hand painted contemporary two-toned, hand polished pottery bowls, plates, and wedding vases. Dory gathers his natural clays, and harvests his natural plants from within the Jemez Pueblo. He breaks down the clumps of clay into a fine powder and hand mixes the powder with sand to temper the clay. He begins the hand coiling process by rolling the clay into snake like coils and builds the vessels to his desired shape. He sets his pieces out to dry and when they are fully dried he sands them down for a smooth finish, then, the vessels are ready for painting and polishing. He hand paints flowers, kiva steps, geometric patterns, corn symbols, and sunfaces, which symbolizes prosperity. Finally, he fires his pottery in a kiln after he stone polishes the desired areas. Dory signs his pottery as: Dory Sandia/Jemez, N.M. He is related to: Johnny Sandia (father), Sharon Sarracino (mother), Margaret Sarracino (grandmother), Frank Sarracino (grandfather), Renee Sandia (sister), Adrian Sandia, and Ben Sandia (brothers).

Sandia, Geraldine (Jemez)

Geraldine F. Sandia is a full blooded Native American Indianand was born into the Jemez Pueblo in 1950. Geraldine began experimenting with clay at the age of 10. She was inspired to learn and continue the long lived tradition of working with clay from her mother, Cecilia Loretto. Cecilia taught Geraldine all the fundamentals and shared with her all the special techniques of a master pottery artist.

Geraldine specializes in handmade, hand painted two toned polychrome, stone polished traditional Jemez pottery. She gathers her clay from within the hills of the Jemez Pueblo. She breaks the clumps of clay down to a fine powder form and mixes with water and other natural pigments. Then, Geraldine begins forming the clay to the desired shape and size by the hand coiling method. Once the pot is dry she sands her formed pottery to the desired weight. She hand paints patterns of feathers and geometric designs among many other patterns. She fires her pottery outdoors, the traditional way of her ancestors. She signs her pottery as: G. Sandia, Jemez.

Check for work by this artist in our Jemez Pottery section!

Sandia, Kathleen Collateta (Hopi)

Kathleen Collateta Sandia is a Hopi Tewa potter. She is the daughter of Tom Collateta Sr. who is a Hopi kachina carver. She learned the art of pottery at age 16. Her grandmother, Sarah Collateta, taught her the intricacies of the ancient designs as well as how to paint them. Her pottery is hand coiled, made with natural clay and the paint is all from natural pigments. She and her husband Adrian Sandia have won numerous awards for their work. They live on the Jemez Pueblo with their three children. She signs her work K. Collateta, Hopi-Tewa.

Check for work by this artist in our Hopi Pottery section!

Sandia, Natalie (Jemez)

Natalie Sandia is the the daughter of award winning artist Geraldine Sandia. Natalie has been potting for over 15 years, and learned the craft by watching her mother. She uses all natural clays gathered from around the Jemez Pueblo to create her work. She signs her pieces N. Sandia, Jemez.

Check for work by this artist in our Jemez Pottery section!

Sando, Caroline (Jemez)

Caroline Sando, “Peacock Feathers”, is a full blooded Native American Indian. She was born in 1963 into the Jemez Pueblo. She was inspired to learn the art of pottery making by her Grandmother, Andrea Tsosie. Andrea taught Caroline all the fundamentals of working with clay and using ancient traditional methods. She began experimenting with pottery in 1971 at the age of 8. The lucrative aspect of the business also played a key roll in her becoming an artisan.

Caroline specializes in Jemez Pueblo style storytellers. She uses all natural clays and natural paints to hand make her storytellers. Caroline gathers her own clay from the sacred grounds within the Jemez Pueblo. Then, she cleans, mixes, shapes, paints and fires her pottery the traditional way, outdoors, with cedar wood chips. She accents her dolls with turquoise stones to give them more of a traditional look. Her favorite ones to make are 20” or taller, because she likes the challenge of adding more detail and more children. Caroline signs her pottery as: Caroline Sando, Jemez.

Caroline is related to the following artists: Irene Herrera (mother) and Andrea Tsosie (grandmother).

Awards:

-Santa Fe Indian Market

-Pueblo Grande Museum Show

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies 

Check for work by this artist in our Jemez Pottery section!

Sando, Kenny (Jemez)

Kenneth James Sando, “Christmas Deer”, was born in 1963 into the Jemez Pueblo. He was artistically inspired to become an artist by Gabriel Cajero and Don Chinina whom are his closest friends. They taught Kenny all the fundamentals of pottery making the traditional way.

Kenny mainly specializes in the finest authentic hand-made storytellers. However, he will hand-coil pottery from time to time. He gathers all his materials from within the Jemez Pueblo. He cleans, mixes, shapes, sands, paints, and fires his own work. According to Kenny, it’s a very long and difficult process. It takes him about a week of non-stop effort to construct one of his masterpieces from start to finish. Kenny also hand coils corn maidens, clowns, bears, and turtles. Kenny enjoys making his clay sculptures the best. He likes the challenge of designing his own style of art.

Kenny is related to Wilma Gachupin (sister), who also specializes in storytellers. Kenny signs his pottery as: K.J. Sando, Jemez.

 Awards:

-New Mexico State Fair 1st Place twice

-New Mexico State Fair 2nd Place

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Storytellers and Figurative Pottery 

 

Sarracino, Myron (Laguna)

Myron Sarracino, “Kaa Ooa Dinn Naa”, is a full blooded Native American Indian. He was born into the Laguna Pueblo in 1967. He began hand coiling pottery in 1984 at the age of 17.

Myron was inspired to continue the long lived tradition of hand coiling pottery by Verna Soloman (friend), Thelma and Sandy Sarracino, grandparents), and his friend and teacher, the famous, “Gladys Paquin”. She taught Myron all the fundamentals of traditional pottery making.

Myron specializes in hand coiled traditional pottery. Most of Myron’s designs originated from the Tularosa basin in southern New Mexico. These prehistoric swirl patterns along with various fine line work are his specialty. He duplicates ancient designs from old broken pottery shards found on ancient grounds. Myron uses all natural pigments to construct his high quality pottery. Myron signs his work as: Myron Sarracino, Laguna Pueblo.

Myron is also related to the following artists: Bertha Riley (aunt) and Stewart Riley, Jr.(cousin).

Awards:

-Eighth Northern Pueblo Indian

-1993 1st place Gallup Indian Ceremonials

-New Mexico State Fair (too many to list)

-Art and Craftsman Show

-Best in Traditional Pottery

-Others too numerous to list

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

-Collections of Southwestern Pottery 

 

Sarrancino, Sharon (Jemez-Laguna)

Sharon Sarracino was born in the early 1950’s. She is a full blooded Native American Indian. She is half Laguna and half Jemez. Sharon began her interest in pottery making when she was 18 years of age, in 1970. Ms. Sarracino was inspired to continue the family tradition of working with clay from her Grandmother, Petra Romero, who specialized in hand coiled pottery. Sharon specializes in hand coiling the contemporary designed handmade Jemez pottery. She gathers her materials from the grounds within the Jemez Pueblo.Sharon will normally construct a Butterfly Maiden, kachina, or a Corn Maiden kachina on the front of her pottery to add a unique touch to her art work. She has developed her own style on her art. She hand coils many shapes and sizes. Sharon signs her art as: S.Sarracino, Jemez. Sharon is related to the following artists: Florence Yepa, Genevieve Chinana (sisters), and Robert Sarracino (brother), who creates figures and carves stone sculptures. 

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

Awards:

-Best of show in Santa Monica

-New Mexico State Fair

-Others too numerous to list

Sharon has art displayed at the Hert Museum in Colorado Springs.

Scarborough, Mary (Santa Clara)

Mary Scarborough is an incredible Santa Clara Potter who specializes in traditional deep carved pottery. She was taught by her mother Barbarita Naranjo and her grandmother Nestora Silva. Mary's Traditional styled pottery is nothing short of spectacular.

 

Setalla, Dee (Hopi)

Dee J. Setalla is a member of the Hopi-Tewa Reservation. He was born and raised in Snowbird Canyon Arizona, and is a member of the Bear Clan. Dee began experimenting with pottery at the age of 6. Dee learned the art of pottery making from his Mother, Pauline Setalla, and his Aunt, Eunice, “ Fawn “, Navasie, both well known Hopi potters. They taught him all the fundamentals of pottery making the traditional way.

Dee specializes in handmade traditional Hopi pottery. He gathers all his materials from within the Hopi Reservation. Dee paints traditional designs of birds, moths, butterflies, bear claws, clouds, and rain on his pottery. Natural pigments found within the Hopi Reservation also provide the colors used on his pottery. Dee uses the walpi polychrome yellow and beige with blushes, characteristic of Hopi pottery. Dee signs his pottery as: D.S., Hopi, followed by a bear paw symbol to denote his Clan origin.

Stetson Setalla (brother), Joy “Frogwoman” Navasie (aunt), Burel Naha (cousin), and Sylvia “Featherwoman” (cousin) are among some of the famous artists that Dee is related to.

Publications:

-Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery

-Hopi-Tewa Pottery 500 Artist Biographies

Awards:

-Santa Fe Indian Market, 1st place

-New Mexico State Fair 

 

Setalla, Gwen (Hopi)

Gwen “Aas-Ku-Mana” (Mustard Juice Girl) Setalla was born into the Hopi Reservation in 1964. She is a member of the Bear Clan and a member of the Water Clan. Her mother, Pauline Setalla, shared with her the fundamentals of working with clay using ancient traditions. Gwen took an interest in working with clay at the age of 5. Pauline gave her a ball of clay to play with and Gwen would make bowls by pressing the clay against her elbows and knees. Pauline then shaped it and completed the process for her at that time. She gradually improved her skills as the years went by, learning how to shape, sand and polish the pottery. She also had to learn which hills provided the best materials to gather clay and other natural pigments. At the age of 16 she began to paint her own designs on her pottery and fire it on her own. According to Gwen, the whole process of working with the clay was a real challenge for her to do. At the age of 21 her desire to experiment with new techniques and different shapes of pottery developed. She began engraving and protruding figures on her pottery. She finds these techniques most enjoyable. However, they do requuire a lot of patience and a steady hand. When she is working with clay, Gwen is always reminded of what her parents taught her as a child. “When creating a pot, you bring it to life and you breath life into it, always treat it with the greatest respect.” She prays a silent prayer for every pot she creates and thanks all the great spirits for blessing her with this talent to continue a long lived legacy. She signs her pottery as: Aas-Ku-Mana, Hopi, followed by a Bear Paw to denote her Clan Origin. She also copyrights every piece she creates. Joy “Frogwoman Navasie (aunt), Eunice Navasie (aunt), Dee Setalla (brother), Charles Navasie (cousin), and Stetson Setalla (brother) are a few of the famous artists which share the same family line.

Awards:

-1999 New Mexico State Fair 1st Place

-1999 Heritage Program Marketplace 1st Place

-1999 Heritage Program Marketplace 2nd Place

-Others too numerous to list

Publications:

-Art of the Hopi

-Hopi-Tewa Pottery 500 Artist Biographies

-Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery

-Collections of Southwestern Pottery 

 

Setalla, Stetson (Hopi)

Stetson Setalla, member of the Bear Clan, was born into the Hopi-Tewa Reservation in 1962. He is the grandson of the famous “Paqua Naha” who paved the way for elegant white slip Hopi pottery. Stetson was inspired to continue the family tradition of pottery making from his Mother, Pauline Setalla. He began making pottery at the age of 19, immediately after he graduated from High School. In the beginning, it was just a hobby for him, yet it paved a path for him to become a superb artist. The lucrative aspect of the business was also his inspiration to become an artist. He also gets a sense of serenity, self-worth, pride, and inner peace within his soul while making his pottery.

Stetson demonstrates wonderful pottery making skills with each pottery in which he coils. All of his pottery is made from Mother Earth. The clay is dug up within the grounds of the Hopi Reservation and natural vegetables and minerals are used for colors. He fires his pottery outdoors with sheep dung. When Stetson works on his pottery he clears his mind of all bad thoughts by concentrating and praying to his clay. According to him a clear mind and a good heart are among the essentials to making pottery. Stetson signs his pottery as S. Setalla, followed by a rain cloud symbol.

Stetson is related to many well known potters which include: Eunice “Fawn” Navasie (aunt), Dee Setalla (brother), Sylvia Naha (cousin), Burel Naha (uncle), Gwen Setalla (sister), and the famous Joy “Frogwoman” Navasie.

Publications:

-Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery

-Hopi-Tewa Pottery 500 Artist Biographies

Check for work by this artist in our Hopi Pottery section!

Shields-Natseway, Charmae (Acoma)

Charmae Shields-Natseway is a full blooded Native American Indian, she is a member of the Yellow Corn Clan from the Acoma Pueblo. She was born in 1958 and has been working with clay art since 1977. She learned the art of working with clay from Dolores Sanchez, her grandmother, and Ethel Shields, her mother. They taught her all the fundamentals of constructing pottery using the ancient traditional method of hand coiling and pinching that has been passed down from generation to generation.

Charmae is noted for her superb quality of lidded pottery cylinders, boxes, and pyramids. She gathers her natural clays and slips from within the Acoma Pueblo. She breaks the clumps of clay down to a fine powder form and them mixes it with water and other natural pigments to a fine medium. Then, she begins to hand coil her vessels. When the raw formed vessels are dried she sands off the excess to give her vessels a smooth finish. She hand boils all her colors from natural plants and vegetation and begins to hand paint her designs. She signs her pottery as: Charmae Shields Natseway, Acoma, N.M., followed by a corn stalk to denote her family origin.

Publications:

-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery

Awards:

-Santa Fe Indian Market numerous years

-New Mexico State Fair numerous years

-Gallup N.M. Inter-Tribal Indian Ceremony

-Phoenix Heard Museum Show

Check for work by this artist in our Acoma Pottery section!

Singer, Tommy (Navajo)

Tommy has been a silversmith for over 28 years.   He learned the art of silversmithing from his father when he was just 7 years old. His Father Tsinnigine Hathali was a Navajo Medicine man. Tommy incorporates many traditional sandpainting and rug designs of the Navajo People into his jewelry. Tommy began creating jewelry full-time at the age of 21. His early works were done in the Silver overlay technique. His work soon began to feature Turquoise stones.   While working with scrap turquoise chips, Tommy pioneered the technique of Chip inlay used by thousands of artists to this day. For many years Tommy and his brothers created Jewelry using the Chip inlay style. In recent years, Tommy has returned to his roots by creating Exquisite Silver Overlaid Jewelry with intricate designs.  His current work often includes 14 Karat Gold Overlaid on Silver. Tommy also carves storyteller scenes with tremendous skill. His carved silver Bead necklaces are also highly sought after.

Click Here to See All Available Works by Tommy Singer

Small, Mary (Jemez)

Mary Small, “Kal-la-Tee”, (New Indian Basket), was born into the Jemez Pueblo in 1945 to Seriaco and Perfectita Toya, all members of the Sun Clan. Mary learned the art of traditional pottery making by assisting her mother. Mary was schooled in the “old way” of pottery making, and has mastered the art of processing clay from the earth, hand coiling and then the outdoor firing. Mary and her husband experimented with natural paints to come up with her unique blue/gray slip and burnt red/orange designs. Mary prays to her pots at each stage of the clay process. She was quoted as saying, “When my pottery is finished they are blessed, they have power.” She believes they will bring good luck to all who purchase her pottery. Mary feels that Native Americans have a special responsibility to protect the larger society from its own lack of harmony with nature, and the best way to help is to continue being faithful to their heritage. She is also afraid of changes that may dilute the traditional ways of her people.

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Southwest Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

-Santa Fe Visitor Guide 1998

Awards:

-Santa Fe Indian Market, 1st place 1981

-Fine Arts Enterprises Show at Mesa Verde Co

-Eight Northern Pueblo Indian Arts  show

-Heard Museum Shop Phoenix

-1999 Powwhatan Renape Nation Juried Indian Arts Festival 1st Place

-Others too numerous to list

Check for work by this artist in our Jemez Pottery section!

Starr, Red (Sioux)

Award winning artist Red Starr “Elk” is a full blooded Native American Indian born into the Sioux Nation in 1937. He was inspired to hand coil and craft pottery by Charles Blunt Horn (uncle), Norman Red Star (nephew), and Swift Bird (cousin).

Red Starr specializes in hand etching on the traditional black on black, Santa Clara pottery. He will etch animals, feathers, bear paws, and many other different designs. He accents his pottery with turquoise stones. He also hand carves sculptures on wood or stone, crafts belt buckles from bead work and he enjoys oil painting the most because he says: “I can get more creative and distinctive in my designs.” Red Starr signs his pottery as: Red Starr followed by an arrow, and includes his census # on every piece.

Check for work by this artist in our Santa Clara Pottery section!

Stevens, Sharon (Acoma)

Sharon “Butterfly or Turquoise” Stevens is a member of the Bear Clan. She was born into the Acoma Pueblo in 1960. Sharon was inspired to continue the long lived family tradition of making pottery from her grandmother, the late Lolita Garcia, and her mother, Rosita Stevens. Lolita and Rosita taught Sharon on the fundamentals of hand making traditional pottery, using the ancient methods of their ancestors. Sharon began experimenting with clay at the age of 15.

Sharon specializes in the hand coiled Acoma ollas. She gathers her clay and other natural pigments from within the grounds of the Acoma Pueblo. Then, she cleans the clay, mixes, hand coils, shapes, paints, and fires her pottery. She fashions a yucca stem into a brush and paints her pottery using the natural pigments she gathered along with her clay. Her favorite designs to paint are the turtleback (turtles are believed to bring you long life) and lizards designs (lizards are believed to bring good luck). She hand coils many shapes and sizes of pottery. Sharon likes working with the larger pottery because she can be more creative with designs. She signs her pottery as: S.L. Stevens, followed by a bear paw to denote her Clan origin.

Sharon is related to the following artists: Virginia Garcia (sister) and Manuel Stevens (brother).

Awards:

-None to date

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

Check for work by this artist in our Acoma Pottery section!

Suazo, Ron (Santa Clara)

Ron Suazo is a full- blooded Native American Indian from the Santa Clara Pueblo. Ron’s pottery style comes from watching his mother; who taught Ron how to coil, polish, and fire his pottery. Ron created his designs from studying ancient pueblo styles and early designs from generations prior. He visited several museums and looked intently at the pottery created by the Ancient Pueblo Indians, and was deeply impressed. Ron decided to create his own style, but to call upon his studies of early and ancient designs. Ron’s style has become one of unique black polish and matte finish with feather designs, bear paws, and other early styles. Ron will add stones to his work such as turquoise, coral, and malachite. From the day Ron sparked an interest in pottery making, he hoped that his work would be unique and stand apart from all the others. It is believed that Ron has accomplished his goal. Every one of his pots are copy righted,therefore, every one is an original design.

Awards:

-1993 Eighth Northern Pueblos Arts and Crafts Show

-1994 Eighth Northern Pueblos Arts & Crafts Show

-1995 Heard Museum Art Show in Phoenix AZ Honorable mention

-1999 New Mexico State Fair 1st Place

-1999 Santa Fe Indian Market 3rd Place

Publications:

-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

-Southwestern Pottery 1999 Edition

-Pueblo Indian Pottery 750 Artist Biographies

Check for work by this artist in our Santa Clara Pottery section!

Suazo-Tafoya, Emily (Santa Clara)

Emily Suazo-Tafoya is a full blooded Native American Indian born in 1959. She is Kiowa and Santa Clara. She was inspired to learn the art of pottery making from several family members, including her Grandmother, Clara Suazo. Emily has been making pottery since 1973.

                  Emily specializes in the handmade and handcrafted incised (sgrafitto) Santa Clara Pueblo pottery. Her pottery is made the traditional way and then completely covered with contemporary designs. Emily digs her clay from the local hills then combines it with volcanic ash found in the Espanola Valley of northern New Mexico. The pottery is carefully formed and a clay slip is applied in layers. The pottery is then polished to a high sheen. The firing techniques bring out the desired colors like black, red, or green. The pottery is then painstakingly etched. Every one of her pots has its own distinct personality, whether it be of the human or wildlife design. It’s important to Emily that she produces a clean and sharp image on every pot she makes. The result is a “sparkling pottery gem”, prized by collectors the world over. Emily stated that: “It is important to me to share my unique style of contemporary pottery. It is also important to stay within traditional methods of potting.” Emily signs her pottery as: Snow-Cap Mountains, Emily Tafoya, SCP.

Emily is related to the following artists: Jennifer Tafoya (daughter) and the late Ray Tafoya (husband).

Awards:

-1997 Gallup Ceremonial 2nd Place

-1998 New Mexico State Fair 2nd Place

-1999 Santa Fe Indian Market 1st Place

Publications:

-Southwestern Pottery 1999 Edition

-Pueblo Indian Pottery 750 Artist Biographies

Suina, Dena (Cochiti/San Felipe)

Dena Suina is a full blooded Native American Indian. She was born in 1961 into the San Felipe Pueblo. Dena married into the pueblo of Cochiti in the 1980’s. She sparked an interest in sculpting clay figures while observing her mother-in-law, Louise Suina, hand coil and hand paint her beautiful clay sculptures. Louise taught Dena all the fundamentals of how to hand coil all types of sculptures using traditional methods. Dena has been working with clay art since 1991.

Dena specializes in handmade and hand painted contemporary storytellers. Dena’s unique style of storytellers is of a traditional Cochiti storyteller, but with crisp detailed lines, very small children and exquisite painting. Her sculptures are all hand coiled, hand pinched, and hand painted. She makes a wide variety of sizes and adds very intricate detail to her clay sculptures. Dena has established herself as a fine artisan and continues to amaze collectors with her intricate efforts. She signs her pottery as: Dena M. Suina, Cochiti/San Felipe Pueblo, N.M.

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

-Storytellers and Other Figurative Pottery

Awards:

-1999 Santa Fe Indian Market 1st Place

-1999 New Mexico State Fair 4th Place

-Gallup Ceremonial 2nd place

-New Mexico State Fair 1st, 2nd and 3rd in

   various years

Suina, Vangie (Cochiti)

Vangie Suina is a full blooded Native American Indian, she was born in the mid-sixties into the Cochiti Pueblo. Louise Suina, who is her mother, taught her all the fundamentals of working with pottery artforms, from mixing the clay to hand building the dolls using the ancient traditional hand coiling method, which has been passed down through several generations of their people. Vangie has been working with clay art since the age of 22. She chose to become an artisan so that she could spend more time at home with her children, husband, and it allows her to contribute her unique style of art to the long lived legacy of her people.

Vangie specializes in contemporary storytellers, turtles, and drums. Vangie gathers her raw materials from within the Cochiti Pueblo. She soaks her clay and later mixes it with sand to temper it. When the clay reaches the perfect consistency it is hand formed into a storyteller figurine. Then, she sets her figures out to dry, the drying process is a very delicate state in the making. Vangie needs to keep checking her pieces so that they don’t crack and if they begin  cracking in the early stages she can easily repair and add more clay. Once the figures are dry she places them on a grill outdoors with manure cakes placed on top in an igloo fashion begins the baking process which lasts about 2 hours depending on the size of the figures. When the baking process is complete, she allows her pieces to cool down thoroughly and she begins to hand paint them. She like to paint her figures after the baking process because it allows her to decorate her art in vivid contemporary hues and thus gives her a unique style all her own. She signs her pottery as Vangie Suina, Cochiti.

Vangie is related to: Anthony Suina (husband), Dena Suina (sister-in-law), and Louise Suina (mother).

Awards:

-Santa Fe Indian Market

-New Mexico State Fair

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Southwest Art Magazine June 1983

-Santa fean Magazine August 1983

-Santa Fean Magazine December 1987

-The Pueblo Storyteller

Tafoya, Brenda (Jemez)

Brenda Tafoya has been making pottery since she was 10 years old, beginning with simple bowls and has refined her work to what it is today. She has developed her own style, which she refers to as "the melon cut style" using three different colors of slip. Her trademark is the kiva step, which you will find on both the designs for the pottery and in her signature. Her designs include serpents, hummingbirds, butterflies and owls with the melon cut.

Brenda shows her work at four art shows during the year. These include the Jemez Red Rocks Art Show - Memorial Day weekend, Eight Northern Arts & Crafts Show - 3rd weekend in July, Santa Fe Indian Market - 3rd weekend in August and the University of Tucson Art Show.

 

Tafoya, Eric (Santa Clara)

Eric Tafoya was born in 1969 into the Santa Clara-Tewa Pueblo. Eric sparked an interest in pottery making at the age of 18, while watching his Aunt, Gwen Tafoya, and his Mother, Wanda Tafoya, coil their pottery. This inspired him to start making his own pottery. The Tafoya family has been making pottery since the early 1900’s, and this strong tradition lives within Eric.

Eric specializes in the traditional hand coiled Santa Clara pottery with the classic black finish, usually etched or he will add sgraffito designs. Eric also adds the flare of a burned red brim and hughes to his work. Eric digs up his own clay and sand from within the Santa Clara Pueblo sacred grounds. Eric cleans the clay, mixes, hand coils, shapes, etches, and fires his pottery, outdoors, with horse manure. He etches flowers, hummingbirds, and designs of feathers on his pottery.

Awards:

-Eighth Northern Pueblos Exhibit

-New Mexico State Fair

-Tucson State Show

Publications:

-Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery

-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

-Pueblo Indian Pottery 750 Artist Biographies

Check for work by this artist in our Santa Clara Pottery section!

Tafoya, Gwen (Santa Clara)

Gwen Tafoya was born in 1965 into the Santa Clara Pueblo-Tewa. She began experimenting with pottery making at the age of 6. She started out hand coiling small bowls and pots, using traditional methods. Gwen began making larger pieces of pottery by the time she reached the age of 16, and eventually would etch on the pottery steadily. Gwen was inspired to make pottery by her mother, Mary Agnes Tafoya.

She taught Gwen all the fundamentals of hand coiling traditional Santa Clara Pottery.

Gwen specializes in hand coiling traditional Santa Clara pottery which she then carves and etches by hand. She gathers her natural pigments from within the hills of the Santa Clara Pueblo. Gwen cleans, mixes, hand coils, shapes, polishes, and fires her pottery outdoors with horse manure. She especially likes to make seed pots because she has more room to etch her favorite designs of hummingbirds or flowers on the top of the pottery. Gwen also has a special part in her heart for the wedding vase because of its meaning. Gwen signs her pottery as “Gwen Tafoya SCP”.

Gwen is related to the following artists: Angela Baca (aunt), Madeline Naranjo (aunt), Belen Tapia (aunt),Tina Garcia, Greg Garcia, Virgie Garcia, and Paul Speckled Rock (cousins).

Awards:

-1994 Gallup Best of show

-1995 Pasadena CA Best of show

-1995 & 1996 (2) 2nd place at Eighth Northern

Arts and Crafts

-1995 & 1996 1st place New Mexico State Fair

Publications:

-Pueblo Indian Pottery 750 Artist Biographies

 

Check for work by this artist in our Santa Clara Pottery section!

Tafoya, Helen (Jemez)

Helen Tafoya-Henderson is a native from “Walatowa”. Helen learned the art of working with the clay from her mother Vangie Tafoya, also well-known amongst the potters. Helen was taught at an early age, helping her mom clean and mix the clay. Soon she started to form her own pots, with some help from her mother.
Helen now is well-known for the Hummingirds that she puts on her pottery and completes her piece of pottery by putting a stone into the hummingbird’s eye. She uses either turquoise, mother of pearl, onyx or other stones. She is also a collector of hummingbirds herself and says the hummers have brought her luck. Helen’s great-grandmother was from San Ildefonso Pueblo and married into Jemez Pueblo.

Her work is featured in Gregory Schaaf's Southern Pueblo Pottery, Berger and Schiffer's Pueblo and Navajo Contemporary Pottery, plus in Native People's Magazine and Indian Market Magazine. She has won numerous awards at the Santa Fe Indian Market, New Mexico State Fair and the Inter-tribal Indian Ceremonial.
 

Check for work by this artist in our Jemez Pottery section!

Tafoya Naranjo, Madeline (Santa Clara)

Madeline Tafoya (1912-2002) was a noted Santa Clara. She was the cousin to Margaret Tafoya. In her lifetime, she won many awards from the Santa Fe Indian Market, and the prestigious Governors award. Madeline learned her trade from her Grandmother and her aunt. She specialized in traditional Santa Clara black and red pottery. When asked her favorite part of the work, she replied, "Creating each piece from the shapes in my mind." Madeline past away after a short illness in late December, 2002. She was 90 years old. She was preceded in death by her son, Thomas Tafoya; husband, Jose A. Tafoya; and great-granddaughter, Justine Tafoya. She is survived by her two daughters, Laura Pino and husband Eugene of San Ildefonso, and Leona Trujillo and husband Wilmer of Santa Clara Pueblo; eight grandchildren; and nine great-grandchildren. Madeline was a legend in Santa Clara Pueblo Pottery and will be surely missed.

 

Tafoya, Starr (Santa Clara)

Starr is the daughter of Henry and Jane Baca. She has been a potter for 22years. She has won FIRST, SECOND AND THIRD PLACE ribbons at the SANTA FE INDIAN MARKET AND The eight Northern Pueblos Show! Starr often works with her mother, Jane Baca, who taught her the trade. Together they sign their work "Jane and Starr, Santa Clara pueblo". Starr says that carving the pottery is her favorite part of her work. The Tafoya Family of Santa Clara Pueblo has been producing their famous Black wear pottery for generations. They use only natural Clays and slips found on the Reservation.

 

Tafoya Oyenque, Linda (Santa Clara)

Linda is the granddaughter of  Margaret Tafoya. Her father was  Lee Tafoya and her mother was Betty Tafoya. Both of her parents and Margaret Tafoya have past away.  Linda has won numerous awards at both Santa Fe Indian Market and the Eight Northern Pueblo Show. She has been featured in the book "Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery" and  "Pueblo Indian Pottery - 750 Artist Biographies" By Gregory Schaaf.

Check for work by this artist in our Santa Clara Pottery section!

Tafoya, Vangie (Jemez)

Vangie Tafoya was born in the small but active village of Jemez (Walatowa) located about 55 miles from Albuquerque, N.M. She is half San Idelfonso and half Jemez. Vangie comes from a long line of potters, originating with her Grandmother, Maria Sanchez Colaque, she is also related to Maria Martinez, the extremely famous potter known for her black on black pottery. Vangie credits her grandmother for her inspiration and moving spirit behind her desire, to continue the family tradition of pottery making.

Vangie has developed her own unique style of flawless freehand designs of exquisite hummingbirds, water serpents, flowers, and feathers. Her pottery grabs the attention of viewers, allowing them to experience her living art and unique designs. Vangie uses all natural materials and paints which she digs up from the sacred grounds within the Jemez Pueblo. Vangie signs her pottery as: Vangie Tafoya, Jemez, followed by a eagle feather as her own singular trademark, to denote her clan origin.

Vangie is also related to the following artists: Helen Henderson, and Brenda Tafoya (daughters).

Awards:

-1999 Santa Fe Indian Market 2nd Place

-New Mexico State Fair Best of Show

-Eighth Northern Indian Pueblo Art Show

  1st and 2nd place

-Santa Fe Market 3rd place

-Mescalero Art Show 3rd place

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-American Indian Pottery

-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

-Miniature Arts of the Southwest

Check for work by this artist in our Jemez Pottery section!

Tapia, Mae (Santa Clara)

Mae Tapia-Suazo was born in 1956 into the Pueblo of Santa Clara. Mae became interested in making pottery when she was about seven years old. Mae was inspired to make pottery by her Mother, Santanita Suazo. Her mother taught her all the fundamentals of pottery making and Mae continues the family tradition today.

Mae specializes in handmade contemporary red on black miniature pottery. She gathers all of her materials for making her pottery from within the grounds of the Santa Clara Pueblo. Mae cleans the clay, mixes, hand coils, shapes, designs the images, carves the images, and fires her pottery, outdoors, the traditional way. She makes a wide variety of sizes and shapes. Mae carves many designs on her pottery ranging from; kokopelli, rabbits, lizards, and hand coils animal sculptures. She signs her pottery as: Mae Tapia, Santa Clara. Mae is related to Shirley Duran, Margie Naranjo, and Candy Suazo (sisters).

Awards:

-Santa Fe Indian Market

-Eighth Northern Pueblos Exhibit 

 

Teller, Chris (Isleta)

Chris Teller, “Pe-ou” Misty, was born into the Isleta-Tewa Pueblo, in 1956. She began working with clay at the age of 17. Chris was inspired to carry on the tradition and continue making clay sculptures by her mother, the famous Stella Teller, who also makes storytellers and clay sculptures. Stella is featured in many publications and has won numerous awards.

Chris specializes in handmade storytellers, nativity's, and clay sculptures. She also learned the art of hand coiling pottery. She hand coils friendship pots, traditional pottery, and wedding vases using ancient methods. Chris gathers up her own clay within the Isleta Pueblo, sifts the clay, shapes, paints, and fires her pottery the traditional way, outdoors. Chris signs her pottery as: C. Teller, Isleta, N.M. Chris also judges pottery at the New Mexico State Fair annually.

Chris is related to the following artists: Stella Teller (mother), Mona Teller, Lynette Teller, and Robin Teller (sisters).

Awards:

-1989 New Mexico State Fair 1st place

-1995 Santa Fe Indian Market 1st place

-1996 New Mexico State Fair 2nd place

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Collections of Southwestern Pottery

-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

-Storytellers and Other Figurative Pottery

-Southwestern Pottery 1999 Edition 

 

Teller Velardez, Leslie (Isleta Pueblo)

Leslie Teller Velardez is from Isleta Pueblo. She is the granddaughter and student of Stella Teller. Leslies unique style of work is coveted by collectors worldwide. She has won awards and exhibited at the Santa Fe Indian Market and the Eight Northern Pueblos Arts & Crafts Show. Her work appears in Gregory Schaaf's Southern Pueblo Pottery; Southwest Pottery: Anasazi to Zuni by Hayes and Blom; and Berger & Schiffer's Pueblo and Navajo Contemporary Pottery.

 

Teller, Mona (Isleta)

Mona Teller, “Pa-Shawn-Thupa-Wa”, was born to the Pueblo of Isleta-Tewa in 1960. She began making clay sculptures at the age of 24. Mona was inspired to carry on the family tradition of making clay figures by the famous Stella Teller (mother) and Lynette Teller (sister), who are both well known for their contribution to the art world with their elaborate clay sculptures. Stella is featured in many publications and has won numerous awards.They taught Mona all the fundamentals of working with clay.

Mona continues to specialize in storytellers, nativity’s, animals, and small children at play, which she refers to as “moz kids”. Her pottery is made using natural pigments gathered from within the Isleta Pueblo. The sculptures are hand pinched, hand coiled, hand painted, and fired outdoors, the traditional way, with cow chips used for fuel. She signs her work as Mona Teller, Isleta, N.M.

Mona is related to the following artists: Chris Teller and Robin Teller (sisters). She also has 2 wonderful children, Christopher Teller (son) and Nicol Teller Blythe (daughter). Nicol is presently making her own sculptures from clay. Mona strongly believes in continuing traditional ways of her people. She has hopes that her children will continue the family tradition of making art from pottery just like her ancestors before her.

Awards:

-New Mexico State Fair

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

-Storytellers and Other Figurative Pottery

-Southwestern Pottery 1999 Edition 

 

Tenorio, Robert (Santo Domingo)

Robert Tenorio was born in 1950 into the Santo Domingo “Kewa” Pueblo. He has been working with clay since the age of 10. He was taught all the fundamentals of hand coiling pottery using ancient traditional methods from his family members. Lupe Tenorio shared some of her special techniques with Robert. He was also inspired to continue the long lived family tradition from the admiration he had for old pottery from his village.

Robert specializes in hand coiled traditional Santo Domingo pottery. He gathers his clay and other natural pigments from within the Santo Domingo Pueblo. Then, he soaks the clay, cleans, sifts, mixes, hand coils, shapes, sands, paints, and fires his pottery, outdoors, using cottonwood bark. The colors he uses to paint his pottery with are basically derived from  native plants also hand picked by Robert, which are boiled together to complete his masterpieces. He hand coils many shapes and sizes of pottery like water vessels, dough bowls, and traditional pots. Robert is continuously experimenting with different types of plants in hopes of making the special black color which was used on pottery several 100’s of years ago. He signs his pottery as: Robert Tenorio, followed by small dipper star formation, and Kewa. He is related to: Paulita Pacheco (sister), Gilbert Pacheco (brother-in-law), Hilda Coriz (sister), Ione Coriz (niece), and Juanita Tenorio (mother).

Awards:

-Santa Fe Indian Market 1st Place

-Eighth Northern Arts & Crafts Show 1st Place

-Eighth Northern Arts & Crafts Show 1st Place

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Talking With the Clay

-Collections of Southwestern Pottery

-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

-Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery

-American Indian Pottery 2nd Edition 

Check for work by this artist in our Pueblo Pottery section!

Tenorio, Thomas (Santo Domingo)

Thomas Tenorio, a full blooded Native American Indian, was given the Indian name of “U-Nah-Thee-Wah”  when he was born into the Pueblo of Santo Domingo in 1963. Thomas now has been making pottery for more than 9 years. Thomas felt that the ancient traditional methods of pottery making was dying within his Pueblo, so he was inspired to try and resurrect this long lived legacy. Thomas taught himself how to make traditional pottery by reading textbooks, conducting one on one interviews with other pottery makers, research, and by trial and error. Thomas now teaches classes on pottery making so that anyone wanting to learn the art of working with clay can do so and carry on a long lived tradition. He gathers all of his natural pigments from within the Santo Domingo Pueblo. He cleans, hand mixes, hand coils, shapes, and fires his pottery  outdoors, the traditional way, or he will fire his pottery in a kiln. Thomas has invented his own unique contemporary style. He adds a contemporary flare of cut-outs and new colors to the traditional Santo Domingo style. He makes a wide variety of shapes and sizes and he also paints birds and traditional designs with natural pigments found within his Pueblo. He signs his pottery as: Thomas Tenorio, Santo Domingo Pueblo.

Awards:

-1996 New Mexico State Fair 1st Place

-1997 New Mexico State Fair 2nd Place

-1998 New Mexico State Fair 1st Place

-1998 New Mexico State Fair 2nd Place

-1999 New Mexico State Fair 2nd Place

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Collections of Southwestern Pottery

 

Tenorio-Vallo, Marlene (Santa Ana)

Marlene Tenorio-Vallo was born in 1963 to the Pueblo of Santa Ana. She was inspired to hand craft ceramic pottery by her husband, Nathaniel Vallo. He taught her how to paint and etch her pottery. She has been etching intricate designs on pottery since 1988. The lucrative aspect of the business was also a great inspiration for Marlene to continue a long lived family tradition.

 Marlene specializes in the Acoma styled etched ceramic pottery, featuring Kokopelli (god of fertility), geometric designs, animals, dancers, and mimbres designs. She thoroughly enjoys using her imagination on her pottery. Her inspiration comes from Mother Nature and the circle of life. Marlene was quoted as saying: “The beauty of nature fills her heart and mind, then the thoughts becomes reality on my pottery.” Marlene signs her pottery as: M. Tenorio- Kokopelli  The “Flute” Player, Santa Ana, NM.

Marlene is related to the following artists: the late Ruth M. Tenorio (mother) and Lena Garcia.

Awards:

-New Mexico State Fair 2nd & 3rd

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Mary Laura’s calendars several years

 

Torivio, Dorothy (Acoma)

Dorothy Torivio was born in 1946 into the Acoma Pueblo. She is one of Acoma’s finest potters around today. She travels all over the U.S. demonstrating her skills. She has been making abstract designs on pottery since 1974. Dorothy would observe her Mother, Mary Valley, make pottery at a very young age. However, Dorothy was self taught and did not receive any direct instruction from her.

Dorothy specializes in Acoma hand coiled abstract pottery. She got the idea one day, back in 1982, to paint a design and repeat it over and over again on the shape of the pot. Dorothy basically combines the traditional pottery with her own penchant for the kinetic image, and thus creates an eye catching swirl design that contains both radiating and spiral motion. She uses a chewed yucca stalk that she fashions into a brush to paint with. Dorothy breaks off only what she needs so that the plant is not damaged and since it comes from Mother earth, it’s free. Dorothy says “I love the travel and expressing myself about my pottery, it creates inspiration for the younger artists out there.” Among the many relatives Sandra Victorino (neice) is one following her footsteps.

Awards:

-New Mexico State Fair 1999  2nd and various years

-Heard Museum Show

-Santa Fe Indian Market

-Eighth Northern Arts and Crafts Show

-Others too numerous to list

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Art of Clay by Lee Cohen

-Talking With The Clay by Stephen Trimble

-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi by Hayes/Blom

-Beyond Tradition by Lois Essary Jacka

-Field Guide to Southwest Indian Arts & Crafts

-Southwestern Pottery 1999 Edition

Heard Museum Permanent Art Collection

Albuquerque International Airport Collection

Check for work by this artist in our Acoma Pottery section!

Tosa, Bertina (Jemez)

Bertina Tosa “Ice Line” was named after her grandmother. She is a full blooded Native American Indian born in 1960 into the Jemez Pueblo. She was inspired to continue the long lived tradition of hand coiling pottery from her mother, Mary S. Toya. Mary taught Bertina all the fundamentals of making pottery the traditional way. Bertina began experimenting with pottery making at the age of 13. She didn’t seriously pursue pottery making until she graduated from High School. Then, the lucrative aspect of the business played a key roll in her pursuing a career as an artist.

Bertina specializes in hand coiled traditional pottery. She gathers her clay and other natural pigments from the hills within the Jemez Pueblo. She cleans, mixes, hand coils, shapes, paints, and fires her pottery the traditional way, outdoors, with cedar wood chips. She hand paints her designs with the natural pigments that she collects within her Pueblo. She hand coils bowls, wedding vases, and on occasion, she constructs storytellers. She signs her pottery as: B. Tosa, Jemez.

Bertina is related to many famous pottery artists among them are: Elizabeth Medina (sister) and Marcellus Medina (brother-in-law).

 Check for work by this artist in our Jemez Pottery section!

Tosa, Christine (Jemez)

Christine R. Tosa was born in 1950 into the Jemez Pueblo. She was inspired to learn the art of pottery making from her Mother-in-Law, the late Persingula Tosa. Christine began experimenting with pottery making at the age of 12. She learned all the fundamentals of pottery making, and began hand coiling small bowls and worked her way up to larger pottery.

Christine specializes in handmade Jemez Pueblo, polished pottery. All of her pottery comes from Mother Earth, from start to finish. She digs up her own clay, mixes, shapes, paints and fires her pottery, the traditional way, outdoors. She paints birds, serpents, feathers, and other traditional designs on her pottery. Christine can make all shapes and sizes of pottery. She said “I always start out making bowls, and before I know it, I have a wedding vase.” Wedding vases are extremely challenging to make and she welcomes the challenge. Christine signs her pottery as: C. Tosa, Jemez, Walatowa.

Christine is related to the following artists: Maxine Andrew (daughter), Jennifer Andrew (daughter), and Anasita Chinana.

 Check for work by this artist in our Jemez Pottery section!

Toya, Benjamin and Geraldine (Jemez)

Benjamin & Geraldine “Laguna Flower” Toya are full blooded Native American Indians born into the Jemez Pueblo. Benjamin is a member of the Acorn Clan, and Geraldine is a member of the Coyote Clan. Benjamin was born in 1964 and Geraldine was born in 1966. They learned the art of pottery making at a very young age, but didn’t take a serious interest in pottery making until 1985. They were inspired by Margaret Sarracino (grandmother) and Pauline Sarracino (mother).

Benjamin & Geraldine specialize in hand-coiled pottery which they decorate very ornately with corn stalks and intricate blossom patterns. Their clay is gathered from within the Jemez Pueblo. It is cleaned, mixed, hand-coiled, shaped, sanded, hand-painted, and fired outdoors, the traditional way, with cedar wood chips. They coil various shapes and sizes of wedding vases and pots. The colors used on the pottery are derived by pigments from Mother Earth. They enjoy working on the larger pottery because they can add more detail on their pottery. They are related to Reyes Panana (cousin) who is known for making koshare clay sculptures and the late Louisa Panana (great grandmother). They sign their pottery as: B.G. Toya, Jemez, N.M.

Awards:

-1999 New Mexico State Fair 1st Place

-1998 New Mexico State Fair 1st place

-1998 New Mexico State Fair Best of Show

-1998 New Mexico State Fair Best of Pottery

 

Toya, Camilla (Jemez)

Camilla “Mia” Toya, member of the Corn Clan is a full blooded Native American Indian. She was born in 1974 and was given the Indian name of Rainbow Basket. Mia was inspired to continue the long lived tradition of working with clay from many members of her family who are well known artisans. They taught Mia where to gather the best clays and other natural pigments, and construct her pottery using the ancient hand coiling methods of her ancestors. Mia began working with clay at the age of 14 and continues to add her unique style of art to this day.

Mia specializes in contemporary styled hand coiled melon swirl pottery with butterfly lids. She gathers her clay from within the grounds of the Jemez Pueblo. She grinds the clay, hand cleans the clay, hand mixes the clay, hand coils, shapes, cuts the lid portion of the pot while it is still damp. She sands each melon pot individually to get the roundness of the swirl in proportion with each other. Then, she hand shapes her butterflies and hand paints them using natural colors. Once her pottery dries she fires her pottery, outdoors. Mia stated; “I love butterflies and have a strong passion for creating my own style of art.” She signs her pottery as: Camilla Toya, Jemez Pueblo. She is related to the following artists: Maxine Toya (mother), Damian Toya (brother), Marie Romero (grandmother), Laura Gachupin (aunt), and Gordon Foley (cousin).

Awards:

-1999 Santa Fe Indian Market 2nd Place

-1998 Santa Fe Indian Market 2nd Place

-1993 Santa Fe Indian Market Young Potters Award

 

 

Toya, Damian (Jemez)

Damian Toya is a full blooded Native American Indian, born into the Pueblo of the Jemez in 1971. Damian is the son of Maxine Toya, who is currently one of the finest Jemez potters of our time. Maxine was the inspiration behind his interest in learning the art of working with clay. He is also related to: Laura Gachupin (Aunt), Marie G. Romero (Grandmother), the late Persingula M. Gachupin (Great Grandmother), and his sister Camille Toya. Damian is a member of the Corn Clan. Damian has been making pottery since the age of 5.

 Damian specializes in handmade Melon Swirl Pots. He gathers his materials (natural pigments) for his masterpieces from the grounds within the Jemez Pueblo. He cleans, mixes, hand coils, shapes, sands, fires outdoors, and polishes his own pottery. He was quoted as saying “All the pots that I create are my favorite, because each one is a part of me.” He signs is art as: Damian Toya, Jemez, followed by the corn sign to denote his clan origin.

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Storytellers and Other Figurative Pottery

-Southwestern Pottery 1999 Edition

Awards:

-New Mexico State Fair

-Santa Fe Indian Market

-Various out of State shows

-Eighth Northern Art Show

Check for work by this artist in our Jemez Pottery section!

Toya, Marie (Jemez)

Marie Toya is from the Jemez Pueblo. She is the daughter of Casimiro and Mary E. Toua. She makes all of her storytellers from all natural materials she collects from the Pueblo. She says her favorite time is when she is making each piece, "It makes me think of what to give each child and what the Grandfather or Grandmother is telling them. Marie has 20 years of experience and has been featured in the book "Pueblo and Navajo Contemporary Pottery"  By Guy Berger and Nancy Schiffer.

Check for work by this artist in our Jemez Pottery section!

Toya, Maxine (Jemez)

Maxine R. Toya “New Snow” is a full blooded Native American Indian. She was born in 1948 into the Jemez Pueblo. She is a member of the Corn Clan. Maxine began drawing and painting at the age of 5. She began working with clay in 1971. Her mother, Marie Romero, along with other family members, encouraged and inspired her to learn the art of the long lived tradition of working with clay, using ancient methods in the process. Maxine is also a school teacher by profession. She enjoys teaching the traditions passed down to her from her ancestors to the younger generations so that the legacy of her people will be continued for centuries to come.

Maxine specializes in hand coiled clay sculptures of various contemporary pueblo people images. She gathers her clay from within the hills of the Jemez Pueblo. Then, she soaks the clay, sifts for impurities, hand mixes, hand coils, hand shapes, sands the clay, hand paints using natural pigments to make the colors, fires the sculptures outdoors, with cedar chips, and stone polishes the final product. Every piece of art she creates is symbolic and unique in her eyes. She strives to achieve simplicity and elegance in her sculptures. She signs her sculptures as: Maxine Toya, Jemez, followed by the corn symbol to denote her Clan Origin. She is related to: Damian Toya (son), Camilla Toya (daughter), Laura Gachupin (sister), Gordon Foley (nephew), Bertha Gachupin (cousin), Virginia Fragua (niece), Persingula Gachupin (grandmother), and Juan B. Gachupin (great grandfather). 

Awards:

-1999 Santa Fe Indian Market (2) 1st Place

-1999 Santa Fe Indian Market (2) 3rd Place

-New Mexico State Fair various years consecutively since 1974 1st, 2nd, & 3rd Place

-Eighth Northern Arts & Crafts Show various years consecutively since 1974 1st, 2nd & 3rd Place

-Santa Fe Indian Market Best of Division in 1974

-Santa Fe Indian Market several years consecutively 1st, 2nd, & 3rd Place various years

-Many others too numerous to list

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Talking with the Clay

-American Indian Pottery 2nd Edition

-The Pueblo Storyteller

-Storytellers & Other Figurative Pottery

-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

-Southwestern Indian Pottery 1999 Edition 

Check for work by this artist in our Jemez Pottery section!

Toya, Vernida (Jemez)

Vernida Toya is from the Jemez Pueblo. She is the daughter of famous potter Judy Toya and the sister of potter Anite Toya. Vernida creates storytellers that are very unique to her own sense of style. In keeping with the traditions of those who first taught Vernida her skills, she uses all natural materials from her Pueblo when making her storytellers. 

 

Tsethlikai, Brian and Nashboo, Yvonne (Zuni)

Brian Tsethlikai & Yvonne Nashboo are full blooded Native American Indians, both were born into the Zuni Pueblo. Brian, member of the Parrot Clan, was born in 1978, and Yvonne, member of the Eagle Clan, was born in 1975. They were inspired to learn the art of hand coiling pottery from Phil Hughte, who was one of their instructors in school. Yvonne also learned the art of pottery making from her sister, Tammy Bellson. Handmade pottery is a dying art within the Zuni Pueblo and Brian, along with Yvonne (girlfriend), have teamed up to carry on a long lived tradition. They have been making pottery continuously since 1995.

They specialize in handmade Zuni pottery. They gather raw materials from within the Zuni Pueblo and create a very unique style of pottery. They clean the materials for imperfections, mix the clay, hand coil, shape, sand, paint, polish, and fire their pottery the traditional way, outdoors, with sheep dung. They hand coil a wide variety of shapes and sizes of pottery, and on occasion they will construct a lid to cover the pottery and accent it with a whimsical lizard. Brian & Yvonne chose the lizard pottery because it is believed to bring good luck. They sign their pottery as: B.T./Y.N., Zuni.

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies 

Check for work by this artist in our Pueblo Pottery section!

Tsosie, Leonard (Jemez)

Leonard Tsosie “Corn Hill” was born in the late 1940’s into the Jemez Pueblo. Leonard was inspired to continue a long lived tradition by observing his wife, Emily Fragua-Tsosie. She is known for hand coiling storytellers and corn maidens. Leonard has been working with clay since the age of 11. However, he didn’t spark an interest in working with clay until he noticed how dedicated his wife was to her art.

Leonard specializes in natural hand molded and hand painted figurines and story tellers. He gathers up his clay from the sacred grounds within the Jemez Pueblo. Leonard cleans the clay, mixes, shapes his pottery, fires the clay, and sand dries the pottery to a nice smoothness, paints with all natural colors and fires it one final time. He enjoys making his horses best of all. He signs his pottery master pieces as: L. Tsosie-Corn-Hill, Jemez.

Leonard is related to the following artists: Joanne Toribio and Irene Hererra (sisters).

Awards:

-1997 Eighth Northern 1st and 2nd place

-1997 Santa Fe Indian Market 2nd place

-1996 Eighth Northern 3rd place

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Pueblo Storytellers

-Pueblo Family Potters 

 

Tune, David (Navajo) 

David Tune is an authentic Native American Indian.  He is a member of the Creek and Navajo Tribes.  David began his professional career as a jewelry craftsman in 1976, when he was commissioned to design a jewelry ensemble for the National March of Dimes Poster Child and Past President Ford Senate, from this inspiration he decided to allow his creativity to flow and has created and constructed some of the finest masterpieces of authentic Native American Indian jewelry with a contemporary flare.  He was forced to resign himself from his art due to a difficult battle with cancer in 1987, but he was cured of his cancer with assistance from his Uncle and with pride and self-determination he returned to his passion of hand crafting beautiful masterpieces of fine jewelry. 

The work of David Tune is very distinctive and easily recognizable.  He works primarily with sterling silver and gold and uses authentic multi-colored coral, turquoise, lapis, sugelite, mother of pearl stones, and other various materials which each symbolize the six directions in life  in combination with his dramatic stamp work.  His colorful and innovative inlays in his jewelry are inspired by the aerial views o the earth that he sees from hot air ballooning and skydiving hobbies.  His creations include rings, necklaces, bolos, bracelets, earrings, and concho belts.  Every piece that is created by David symbolizes special spiritual meaning.  David stamps each of his pieces with a symbol of a sun surrounded by a circle.

Awards:

-1983 Inter-Tribal Indian Ceremonial Gallup, NM

-1985 Best of Show Red Earth Oklahoma, OK

-1985 Best of Show Art Show Boulder, CO

-1995 Best of Show New Mexico State Fair

-1997 1st Place Indian Art Show Lawrence, KS

-1986 Inter-Tribal Indian Ceremonial Gallup, NM

-1999 Best of Show Tulsa OK Art Show

Publications:

-American Indian Jewelry I 1,200 Artist Biographies 

Check for work by this artist in our Jewelry section!

Vail Family (Navajo)

The Vail Family is well known for their contemporary style of pottery known as “horse hair”. Tom Vail married into the Navajo Nation. He, along with his children William “Skeeter” Vail, Loveitha Vail-Sanchez, and their spouses Geraldine Vail and Ray Sanchez produce this style of pottery. Tom was born in 1933. Skeeter was born in 1961, his wife, Gerie, was born in 1960, and Loveitha was born in 1967.

They pour a ceramic white slip substance into a mold and it foms itself into whatever shape of pot that they decide on making. Then, they pour out the excess slip and let it set to dry. The ceramicware is then cleaned and polished. They heat up the ceramicware in a kiln and then randomly toss authentic hair taken from the mane (thin lines) or the tail (thick lines) of a horse on the heated pottery. The resulting carbon being drawn into the surface of the pot creates the wonderful designs and patterns. Finally, they clean the finished pottery with a dry material and the finished product is a unique marblized flare styled pot. This process of art is very hazardous and time consuming. When asked why they do this they all agreed and replied “We enjoy not knowing what designs will form on the pot itself after the horse hair has burned into the pot.” They sign their pottery as: Skeeter & Gerie Vail, Vail, and Loveitha Vail-Sanchez. 

Check for work by this artist in our Horsehair Pottery section!

Vallo, Adrian (Acoma)

Adrian Vallo was born to the Pueblo of the Acoma in 1964. He began his interest in pottery making when he was 20 years old, back in 1985. Mr. Vallo was inspired to make  hand coiled pottery by his Grandmother, the late Santana Cerno, who taught Adrian to coil, shape, paint, and fire pottery.

Adrian specializes in the hand coiled traditional style shaped pots and designs. He gathers natural pigments from the Acoma Pueblo to make his pottery. He cleans, mixes, hand coils, shapes, paints, and fires his pottery the traditional way, outdoors. He paints traditional designs, deer patterns, and parrot motifs with natural pigments He was quoted as saying: “They are more challenging to create and I enjoy the challenge.” Adrian signs his art as: A.Vallo, Acoma.

Adrian is related to the following artists: The late Santana Cerno, Eva Histia (grandmothers), The famous Joseph & Barbara Cerno (uncle & aunt), and Ergil Vallo (cousin).

Awards:

-1992 New Mexico State Fair 2nd place

-1994 Arizona Casa Grande 3rd place

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies 

 

Vallo, Ergil Dalawepi (Hopi, Acoma) Deseased

Ergil F. Vallo, Sr., “Dalawepi”, which means “Colors Of The rainbow”, was born in 1959. Ergil is half Acoma and half Hopi. Ergil was 21 years of age when he began creating his art work. Ergil has been working with pottery since 1990. He was inspired to continue the family tradition of crafting art by observing many of his family members create their art. He wanted be an active participant and add to the legacy of a long lived tradition.

Ergil primarily specializes in the incised black pottery. He uses natural pollens and minerals to get the contrast in the brilliant colors on his designs which include: hopi kachinas, mimbres animals, kiva steps, and geometric designs.

Ergil signs his pottery as: Dalawepi, Acoma/Hopi, but in the past he signed it as Ergil Vallo, Acoma/Hopi.

 

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Hopi-Tewa Pottery 500 Artist Biographies

-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

-Collections of Southwestern Pottery

-Miniature Arts of the Southwest

 

Awards:

-New Mexico State Fair (1st, 2nd, and 3rd) place ribbons various years

-Gallup Indian Ceremonial 2nd place in 1994

 

Vallo, Jay (Acoma)

Jeanette Vallo, “Nah-Sde-Te”, known as “Jay”, is a full blooded Native American Indian. She was born into the Acoma Pueblo in 1959. She was inspired to continue the long lived tradition of working with pottery by observing her grandmother, Lita Garcia, at a very young age. She comes from a family of talented and creative pottery makers and painters. The lucrative aspect was also inspiration for Jay to become an artist. Jay is a natural gifted painter and with this in her blood she began painting many patterns at the age of 18.

Jay specializes in hand painting ceramic pottery. She hand paints eye dazzling starburst and fine line patterns on wedding vases and other shapes of pottery. Jay was taught the traditional methods of hand coiling pottery using ancient traditional methods from her family members. However, she really enjoys the hand painting side of working with the pottery. She signs her pottery as Jay Vallo, Acoma. Jay is related to the following artists: Brian Chino (brother), Corrine Chino (sister), Germaine Reed (sister), and Edna Chino (mother).

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

Awards:

-New Mexico State Fair 1st Place

-New Mexico State Fair 2nd Place 1995

-New Mexico State Fair 3rd Place 

 

Vallo, Kim (Acoma)

Kim Vallo is a full blooded Native American Indian. She was born in 1968 into the Acoma Pueblo. Kim is a member of the Red Corn Clan and the Small Oak Clan. She grew up in Grants, N.M. Her inspiration for continuing a long lived tradition comes from many different sources. However, her immediate family is where her encouragement to learn to paint comes from. The lucrative aspect of the business also was inspiration for her to become an artist. While attending school she would often catch herself drawing lines on paper.

Kim specializes hand painting ceramic pottery. She hand paints fine line, feather, and starburst patterns on a wide variety of shaped pots like wedding vases, water jugs, olla’s, and traditional shapes. She has recently sparked an interest in hand coiling traditional pottery. She is currently in the early stages of becoming a traditional hand coiling artist. She is currently working mainly with miniature pottery. However, Kim feels she needs more practice with hand coiling pottery the way of her ancesstors.  She signs her pottery as: Kim Vallo, Acoma, N.M. Kim is related to Leland Vallo, Thomas Vallo (brothers), and the late Simon & Marie Vallo (parents).

 

Vallo, Leland (Acoma)

Leland Robert Vallo “Pinion Mesa”, is a full blooded Native American Indian, who was born in 1969 into the Acoma Pueblo. He was inspired by many famous artists, like Dorothy Torivio, to continue the long lived tradition of hand coiling pottery using ancient methods. He began making pottery in 1991.

Leland specializes in hand coiled Tularosa Swirl pattern pottery. He gathers his clay from the grounds within the Acoma Pueblo along with other natural pigments. He cleans his clay, mixes, hand coils, shapes, paints, and fires his pottery outdoors. He hand coils many different shapes and sizes of pottery including seed pots, wedding vases and bowls. He also paints animals, mimbres designs, and incorporates Kiva step patterns into his designs. He also paints on ceramic ware from time to time. Leland states that he is still amazed at the quality of the artwork that Native Americans produce today. However, his biggest inspiration thrives from memories that he has from his mother and his best friend, the late Marie Vallo. He signs his pottery as: L. Vallo, Acoma , N.M.

Check for work by this artist in our Acoma Pottery section!

Vallo, Nathaniel (Acoma)

Nathaniel Vallo is a full blooded Native American Indian. He was born into the Pueblo of Acoma in 1965. He was inspired by all of his family members to carry on the tradition of crafting pottery. He has been creating his intricate work since 1985. Working with art has always come naturally to Nathaniel. He has always had a creative mind and has established himself as a fine artisan with his unique techniques and styles.

Nathaniel specializes in the hand etched ceramic pottery featuring Kokopelli, geometric  designs, mimbres designs, animals, and kachina dancers with intricate pueblo backgrounds. Every pot he etches is different, there are no 2 alike. He applies the paint to his pottery and then he begins etching his intricate masterpieces by hand. Nathaniel said, “A vision of ancestry comes to mind in every piece of pottery that I etch.” Nathaniel pours his heart into his precise intricate art work and is very proud of his accomplishments. According to Nathaniel, working with his style of art is very relaxing and completes his day. He signs his work as: N.Vallo, Acoma, NM.

Nathaniel is related to the following artists: Frederica Antonio, Melissa Antonio (sisters), Clara Santiago (aunt), Felix Poncho (uncle), and the late Rose Poncho (grandmother).

Awards:

-New Mexico State Fair 2nd & 3rd place

-Various arts and crafts shows

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies 

 

Victorino, Greg (Acoma)

Greg P. Victorino is a full blooded Native American Indian. He was born into the Acoma Pueblo in 1960. Greg was inspired to learn the art of painting on ceramic pottery by watching others. However, what has made his art so uniquely wonderful is his imaginative designs which awe and amaze the average collector. In addition, the lucrative aspects of the business have played a key roll in motivating him to paint. Greg has been painting on ceramic pottery since he was 12 years old. He would observe other family members and this sparked an interest in learning an art.

Greg specializes in painting geometric eye dazzling designs on several shapes and sizes of ceramic pots. Greg measures each of his patterns as he paints. He uses only the black and white colors to paint his intricate geometrical puzzle patterns, which he is well known for. Greg signs his pottery as: Greg Victorino, Acoma, NM.

Greg is related to the famous Sandra Victorino (sister-in-law). 

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies 

 

Victorino, Sandra (Acoma)

Sandra Victorino is a full blooded Native American Indian born into the Pueblo of the Acoma in 1958. She was inspired to learn the art of hand coiling pottery from admiring her famous Aunt, Dorothy Torivio, who is one of Acoma’s finest potter’s still alive today. Sandra strongly believes that traditional ways must be kept alive to continue the long lived legacy of her people.

Sandra gathers the clay from within the sacred grounds in Acoma. She was taught how to sift clay, hand coil pottery, paint with a yucca plant, and fire pottery. Sandra specializes in hand coiled pottery with spiral designs like the step to step, checker board, snowflake, half snowflake, and fine line designs. She will also paint Kokopelli on her pottery from time to time. Sandra signs her pottery as: Sandra Victorino, Acoma, NM.

Sandra is related to the following artists: Edna Chino (mother), Brian Chino (brother), Greg Victorino (brother-in-law), and the famous Dorothy Torivio (aunt).

Awards:

-1999 Santa Fe Indian Market 2nd Place

-1993 Gallup Indian Ceremonials

-1994 New Mexico State Fair 1st place

-1996 Santa Fe Market 1st place

-1997 Eighth Northern Shows 1st place

-Other awards numerous to list

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-Art of Clay

Check for work by this artist in our Acoma Pottery section!

Vigil-Toya, Georgia (Jemez)

Georgia Vigil-Toya, member of the Coyote Clan, is a full blooded Native American Indian. She was born in 1966 into the Jemez Pueblo. Georgia was inspired to continue the long lived tradition of hand coiling pottery and using ancient traditional methods from her grandmother, Reyes S. Toya. Reyes taught Georgia all the fundamentals of working with clay and shared with Georgia her special techniques in the process. She began working with clay in 1984. The lucrative aspect of the business was also inspiration for Georgia to become an artist.

Georgia specializes in hand coiled, hand polished, and hand etched pottery. She gathers her clay and other natural pigments from the hills within the Jemez Pueblo. Then, she breaks up the clumps of clay and soaks it for a few days to make it easier to work with. She turns the clumps into a fine sand like form and mixes with water and other natural pigments. Then, Georgia begins hand coiling her pottery. The pottery is set out to dry and is sanded to smooth out the roughness of the masterpiece. Georgia hand etches mimbres designs and many different styles of animals on her pottery. She fires her pottery the traditional way, outdoors, with cedar wood chips. She continues to use designs which her mother and grandmother are credited with. She hand coils many different shapes and sizes of pottery. Georgia is related to the following artists: Lorraine Chinana, Ida Yepa (sisters), and Clara Gachupin (aunt). She signs her pottery as: Georgia Vigil-Toya, Jemez Pueblo.

 

Awards:

-New Mexico State Fair 2nd Place

-Gallup Inter-Tribal Ceremonial Merit Award

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

Vote-Honani, Jocelyn (Hopi)

Jocelyn “Honani” Vote “Kocha Hon Mana” (White Bear Girl), member of the Water Clan and Bear Clan, was born in Yuma Arizona in 1962 into the Hopi Nation. The Continuance of ancient traditions of her people are extremely important to her, being that she is a teacher by profession. This is a very enjoyable hobby for her to relax with.

Jocelyn is the only one of a handful of female artist hand carving Kachina Dolls to date. She specializes in hand carved Hopi Kachina Dolls carved out of cottonwood root. She began her curiosity at the age of 7, being inspired by her late Uncle Hubert Honani, who also was a very talented Hopi Kachina carver. Her Kachinas have become highly detailed since the age of 19 when she began carving them. There are over 300 known kachinas from the Hopi Reservation alone. Kachinas are believed to be the spiritual guardians of the Indian way of life, and they are also used in certain religious ceremonies. It is extremely important that you don’t offend kachinas. When carving a kachina you must represent them very accurately. Jocelyn signs her work as: Kocha Hon Mana, which is her Hopi Indian name, followed by a bear paw to denote her Clan origin.

Jocelyn is related to: Aaron & Ernest Honani, who are her cousins, and also to the late Hubert Honani (uncle).

Awards:

-1996 Gallup Intertribal 3rd Place

-1996 New Mexico State Fair 3rd Place

-1997 New Mexico State Fair 3rd Place

-1998 New Mexico State Fair 2nd Place

Publications:

-August 1998 Featured artist on internet

Whitedove, Shyatesa (Acoma)

Shyatesa White Dove, “Sister to the Hopi Kachinas”, was born into the Pueblo of the Acoma in 1956. She has been making pottery since 1984. Shyatesa was inspired to continue the tradition in pottery making by her Grandmother, Connie O. Cerno, at the age of 28 and her desire to revive the old historic Acoma Pueblo pottery designs.

Shyatesa specializes in the polychrome traditional Acoma style pottery. Her favorite to design and paint is the traditional parrot & floral motifs. She will either hand coil her pottery or she will paint on ceramic ware. On her hand coiled pottery she will go in search of all the natural clays and paints available to her on the sacred grounds within the Acoma Pueblo. She learned how to clean, mix, coil, shape, paint, and fire her pottery. Shyatesa signs her pottery as: Date pottery was coiled or painted, Shyatesa White Dove, followed by a brief description of pottery style.

 

Awards:

-1999 New Mexico State Fair 2nd Place

-New Mexico State Fair 1st place

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-National Geographic featured artist

-Travel Magazine ongoing edition

-Acoma & Laguna Pottery book by Rick Dillingham

Whitegoat, Hilda (Navajo)

Hilda Whitegoat is a full blooded Native American Indian. She was born in 1967 into the Navajo Nation. Hilda was inspired to continue a long lived tradition of working with art by observing her sister, Susie Charlie, work on her pottery. Susie who is credited with pioneering the popular Navajo Etched Pottery, shared the techniques of constructing the popular art form known today as “Navajo Etched Pottery” with Hilda. Hilda began crafting pottery at the age of 23, in 1989. The lucrative aspect of the business is also inspiration in her decision to become an artist,being that she has a family to raise and it keeps her close to her children.

Hilda paints on ceramic pottery and uses a sharp blade to hand etch on the pottery. Then, she fires her pottery in a kiln. She paints and etches on all sizes of ceramic and horsehair ware available to her. She signs her pottery as: Hilda Whitegoat, Navajo. Hilda is related to the following artists: Everson Whitegoat (brother), Myron Charlie (nephew), and Michael Charlie (nephew).  

Check for work by this artist in our Horsehair Pottery section!

Yazzie, Nora (Navajo)

Nora Yazzie is a full blooded Native American Indian. She was born in 1954 into the Navajo Nation. Nora is a Dine from the Four Corners region of the Navajo Reservation. She was raised in Farmington, New Mexico and attended a Navajo Methodist Mission High School where she was first introduced to the arts through clay, drama, and creative writing. Encouraged by her teachers to explore each medium, she entered her first local high school art show and placed first in the clay division. Thus, began her journey into the art world.

Nora’s grandparents were influential figures in her work. As a child she was fortunate to have observed and participated in blessing ceremonies performed by her grandfather who was a sandpainter. Her grandmother, a renown rug weaver and midwife, personified earth mother as she helped bring new life into the world. These important observations served as seeds planted for cultivation of her creative imagination.

Traditional art was always a part of her environment. Because there is no word for “art” in the Navajo language, she never questioned the validity of the creative process in a western European sense. Creating is a way of life for her and her family. Colors come from the earth so land is a natural and essential part of the process. In her case, her mother and grandmother taught her to observe land formations where rug designs come from. Land formations combined with their natural colors are her sole derivatives and foundation when designing a piece. Eventually she hopes to develop and create monumental sculpture and bronze. Constant growth and stretching ideas into three-dimensional form is an exciting path for her right now.

 

Yazzie, Timmy (Navajo/San Felipe)

Timmy Yazzie is a full blooded Native American, half San Felipe and half Navajo. He was born in 1968. He was inspired to make jewelry by his friends Chalmers Day and Jimmy Harrison, who assisted Timmy in mastering his jewelry making skills. He has been making jewelry since 1990.

Timmy specializes in making all types of jewelry. He turns raw silver into fabulous earrings, necklaces, pendants, bolo ties, concho belts, bracelets, and rings. He uses a wide variety of stones on his jewelry. Timmy draws designs on his raw silver freehand, cuts his design out with a coping saw, sauters top plate to the bottom plate, oxidizes, cuts stones out manually, shapes stones and polishes his finished piece. He signs his jewelry as: TY with the Y beneath the letter T.

Timmy is related to the following artists: Dora Yazzie (mother), the late Joe Yazzie, and the late Santana Chavez.

Yellowhorse, Ben (Navajo)

His father, Chief Juan Yellowhorse is from the Towering House People Clan "Ki yaa' áanii", from Wide Ruins Arizona. A Proud Navajo Indian, Chief Yellowhorse owned and operated "CHIEF YELLOWHORSE TRADING POST" since 1960 located at the Arizona-New Mexico border, till October 27, 1999. While working in his Office at the Trading Post, Chief Yellowhorse died. The Trading Post is still managed by the Yellowhorse Family.

Ben’s mother Harriett Marmon, is a Laguna Pueblo and Isleta Pueblo Indian. Also an accomplished Native American artist. Harriett retired from Sue Rayos Marmon Elementary School in Albuquerque, NM. Which was named after her Grandmother, who lived to the age of 111 years. Her grandmother lived through the government relocation of the Pueblo Indians to the east coast where she acquired an education. After her Grandma came back out west, She become a leader in education for the Laguna Pueblo People. Harriett has a distinguished talent for Storytelling Pueblo Folklore.

Ben comes from a family of nine children.  Eight of the siblings have followed in the Yellowhorse Family long tradition of authentic handcrafted Navajo jewelry design.  The ninth sibling has an accomplished career as a professional musician (Jaime Bird).  

Ben Yellowhorse now lives on his Mother’s land in Laguna Pueblo, where he works his magic on sterling silver, turning it to breathtaking pieces of art. Ben started working on his craft at very young age, learning from his Father, Mother, brothers,  uncles, aunts, and grandparents. He was taught how to work with a variety of metals and to never sacrifice quality by using cheaper or pre-manufactured materials. Ben’s jewelry is all hand stamped, each individual piece is a unique example of his talent and his family's long tradition.  His love for the Southwest is clearly seen in each magnificent piece of art that he creates.

Ben specializes with thick sterling sliver bracelets, but also works with other metals and other kinds of jewelry. By practicing his art, Ben is keeping his father’s memory and a Navajo tradition alive.

 

Yepa, Emma (Jemez)

Emma Yepa is an Award Winning Jemez Pueblo Artist. Her melon style swirl pottey is coveted by collectors and enthusiasts alike. Emma Comes from a long line of  Noted Jemez pueblo potters including her mother Ida Yepa, her grandmother Reyes Toya and her Aunt Alvina Yepa. Although young, Emma has over 20 years of pottery experience since she began the trade at the young age of 13.

 

Yepa, Marcella (Jemez)

Marcella Yepa, member of the Sun Clan, is a full blooded Native American Indian. She was born into the Jemez Pueblo in 1964. Marcella began working with clay at the age of 19. She was inspired to learn the art of working with clay from her aunt, Alvina Yepa. Alvina shared with Marcella all the fundamentals of hand coiling traditional pottery. She also taught her which hills provided the best clay to work with and special techniques to construct her art. The lucrative aspect also inspired Marcella to become an artisan. However, establishing her own unique style of art gave her a feeling of self worth.

Marcella specializes in hand coiled contemporary swirl  and melon styled pottery. She gathers her clay and other natural pigments within the Jemez Pueblo. She soaks the clay, grinds it to a powder form, cleans the clay, hand mixes, hand coils, shapes, carves the pottery, polishes her pottery with a stone, and fires her pottery outdoors with cedar chips. She hand coils many shapes and sizes of pottery like wedding vases, ollas, and traditional shapes. She signs her pottery as: M. Yepa, Jemez, or Marcella Yepa, Jemez. She is related to the following artists: Emma Yepa (cousin), and Lawrence Yepa.

Awards:

-None to date

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

-1996 Edition of New Mexico Magazine 

 

Yepa, Maxine (Jemez)

Maxine Yepa is a full blooded Native American Indian and a member of the Oak Clan. Maxine was born in 1970 and is half Jemez Pueblo and half Walatowa Indian. Maxine developed an interest in hand coiling pottery at the age of 15. Her grandmother, Anasita Chinana, taught her all the traditional fundamentals of working with clay art. The lucrative aspect of the business was also incentive for her to become an artisan. She is the daughter of Christine Tosa, another well known Jemez potter.

Maxine specializes in handmade traditional and contemporary styled Jemez pottery. She gathers all of her natural raw materials from within the Jemez Pueblo. She hand cleans, mixes, hand coils, shapes, sands, paints, and fires her own pottery. On her contemporary styles she hand carves melon ribs or swirls on each piece to add some flare to her work. Finally, Maxine stone polishes her pottery. She has signed her pottery as Maxine Andrews, Jemez/Walatowa, but now she signs it as Maxine Yepa Walatowa/Jemez.

Maxine is related to the following artisans: Christine Tosa (mother), Jennifer Andrew (sister), Pauline Romero (aunt), and Donald Chinana (cousin). 

 

Youvella, Nolan (Hopi)

Nolan Youvella Nampeyo, “Sunman”, member of the Corn Clan, was born into the Hopi/Tewa Reservation in 1970. He is the great grandson of Nampeyo, the woman who is the most highly honored Hopi pottery artist. The Nampeyo family is credited for reviving and expanding the beautiful ancient style of pottery called Sikyatki. Nolan began experimenting with pottery making at the age of 11. He learned the art of traditional pottery making from his famous Mother, Iris Youvella Nampeyo. Iris taught Nolan all the fundamentals of coiling and painting all the old ancient styles of pottery which is sought after from many collector’s around the world.

Nolan specializes in appliqueed buffware jars (pottery) which are all made from Mother Earth. He has his own unique style of contemporary pottery. All of the materials that he uses are dug up from the area surrounding his home. Nolan is a very creative artist and is currently experimenting with oil paintings to expand his artistic abilities. Nolan signs his pottery as: Nolan Nampeyo.

Nolan is related to many famous potters among them are: The famous “Nampeyo” (grandmother). Fannie Nampeyo (grandmother), Tom Polacca (uncle), and Clinton Polacca (cousin).

 

Awards:

-None to date

Publications:

-Hopi-Tewa Pottery 500 Artist Biographies

-Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery

 

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